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Brainbreaks

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Klarar du gåtan som en sexåring löser på sekunder? Från början kommer gåtan från ett intagningsprov för sexåringar till en grundskola i Hongkong (ja, de har intagningsprov till grundskolan).

Klarar du gåtan som en sexåring löser på sekunder?

Barnen hade 20 sekunder på sig att lösa problemet. Många vuxna har lagt ner timmar på att försöka lösa nöten som tar sexåringarna sekunder att knäcka. Det är oklart om sexåringar är smartare än vuxna men helt klart är deras tankemönster annorlunda. Enligt The Guardian formulerades gåtan av gåtmakaren David Bodycombe redan 2002 efter att han sett en parkeringsplats i Portugal. Kan du räkna ut numret på rutan där den parkerade bilen står? ► LÄS MER: Är det här världens sämsta fickparkerare? Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices. When presented with new material, standards, and complicated topics, we need to be focused and calm as we approach our assignments.

Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices

We can use brain breaks and focused-attention practices to positively impact our emotional states and learning. They refocus our neural circuitry with either stimulating or quieting practices that generate increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, where problem solving and emotional regulation occur. Brain Breaks A brain break is a short period of time when we change up the dull routine of incoming information that arrives via predictable, tedious, well-worn roadways. Our brains are wired for novelty. When we take a brain break, it refreshes our thinking and helps us discover another solution to a problem or see a situation through a different lens. 1. I always carry a bag of household objects containing markers, scrap paper, and anything that one would find in a junk drawer -- for example, a can opener or a pair of shoelaces. 10 MORE digital bell-ringer activities to kickstart class (Part 2) Want to kick class off in a meaningful way … AND pull student interest into the lesson?

10 MORE digital bell-ringer activities to kickstart class (Part 2)

Try one of these creative digital bell-ringer activities. (Public domain image via Pixabay.com) We have a golden window of time at the beginning of any class. For these first five or ten minutes of class (OK, probably more the five than the ten), we have our students’ most attention. It’s the most focused they’ll likely be for us all day. If we squander that time, the rest of our time with them suffers. But if we seize the opportunity that it is, we can spark interest and hook students into a lesson. This is why great bell ringers are crucial — quick activities to get students going at the beginning of class, when the bell has just rung. Technology and digital tools give us some unique opportunities to unlock activities that we could do otherwise — or couldn’t do as uniquely.

I recently posted part one of this post — 10 digital bell-ringer activities to kickstart class. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Ring Their Bells: A New Way to Deliver Bell Work. This is the most frequent challenge that I hear from educators in all grade levels (including higher education): "How do I create and sustain engagement?

Ring Their Bells: A New Way to Deliver Bell Work

" When we engage our students from the onset, we reduce negative behaviors while creating experiences that are emotion-packed, drive curiosity, and deliver brain states of anticipation and intrigue. It sounds simple, but for those of us who greet students each day or class period, we encounter a variety of personal experiences, private logics, stressors, learning profiles, and mindsets as intricate and diverse as fingerprints. During the past few years, as I've reentered K-12 classrooms in addition to my undergraduate coursework, I'm learning that how I begin the day or class sets the tone for how well the instruction will be received and the content will be remembered.

This past year, I began looking at research about the primary/recency effect and how I could better engage students the minute they walked through the door each day. 1. Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices. When presented with new material, standards, and complicated topics, we need to be focused and calm as we approach our assignments.

Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices

We can use brain breaks and focused-attention practices to positively impact our emotional states and learning. They refocus our neural circuitry with either stimulating or quieting practices that generate increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, where problem solving and emotional regulation occur. Brain Breaks A brain break is a short period of time when we change up the dull routine of incoming information that arrives via predictable, tedious, well-worn roadways.

Our brains are wired for novelty. When we take a brain break, it refreshes our thinking and helps us discover another solution to a problem or see a situation through a different lens. The Junk Bag: I always carry a bag of household objects containing markers, scrap paper, and anything that one would find in a junk drawer—for example, a can opener or a pair of shoelaces.