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Michio Kaku. Michio Kaku (born January 24, 1947) is an American theoretical physicist, the Henry Semat Professor of Theoretical Physics at the City College of New York, a futurist, and a communicator and popularizer of science.

Michio Kaku

He has written several books about physics and related topics, has made frequent appearances on radio, television, and film, and writes extensive online blogs and articles. He has written three New York Times Best Sellers: Physics of the Impossible (2008) and Physics of the Future (2011) and the Future of the Mind. Early life and education[edit] Kaku was born in San Jose, California to Japanese immigrant parents (with Tibetan DNA ancestry).[1] His grandfather was in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.[2] His father was born in California but was educated in Japan and spoke little English.

Both his parents were put in the Tule Lake War Relocation Center, where they met and where his brother was born. Academic career[edit] Popular science[edit] Books[edit] Radio[edit] Kardashev scale. The Kardashev scale is a method of measuring a civilization's level of technological advancement, based on the amount of energy a civilization is able to utilize.

Kardashev scale

The scale has three designated categories called Type I, II, and III. A Type I civilization uses all available resources impinging on its home planet, Type II harnesses all the energy of its star, and Type III of its galaxy. List of rampage killers. This is a partial list of rampage killings.

List of rampage killers

It is further divided into several subsections. This list shall contain every case with at least one of the following features: Rampage killings with six or more dead (excluding the perpetrator)Rampage killings with at least four people killed and a double digit number of victims (dead plus injured)Rampage killings with at least a dozen victims (dead plus injured) In the tables that follow, the "W" column indicates the weapon, or weapons, used.

Details are listed in the Annotation section. Africa and the Middle East[edit] Only the first 15 entries are shown here. This section contains cases that occurred in Africa and the Middle East. Americas[edit] Only the first 15 entries are shown here. List of serial killers before 1900. List of serial killers by number of victims. Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Despite its name, the gunfight actually occurred in a narrow lot six doors west of the rear entrance to the O.K.

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral

Corral on Fremont Street, and also in the street. The two opposing parties were initially only about 6 feet (1.8 m) apart. About thirty shots were fired in thirty seconds. Ike Clanton filed murder charges against the Earps and Doc Holliday but they were eventually exonerated by a local judge after a 30-day preliminary hearing and then again by a local grand jury. Shell game. The shell game (also known as Thimblerig, Three shells and a pea, the old army game) is portrayed as a gambling game, but in reality, when a wager for money is made, it is a confidence trick used to perpetrate fraud.

Shell game

In confidence trick slang, this swindle is referred to as a short-con because it is quick and easy to pull off. Play[edit] R'lyeh. The location of R'Lyeh given by Lovecraft was 47°9′S 126°43′W in the southern Pacific Ocean.

R'lyeh

August Derleth placed it at 49°51′S 128°34′W. Both locations are close to the Pacific pole of inaccessibility or "Nemo" point, 48°52.6′S 123°23.6′W, a point in the ocean farthest from any land mass. The nightmare corpse-city of R'lyeh…was built in measureless eons behind history by the vast, loathsome shapes that seeped down from the dark stars. There lay great Cthulhu and his hordes, hidden in green slimy vaults. R'lyeh is characterized by bizarre architecture likened to non-Euclidean geometry.

Lovecraft claims R'lyeh is located at WikiMiniAtlas 47°9′S 126°43′W / 47.150°S 126.717°W / -47.150; -126.717 (R'lyeh fictional location (Lovecraft))Coordinates: 48°52.6′S 123°23.6′W / 48.8767°S 123.3933°W / -48.8767; -123.3933 (Oceanic Pole of Inaccessibility)), a point in the ocean farthest from any land mass. Cintamani. Shambhala. In Tibetan Buddhist and Hindu traditions, Shambhala (also spelled Shambala or Shamballa; Sanskrit: शंभाल; Tibetan: བདེ་འབྱུང་; Wylie: bde 'byung, pron. de-jung; Chinese: 香巴拉; pinyin: xiāngbālā) is a kingdom hidden somewhere in Inner Asia.

Shambhala

It is mentioned in various ancient texts, including the Kalachakra Tantra[2] and the ancient texts of the Zhang Zhung culture which predated Tibetan Buddhism in western Tibet. The Bön[3] scriptures speak of a closely related land called Olmolungring. Hindu texts such as Vishnu Purana (4.24) mention the village Shambhala as the birthplace of Kalki, the final incarnation of Vishnu who will usher in a new Golden Age (Satya Yuga).[4] Whatever its historical basis, Shambhala gradually came to be seen as a Buddhist Pure Land, a fabulous kingdom whose reality is visionary or spiritual as much as physical or geographic.

§In the Buddhist Kalachakra teachings[edit] Shambhala is ruled over by Lord Maitreya. Shangri-La. Many scholars believe that Shangri-La is Shambhala, a mythical kingdom in Tibetan Buddhist tradition, which was sought by Eastern and Western explorers.[2] Etymology[edit] The phrase "Shangri-La" most probably comes from the Tibetan Standard Tibetan: ཞང་,"Shang" - a district of Ü-Tsang, north of Tashilhunpo[3]" + Standard Tibetan: རི, pronounced "ri", "Mountain" = "Shang Mountain" + Standard Tibetan: ལ, Mountain Pass, which suggests that the area is accessed to, or is named by, "Shang Mountain Pass".

Shangri-La

Location[edit] A popularly believed physical inspiration for Hilton's Shangri-La is the Hunza Valley in northern Pakistan, close to the Chinese border, which Hilton visited a few years before Lost Horizon was published.[5] Being an isolated green valley surrounded by mountains, enclosed on the western end of the Himalayas, it closely matches the physical description in the novel. Another place that has been thought[by whom?] Modern usage[edit]