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Fake or real middleschool 8. New Graph Tries To Break Down Real And Fake News — How'd They Do? We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned : All Tech Considered. "The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right.

We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned : All Tech Considered

" Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Fanatic Studio/Getty Images "The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right. " A lot of fake and misleading news stories were shared across social media during the election. We wondered who was behind that story and why it was written. We tried to look up who owned it and hit a wall. By day, John Jansen is head of engineering at Master-McNeil Inc., a tech company in Berkeley, Calif. Jansen started by looking at the site's history. Jansen is kind of like an archaeologist. The "Denver Guardian" was built and designed using a pretty common platform — WordPress. "That was sort of the thread that started to unravel everything," Jansen says. The sites include NationalReport.net, USAToday.com.co, WashingtonPost.com.co.

Interview Highlights Yes. Can I ask who? Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2016 is... Post-truth adjective Relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief. 16 November 2016, Oxford, UK: Today, Oxford Dictionaries announces post-truth as its 2016 international Word of the Year.

Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2016 is...

The Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year is a word or expression chosen to reflect the passing year in language. Every year, the Oxford Dictionaries team reviews candidates for word of the year and then debates their merits, choosing one that captures the ethos, mood, or preoccupations of that particular year. Language research conducted by Oxford Dictionaries editors reveals that use of the word post-truth has increased by approximately 2,000% over its usage in 2015. The compound word post-truth exemplifies an expansion in the meaning of the prefix post- that has become increasingly prominent in recent years.

Head Transplant Patient Will Use VR - Real or Fake? Last year, Italian neuroscientist Dr.

Head Transplant Patient Will Use VR - Real or Fake?

Sergio Canavero shocked the medical establishment when he announced that he would be able to transplant a human head onto a new body by 2017. He even gave a high-energy Tedx talk about the surgery. But the project was greeted with skepticism. The medical community has called the project junk science, reports Sam Kean at The Atlantic—one doctor even suggested that those involved should be charged with murder if it fails. The other big problem—besides the almost insurmountable technical details and the $10 to $100 million price tag—is that transplanting a head onto a new body could be a recipe for confusion and madness. Arthur Caplan, director of medical ethics at New York University’s Langone Medical Centre, who is a vocal Canavero critic, tells Christoper Hooten at The Independent that head transplant patients “would end up being overwhelmed with different pathways and chemistry than they are used to and they’d go crazy.” Researchers find students have trouble judging the credibility of information online.

When it comes to evaluating information that flows across social channels or pops up in a Google search, young and otherwise digital-savvy students can easily be duped, finds a new report from researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Education.

researchers find students have trouble judging the credibility of information online

The report, released this week by the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG), shows a dismaying inability by students to reason about information they see on the Internet, the authors said. Students, for example, had a hard time distinguishing advertisements from news articles or identifying where information came from. "Many people assume that because young people are fluent in social media they are equally perceptive about what they find there," said Professor Sam Wineburg, the lead author of the report and founder of SHEG. "Our work shows the opposite to be true. " The researchers began their work in January 2015, well before the most recent debates over fake news and its influence on the presidential election.

Information Literacy