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Koulouria-Sesame Bread Rings - Souvlaki For The Soul. It’s funny what we recall from our childhood.

Koulouria-Sesame Bread Rings - Souvlaki For The Soul

Like a good little Greek boy I attended church most Sundays and took communion. Do you think I can remember any of the liturgies from my visits to church as a youngster? Nope. What I do remember however was that as soon as I gulped the last of the Holy Communion, I was out of that church treating myself to a koulouri! Not to be confused with the koulouria we make during Easter and other special occasions, these sesame bread rings are a childhood favourite that I only ever used to eat at church. When you think about it it makes perfect sense. You’d be fasting for what seemed like forever, your stomach would be playing hunger tunes and these were a perfect “pick me up” and provided perfect sustenance to break the fast.

I often think about the Greeks who settled here in Australia and the traditional foods they replicated in their new land. As far as I was concerned, koulouria were part and parcel of going to church. Kritsinia (Sesame-Covered Bread Sticks) - KALOFAGAS. When in Greece, you will see Kritsinia in many places/spots as you sight-see, travel through the city or to the countryside.

Kritsinia (Sesame-Covered Bread Sticks) - KALOFAGAS

Kritsinia are bread sticks that often covered in sesame seeds or with an array of edible seeds. You may find Kritsinia at one of the many farmer’s markets that set up in neighborhoods in the city and in towns. They will also be found at patisseries and bakeries: there’s a bakery on almost every corner in Greece at least one in every village. Kritsinia will be found sold on the streets by vendors who will also sell Koulouria, the ringed snack that’s also very popular amongst Greeks.

The periptera (kiosks) that are found on almost every street corner in Greece sell Kritsinia amongst the other snacks, drinks, candy and anything else one can stuff into a grab bag. Bread is an integral part of the Greek diet and I don’t see this changing much in the near future. Kritsinia are not expensive and the variety that’s available seem to expand each time I go to Greece.

Bammy - Immaculate Bites. Golden Charms of Buttery Brioche. Hi there, Buttery Rich Brioche In the kingdom of bread, brioche reigns supreme.

Golden Charms of Buttery Brioche

It has deservedly earned its place on the throne because it is rich in fresh creamery butter which is slowly added to an egg enriched dough. Understandably, some revolt when trying to appease the demands of this dough, because admittedly, it can be torture to work with the gloopy mass. You’ll wonder how you will ever get bread to stop making you its slave. Bread made with lots of butter= pure pleasure However, with time and patience, your loyalty will be rewarded. Bronzed beauty of a Brioche However, since the butter content is so high, it can turn greasy in the blink of an eye… so make sure you work quickly! The crowning glory is pulling a fresh batch of brioche from the oven and devouring it within mere moments (even though I should have heeded the directions and waited out the torturous 20 minutes). Interior Crumb, all toasty and fragrant.

Tsoureki recipe (Traditional Greek Easter bread) Tsoureki recipe – How to make the perfect Greek Easter bread dough It is a common secret, that making your own Greek Easter bread (tsoureki) is quite challenging even for the experienced cooks.

Tsoureki recipe (Traditional Greek Easter bread)

But experience has shown me, that it’s all about having the right recipe. This is a no-fail tsoureki recipe (with all the prep photos) for you to succeed on your first time! Tsoureki dough is all about the rising, which means that the right temperature is key. Once starting to prepare this tsoureki recipe, make sure that all ingredients are at room temperature before using and lukewarm when added in the mixture; this will guarantee that your dough will rise. Ingredients 135g butter, from cow’s milk, at room temperature (4.7 oz.)135g milk, at room temperature (4.7 oz.)200g sugar (7 oz.)4 medium eggs, at room temperature870g bread flour (30 oz.)21g dry yeast (0.7 oz.)100g lukewarm water (3.5 0z.)zest of 1 orange3g ground mastic (0.11 oz.)

For the syrup. Banana Bread Recipe. Print This banana bread has been the most popular recipe on Simply Recipes for over 10 years.

Banana Bread Recipe

Thousands of people make it every day. Why? Because it really is the best banana bread recipe, period. You can mix everything in one bowl, you can vary the amount of sugar or bananas. The beauty of this banana bread recipe is you don’t need a fancy mixer! You can toss in a cup of chopped nuts, raisins, or chocolate chips if you want, or put the batter into muffin tins and make muffins instead. I was given this banana bread recipe years ago from my friend Heidi H, who, many years before, had begged the recipe from a ski buddy’s mother—Mrs. The recipe has been updated with new photos, first posted 2005. No need for a mixer for this recipe! The best bananas to use for banana bread are those that are over-ripe. Ingredients Method Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C), and butter a 4x8-inch loaf pan. Naan - Whitbits Indian Kitchen - Whitbits Indian Kitchen.

I have eaten at many Indian restaurants in the US.

Naan - Whitbits Indian Kitchen - Whitbits Indian Kitchen

What do all these restaurants have in common? Naan is the typical bread that is served. However, when I was in India, I learned that naan is not the everyday bread. Roti or chapati is what is usually ordered at restaurants, and what is served in homes. Of course, living in an Indian household myself, we usually make roti. In order to make a really good naan, you’ve got to let the dough rise. Home.