Dunbar's Number

Facebook Twitter

Dunbar's Number and the Social Business. Dunbar’s Number Most people working with social technologies will be familiar with Dunbar’s Number: the number of people we can comfortably maintain stable social relationships with.

Dunbar's Number and the Social Business

Apparently it varies from 100 to 230, with 150 being the norm. This we each typically connect up with and socialise with on average 150 people. Forget Dunbar’s Number, Our Future Is in Scoble’s Number. February 16, 2009 by Hutch Carpenter Photo credit: Mark Wallace I probably don’t know about your latest job project.

Forget Dunbar’s Number, Our Future Is in Scoble’s Number

I don’t know what your kids are up to. I don’t know about that vacation you’ve got coming up. [1105.5170] Validation of Dunbar's number in Twitter conversations. Facebook & Dunbar’s number. About 20 years ago the evolutionary anthropologist Robin Dunbar proposed his eponymous number: Dunbar’s number is a theoretical cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships.

Facebook & Dunbar’s number

These are relationships in which an individual knows who each person is, and how each person relates to every other person. Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restrictive rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group. Beating Dunbars Number. There’s a theory called Dunbar’s Number that suggests there’s an upper limit to the amount of relationships we can maintain.

Beating Dunbars Number

If you’re interested in networking, this should be an issue. That number, for the record, is 150. Derek Halpern asked me how I dealt with that issue, as I spend my time with far more than 150. Here are some thoughts. Dunbar's number. Social networks: Primates on Facebook. Don't Believe Facebook; You Only Have 150 Friends. Hide captionAccording to "Dunbar's Number," human beings can maintain a network of only about 150 close friends. istockphoto.com According to "Dunbar's Number," human beings can maintain a network of only about 150 close friends.

GORE-TEX, the company that makes wetsuits, hiking boots and ponchos, is the subject of a famous anecdote in the world of sociology. Dunbar's Number proves that you can't realistically follow more than 150 friends on Twitter. Dunbar's number rules the Twitterverse › News in Science (ABC Science) News in Science Tuesday, 7 June 2011 Genelle WeuleABC Social networks Ashton Kutcher might have more than six million followers on Twitter, but his brain's not big enough to have deep conversations with more than 150 of his nearest and dearest.

Dunbar's number rules the Twitterverse › News in Science (ABC Science)

Even the most ardent Twitter fiends can only befriend a finite number of people, according to new research published on the pre-press website arXiv.org. Sorry, Facebook friends: Our brains can't keep up. What's Your Dunbar Number? There are several key indicators - numbers we take seriously - to indicate "how we're doing.

What's Your Dunbar Number?

" Cholesterol levels, salary, and IQ score, for example. And now the concept of a "Dunbar number" is being tossed around. Briefly, the term is used to suggest that we can only manage, cognitively, a limited number of relationships. The average, suggested in anthropologist Robin Dunbar's research, is just under 150. The Dunbar Number as a Limit to Group Sizes - Life With Alacrity. For those of you not familiar with Dunbar's number it basically says that the most amount of people that you can maintain stable social relationships with is 150.

The Dunbar Number as a Limit to Group Sizes - Life With Alacrity

According to wikipedia: “Dunbar's number is a theoretical cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. Dunbar's number. Dunbar's number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships.

Dunbar's number

These are relationships in which an individual knows who each person is and how each person relates to every other person.[1][2][3][4][5][6] This number was first proposed by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar, who found a correlation between primate brain size and average social group size. By using the average human brain size and extrapolating from the results of primates, he proposed that humans can only comfortably maintain 150 stable relationships.[7] Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restrictive rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group.