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Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camp Goes Up In Flames. (CANNON BALL, N.D.) — Some of the last remnants of the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp went up in flames Wednesday as opponents of the project set fire to makeshift wooden housing as part of a leaving ceremony ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land.

Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camp Goes Up In Flames

The camp has been home to demonstrators for six months as they tried to thwart construction of the pipeline. Many of the protesters planned to go peacefully, but authorities were prepared to arrest others who said they would defy the deadline in a final show of dissent. About 150 people marched arm-in-arm out of the camp, singing and playing drums as they walked down a highway. It was not clear where they were headed. One man carried an American flag hung upside-down. The REAL ‘Lone Ranger’ Was An African American Lawman Who Lived With Native American Indians.

The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon.

The REAL ‘Lone Ranger’ Was An African American Lawman Who Lived With Native American Indians

Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark. Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.

While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Indian Status: 5 more things you need to know - Aboriginal - CBC. A status card is government ID that identifies someone as a "status Indian" as defined by the federal Indian Act.

Indian Status: 5 more things you need to know - Aboriginal - CBC

Although a status card allows "registered Indians" access to some benefits, it's not a credit card and it's not a free pass. Let's clear up some myths around status cards — as simply as possible. Phil Borges - People of Indigenous Cultures - Photography - World photographer of indigenous and tribal cultures - StumbleUpon. Depp to Native Youth: 'You're Still Warriors, Man' And so the magazine-cover onslaught is underway.

Depp to Native Youth: 'You're Still Warriors, Man'

Expect to see Johnny Depp's Tonto-fied face (and bird-ified crown) all over your local newsstand—today, it's Rolling Stone. In the extensive cover story, Depp ruminates on his Hollywood success and his future, and addresses the role at hand: Tonto in The Lone Ranger. ON THE COSTUME: "I wanted him to be no joke. ... First of all, I wouldn't f*** with someone with a dead bird on their head. Aboriginal Sign Project Aims To Reclaim And Rename. The word Canada comes from the Iroquois word kanata meaning village, settlement or land.

Aboriginal Sign Project Aims To Reclaim And Rename

There are currently over 60 First Nations languages in Canada grouped into 12 distinct language families, according to Statistics Canada. Before European Settlers came to Canada, it was not uncommon for Aboriginal women to hold equal power to men, and even had to ability to take the power away from the chief, reports UBC. Women’s suffrage in Canada was not granted until 1918. Kent Monkman: A trickster with a cause crashes Canada’s 150th birthday party. In Kent Monkman’s studio in west Toronto, there’s a large painting based on Robert Harris’s famous group portrait of the Fathers of Confederation.

Kent Monkman: A trickster with a cause crashes Canada’s 150th birthday party

The delegates at the Charlottetown constitutional meetings of 1864 stand or sit in their accustomed places, but in the foreground, a nude figure lounges before the conference table, under the eyes of John A. Macdonald. It’s Miss Chief Eagle Testickle, Mr. Monkman’s alter ego. “She’s trying to get a seat at the table, or she could be a hired entertainer,” said the prominent painter of Cree ancestry, whose works have been collected by major museums such as the National Gallery of Canada, the Glenbow Museum and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Spring's least-wanted fashion trend: The co-opting of Aboriginal dress. I often feel invisible. When I tell people that I grew up on an Aboriginal reserve, they look at me like I’m a mythical unicorn, even though more than a million people in Canada identify themselves as First Nations, Métis or Inuit. I probably wouldn’t have thought we existed either if I hadn’t grown up on the Six Nations reserve in Southwestern Ontario. Back then, I only saw people who vaguely looked like me on CBC’s North of 60 . It was slim pickings as far as cultural references were concerned. But today, instead of homages rooted in realism like the CBC offered in the ’90s, all I see in the mass market is a shiny commercial version of “Native Americans” rooted in stereotypes from westerns, Disney cartoons and sports mascots.

8 Songs by Native American Rappers That Deserve to Be Heard. When hip-hop was born in the Bronx in the 1970s, it offered an unprecedented and powerful voice for the voiceless.

8 Songs by Native American Rappers That Deserve to Be Heard

The movement has since gone global, lending a vocabulary to people struggling for liberty and safety in places as far-reaching as Palestine, China and Russia. Hip-hop still has work to do in the States, though, and nowhere do hip-hop's stories of liberation and resistance resonate with greater urgency than with the country's longest oppressed group: its indigenous population. "Native Americans grasp that culture of hip-hop because of the struggle," Crow rapper Supaman told NPR.

"Hip-hop was talking about the ghetto life, poverty, crime, drugs, alcohol, teen pregnancy; all that crazy stuff that happens in the ghetto is similar to the reservation life. Profile: A young aboriginal woman’s mental health struggles. Jessica Dinovitzer is 21 and of Mohawk descent.

Profile: A young aboriginal woman’s mental health struggles

She works in the Native Circle at the Youth Services Bureau. She is one of the 310 participants in a Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health study that produced startling findings, reported by the Citizen last month, about aboriginal youth mental health in the Ottawa region. Reporter Anaïs Voski sat down with Dinovitzer to put a human face on the report. Q: How did you come to participate in Wabano’s survey on aboriginal youth mental health? A: I come from a Mohawk background from my mother’s side and I was born in Ottawa, so I am part of the more than 43,000 native people who live in the Champlain LHIN area. New Sacred » So you say you’ve got white privilege. Now what? White privilege.

New Sacred » So you say you’ve got white privilege. Now what?

It’s the phrase bigots hate to hear and progressives love to denounce. If you are white and clicked on this blog to be congratulated for naming your privilege, you can stop reading in a few characters. Thank you for naming your privilege. It’s a good starting point of solidarity with people of color (POC) to name that your privilege exists. To Johnny Depp from a 1/4 Ojibwa.