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Consciousness. Researchers & Theories... Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. Athene's Theory of Everything.

Patterns

The Philosopher Stoned. Kolmogorov Complexity – A Primer. Noosphere. Comparison between Karl Pribram's "Holographic Brain Theory" and ore conventional models of neuronal computation. One of the problems facing neural science is how to explain evidence that local lesions in the brain do not selectively impair one or another memory trace.

Comparison between Karl Pribram's "Holographic Brain Theory" and ore conventional models of neuronal computation

Note that in a hologram, restrictive damage does not disrupt the stored information because it has become distributed. The information has become blurred over the entire extent of the holographic film, but in a precise fashion that it can be deblurred by performing the inverse procedure. This paper will discuss in detail the concept of a holograph and the evidence Karl Pribram uses to support the idea that the brain implements holonomic transformations that distribute episodic information over regions of the brain (and later "refocuses" them into a form in which we re-member). Particular emphasis will be placed on the visual system since its the best characterized in the neurosciences. 1. 2. Timeline of Western philosophers. A wide-ranging list of philosophers from the Western traditions of philosophy.

Timeline of Western philosophers

Included are not only philosophers (Socrates, Plato), but also those who have had a marked importance upon the philosophy of the day. The list stops at the year 1950, after which philosophers fall into the category of Contemporary philosophy. Western and Middle Eastern philosophers[edit] Classical philosophers[edit] 600-500 BCE[edit] 500-400 BCE[edit] 400-300 BCE[edit] Hellenistic Philosophers[edit] List of unsolved problems in philosophy. This is a list of some of the major unsolved problems in philosophy.

List of unsolved problems in philosophy

Clearly, unsolved philosophical problems exist in the lay sense (e.g. Holon (philosophy) A holon (Greek: ὅλον, holon neuter form of ὅλος, holos "whole") is something that is simultaneously a whole and a part.

Holon (philosophy)

The word was coined by Arthur Koestler in his book The Ghost in the Machine (1967, p. 48). Koestler was compelled by two observations in proposing the notion of the holon. The first observation was influenced by Nobel Prize winner Herbert A. Simon's parable of the two watchmakers, wherein Simon concludes that complex systems will evolve from simple systems much more rapidly if there are stable intermediate forms present in that evolutionary process than if they are not present.[1] The second observation was made by Koestler himself in his analysis of hierarchies and stable intermediate forms in both living organisms and social organizations.

He concluded that, although it is easy to identify sub-wholes or parts, wholes and parts in an absolute sense do not exist anywhere. A hierarchy of holons is called a holarchy. Jump up ^ Simon, Herbert A. (1969). Second-order cybernetics. Second-order cybernetics, also known as the cybernetics of cybernetics, investigates the construction of models of cybernetic systems.

Second-order cybernetics

It investigates cybernetics with awareness that the investigators are part of the system, and of the importance of self-referentiality, self-organizing, the subject–object problem, etc. Investigators of a system can never see how it works by standing outside it because the investigators are always engaged cybernetically with the system being observed; that is, when investigators observe a system, they affect and are affected by it. Holonomic brain theory. The holonomic brain theory, developed by neuroscientist Karl Pribram initially in collaboration with physicist David Bohm, is a model of human cognition that describes the brain as a holographic storage network.[1][2] Pribram suggests these processes involve electric oscillations in the brain's fine-fibered dendritic webs, which are different than the more commonly known action potentials involving axons and synapses.[3][4][5] These oscillations are waves and create wave interference patterns in which memory is encoded naturally, in a way that can be described with Fourier Transformation equations.[3][4][5][6][7] Gabor, Pribram and others noted the similarities between these brain processes and the storage of information in a hologram, which also uses Fourier Transformations.[1][8] In a hologram, any part of the hologram with sufficient size contains the whole of the stored information.

Holonomic brain theory

Origins and development[edit] Theory overview[edit] 90 Most Influential philosophers of All-Time. Living systems. Some scientists have proposed in the last few decades that a general living systems theory is required to explain the nature of life.[1] Such general theory, arising out of the ecological and biological sciences, attempts to map general principles for how all living systems work.

Living systems

Instead of examining phenomena by attempting to break things down into components, a general living systems theory explores phenomena in terms of dynamic patterns of the relationships of organisms with their environment.[2] Theory[edit] Living systems theory is a general theory about the existence of all living systems, their structure, interaction, behavior and development. This work is created by James Grier Miller, which was intended to formalize the concept of life.

Miller said that systems exist at eight "nested" hierarchical levels: cell, organ, organism, group, organization, community, society, and supranational system. Systems science. Impression of systems thinking about society.

Systems science

Systems science is an interdisciplinary field that studies the nature of complex systems in nature, society, and science itself. It aims to develop interdisciplinary foundations that are applicable in a variety of areas, such as engineering, biology, medicine, and social sciences.[1] Systems science covers formal sciences such as complex systems, cybernetics, dynamical systems theory, and systems theory, and applications in the field of the natural and social sciences and engineering, such as control theory, operations research, social systems theory, systems biology, systems dynamics, systems ecology, systems engineering and systems psychology.[2] Theories[edit] Since the emergence of the General Systems Research in the 1950s,[3] systems thinking and systems science have developed into many theoretical frameworks.

Systems notes of Henk Bikker, TU Delft, 1991. Systems thinking. Impression of systems thinking about society[1] A system is composed of interrelated parts or components (structures) that cooperate in processes (behavior).

Systems thinking

Natural systems include biological entities, ocean currents, the climate, the solar system and ecosystems. Complex system. This article largely discusses complex systems as a subject of mathematics and the attempts to emulate physical complex systems with emergent properties.

Complex system

For other scientific and professional disciplines addressing complexity in their fields see the complex systems article and references. A complex system is a damped, driven system (for example, a harmonic oscillator) whose total energy exceeds the threshold for it to perform according to classical mechanics but does not reach the threshold for the system to exhibit properties according to chaos theory. System dynamics. Dynamic stock and flow diagram of model New product adoption (model from article by John Sterman 2001) System dynamics is an approach to understanding the behaviour of complex systems over time. It deals with internal feedback loops and time delays that affect the behaviour of the entire system.[1] What makes using system dynamics different from other approaches to studying complex systems is the use of feedback loops and stocks and flows.

These elements help describe how even seemingly simple systems display baffling nonlinearity. Overview[edit] System dynamics (SD) is a methodology and mathematical modeling technique for framing, understanding, and discussing complex issues and problems. Systems theory. Autopoiesis. 3D representation of a living cell during the process of mitosis, example of an autopoietic system. The original definition can be found in Autopoiesis and Cognition: the Realization of the Living (1st edition 1973, 2nd 1980): Page 78: - An autopoietic machine is a machine organized (defined as a unity) as a network of processes of production (transformation and destruction) of components which: (i) through their interactions and transformations continuously regenerate and realize the network of processes (relations) that produced them; and (ii) constitute it (the machine) as a concrete unity in space in which they (the components) exist by specifying the topological domain of its realization as such a network. [1] Page 89:- [...] the space defined by an autopoietic system is self-contained and cannot be described by using dimensions that define another space.

Meaning[edit] Criticism[edit] See also[edit] Neuroscience News. In the 1983 movie “A Man with Two Brains,” Steve Martin kept his second brain in a jar. In reality, he had two brains inside his own skull—as we all do, one on the left and one on the right hemisphere. When it comes to seeing the world around us, each of our two brains works independently and each has its own bottleneck for working memory. Normally, it takes years or decades after a brand new discovery about the brain for any practical implications to emerge. But this study by MIT neuroscientists could be put to immediate use in designing more effective cognitive therapy, smarter brain games, better “heads up displays,” and much more. Science express » Exhibition Topics. 001 ON THE WAY TO THE BIG BANGWhy are the laws of nature the way they are? Why did the world not disperse as light during the Big Bang, instead of forming stable matter? How did the Universe expand to its current size?

What determined its speed? How constant are natural constants? 911:Energy - Wikicompany. “All that is, is Light.” - Walter Russell “The Light of God’s equilibrium is my guide. I know its balance, unextended, undivided. Mind–body problem. Different approaches toward resolving the mind–body problem. Chinese room. World view. Intentionality. The Quantum Mystics. Posted by John F. McGowan, Ph.D. in Applied Math, History, Math Education on October 3rd, 2010 | 6 responses The 2004 movie/documentary What the Bleep Do We Know? Has a simple answer to life’s problems: Quantum Mechanics! Can’t get a date? The answer: Quantum Mechanics. Consensus reality. Consensus reality[1][2] is that which is generally agreed to be reality, based on a consensus view.

The difficulty with the question stems from the concern that human beings do not in fact fully understand or agree upon the nature of knowledge or ontology, and therefore it is not possible to be certain beyond doubt what is real.[3][4] Accordingly, this line of logic concludes, we cannot in fact be sure beyond doubt about the nature of reality. Social constructionism. Fundamental Fysiks Group. What Is It Like to Be a Baby: The Development of Thought. Join the increasing number of students enrolling in online college courses and start earning credits towards your degree.

Imagining the Tenth Dimension - A Book by Rob Bryanton. What is the Higgs boson and why does it matter? - physics-math - 13 December 2011. What is the Higgs boson and why does it matter? - physics-math - 13 December 2011. Reconstructing visual experiences from brain activity evoked by natural movies. - GallantLabUCB. 4chan - 404. Energetic Forum - Energetic Science Ministries. Energetic Forum - View Single Post - a better way to present the periodic table.