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First principles of instruction. This article or section is incomplete and its contents need further attention.

First principles of instruction

Some sections may be missing, some information may be wrong, spelling and grammar may have to be improved etc. Use your judgment! 1 Definition. Article: Applying Merrill’s First Principles of Instruction: Practical Methods Based on a Review of the Literature. Pre-publication draft, reference information at end of post.To access PDF copies of this and other articles, visit my Academia.edu page.

Article: Applying Merrill’s First Principles of Instruction: Practical Methods Based on a Review of the Literature

Abstract: Research has shown that when Merrill’s First Principles of Instruction are used as part of an instructional strategy, student learning increases. Several articles describe these principles of Instruction, including specific methods for implementing this theory. However, because teachers and designers often have little time to design instruction, it can be difficult to implement a comprehensive theory like First Principles of Instruction. Therefore, this article provides basic methods for applying First Principles, including several examples from the literature.

First Principles of Instruction. First Principles of Instruction, created by M.

First Principles of Instruction

David Merrill,[1] Professor Emeritus at Utah State University, is an instructional theory based on a broad review of many instructional models and theories.[2] First Principles of Instruction are created with the goal of establishing a set of principles upon which all instructional theories and models are in general agreement, and several authors acknowledge the fundamental nature of these principles.[3] These principles can be used to assist teachers, trainers and instructional designers in developing research-based instructional materials in a manner that is likely to produce positive student learning gains.

The Principles[edit] First Principles of Instruction are described as a set of interrelated principles which, when properly applied in an instructional product or setting, will increase student learning. These principles include the following:[4][5] Research Support[edit] See also[edit] instructional design instructional theory Merrill, M. Quality eToolkit. Ask Learners to Prove They’re Learning with NEXTCHA. Ask Learners to Prove They’re Learning!

Ask Learners to Prove They’re Learning with NEXTCHA

If you’re like most e-learning designers, you’re always keen to explore new ways to deliver engaging and meaningful projects. The question is: what changes in your course will make the biggest impact on the learner? Scenarios, interactivity, visual design? I say, the time’s right to liven up your course’s e-learning wallflower: the Next button! Sad Reality of the Next Button It’s estimated that learners spend thousands of hours a year clicking next buttons. Course designers try all sorts of techniques to force learners to pay attention, like locking down courses and disabling the Next button. Introducing Your Next Next Button: NEXTCHA To engage learners with meaningful interactions, you need a cognitive approach that involves learners and guarantees attention on any course topic.

One of the best ways to reinforce content is through repetition. Repeat After Me… Wait, what’s the CAPTCHA concept? How-to Encourage Online Learners to take Responsibility for their Own Learning. “To single out the institution as being solely responsible for student departure, as do many critics, is to deny an essential principle of effective education, namely that students must themselves become responsible for their own learning”.

How-to Encourage Online Learners to take Responsibility for their Own Learning

(Tinto, 1994) Author Vincent Tinto could have been writing about distance education when he wrote his book Leaving College: Rethinking the Causes and Cures of Student Attrition, but he was writing about the drop-out phenomenon in traditional colleges. Yet this quote is relevant to distance education today, perhaps even more so as educators wrestle with the high drop out rates of some online courses, specifically MOOCs. Five-step Strategy for Student Success with Online Learning. Students that are enthusiastic about online learning cite numerous reasons for preferring the virtual format, yet it’s flexibility that is extolled most often – the ability to study and learn on ‘my time’.

Five-step Strategy for Student Success with Online Learning

Ironically, it is this convenience factor that can cause some online students to procrastinate, or worse fail to engage in the learning process at all, which often leads to students dropping out or performing poorly. As I’ve discussed in previous posts, a key factor to student success in the online environment is self-direction, the capability and willingness to direct one’s own eduction.

Online students, more so than traditional students, need to be independent and take responsibility for their learning. How to Motivate Students in the Online Learning Environment. “Correction does much, but encouragement does more“ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.

How to Motivate Students in the Online Learning Environment

Strategies for Online Instructors: Understanding the Needs of the Online Learner. This is the first post in a four-part series that presents instructional strategies addressing the unique needs of online students.

Strategies for Online Instructors: Understanding the Needs of the Online Learner

In this post I’ll present a model that outlines three distinct learning phases inherent to an online course and how instructors can support the learner through each. Cognitive overload. There is no question that online learners suffer from cognitive overload at the start of an online course. Many learners struggle, are ill-equipped to handle the volume of information inherent to an online course. Frequently, students lack the technical skills needed to navigate through the course itself.

In the virtual environment a unique skill set is required, quite different than what is needed within a face-to-face (F2F) setting. Strategies for Online Instruction: How-to support the Dependent Learner. This is the second post in a four-part series outlining teaching strategies for online instructors that address the unique needs of online students.

Strategies for Online Instruction: How-to support the Dependent Learner

This post describes how to meet the needs of the dependent learner. Welcome weeks are in full swing at college campuses across the country, “Join us for the many activities during Welcome Week 2012! Celebrate your first night on campus with free food, laser tag …” – reads an email message to full-time college students at a well known university.