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Dunbar's Number

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Dunbar's Number and the Social Business. Dunbar’s Number Most people working with social technologies will be familiar with Dunbar’s Number: the number of people we can comfortably maintain stable social relationships with.

Dunbar's Number and the Social Business

Apparently it varies from 100 to 230, with 150 being the norm. This we each typically connect up with and socialise with on average 150 people. This applies both to our friends in the ‘real’ as in the virtual – our own core social network will adhere to Dunbar’s principle. Evolutionary Anthropology and our neocortex Dunbar reckons that the reason for this is all to be found in our neocortex, so at heart it is an evolutionary anthropology argument and implies that we are working around biological limits. Whether this is the case or not is moot and indeed questions have been raised as to whether technology in the form of social networks can increase the number, so that American politicians for example, might have 300 friends.

Does E 2.0 = multiple 150s? Why do I need a social intranet? Forget Dunbar’s Number, Our Future Is in Scoble’s Number. February 16, 2009 by Hutch Carpenter Photo credit: Mark Wallace I probably don’t know about your latest job project.

Forget Dunbar’s Number, Our Future Is in Scoble’s Number

I don’t know what your kids are up to. I don’t know about that vacation you’ve got coming up. [1105.5170] Validation of Dunbar's number in Twitter conversations. Facebook & Dunbar’s number. Beating Dunbars Number. There’s a theory called Dunbar’s Number that suggests there’s an upper limit to the amount of relationships we can maintain.

Beating Dunbars Number

If you’re interested in networking, this should be an issue. That number, for the record, is 150. Derek Halpern asked me how I dealt with that issue, as I spend my time with far more than 150. Here are some thoughts. Be One of the 150. Dunbar's number. Social networks: Primates on Facebook. Don't Believe Facebook; You Only Have 150 Friends. According to "Dunbar's Number," human beings can maintain a network of only about 150 close friends.

Don't Believe Facebook; You Only Have 150 Friends

Istockphoto.com hide caption itoggle caption istockphoto.com According to "Dunbar's Number," human beings can maintain a network of only about 150 close friends. istockphoto.com GORE-TEX, the company that makes wetsuits, hiking boots and ponchos, is the subject of a famous anecdote in the world of sociology. "When Bill Gore set the company up, he set it up in his backyard," Robin Dunbar, a professor of evolutionary anthropology at the University of Oxford, tells NPR's Rachel Martin. From its modest beginnings, GORE-TEX grew and grew, Dunbar says, until Gore opened up a large factory.

Then one day, Dunbar says, Gore walked into his factory. "And he simply didn't know who everybody was. " Gore wondered why this was. Gore did some counting, and realized that after putting about 150 people in the same building, things at GORE-TEX just did not run smoothly. Business was never better. Dunbar's Number proves that you can't realistically follow more than 150 friends on Twitter. Dunbar's number rules the Twitterverse › News in Science (ABC Science) News in Science Tuesday, 7 June 2011 Genelle WeuleABC Social networks Ashton Kutcher might have more than six million followers on Twitter, but his brain's not big enough to have deep conversations with more than 150 of his nearest and dearest.

Dunbar's number rules the Twitterverse › News in Science (ABC Science)

Even the most ardent Twitter fiends can only befriend a finite number of people, according to new research published on the pre-press website arXiv.org. This finding backs up a theory known as Dunbar's number, which suggests that the size of the neocortex in the human brain limits our ability to maintain close relationships with more than around 150 people. Proposed in the 1990s, Dunbar's number has been applied to social connections from Neolithic and Roman times to Facebook. Researchers led by Dr Bruno Goncalves from the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research at Indiana University in the United States wanted to see if this was also true for Twitter. When people first join Twitter they have few friends.

Sorry, Facebook friends: Our brains can't keep up. What's Your Dunbar Number? There are several key indicators - numbers we take seriously - to indicate "how we're doing. " Cholesterol levels, salary, and IQ score, for example. And now the concept of a "Dunbar number" is being tossed around. Briefly, the term is used to suggest that we can only manage, cognitively, a limited number of relationships. The average, suggested in anthropologist Robin Dunbar's research, is just under 150. That's the average, so there are folks who could handle more than that, or fewer than that. In a blog about executive functioning and time management , who cares about Dunbar's number? In "Theory of Mind," intentionality refers to our ability to understand the intentions of other people. If you're a committed vegan but can see how other people might ethically arrive at a meat-based diet , that flexibility takes cognitive activity that we believe takes place in certain regions of the prefrontal cortex.

Photos: best friends and social wordle. The Dunbar Number as a Limit to Group Sizes - Life With Alacrity. For those of you not familiar with Dunbar's number it basically says that the most amount of people that you can maintain stable social relationships with is 150.

The Dunbar Number as a Limit to Group Sizes - Life With Alacrity

According to wikipedia: “Dunbar's number is a theoretical cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. These are relationships in which an individual knows who each person is, and how each person relates to every other person.Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restricted rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group. Dunbar's number. Dunbar's number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships.

Dunbar's number

These are relationships in which an individual knows who each person is and how each person relates to every other person.[1][2][3][4][5][6] This number was first proposed by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar, who found a correlation between primate brain size and average social group size. By using the average human brain size and extrapolating from the results of primates, he proposed that humans can only comfortably maintain 150 stable relationships.[7] Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restrictive rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group. Research background[edit] Primatologists have noted that, due to their highly social nature, primates must maintain personal contact with the other members of their social group, usually through social grooming. Alternative numbers[edit] Anthropologist H.