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ICTS EDUCATION

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The Ultimate List of Educational Websites. The 5 Emerging Educational Technologies You Should Know about. January31, 2014 The educational landscape is witnessing a drastic change due to the use and integration of emerging technologies. However, though these changes are revolutionary but they are still far from being transformative because the gap between the technologies our students are using out of school and the ones they have access to inside the walls of school is widening. With the emergence and massive uptake of these new emerging technologies, there appeared a new learning culture one which is catalyst of the culture schools should encourage and cultivate.

And until we get past the CIPA act and other inhibiting practices and policies, this gap will keep on widening. Today, I want to share with you this handy infographic that features 5 examples of emerging technologies which have been or are expected to be used in the classroom. These are : Cloud ComputingMobile TechnologyGame Based LearningMOOCsLearning Analytics. 16 Things Teachers Should Try in 2016 [infographic] | Shake Up Learning.

EDpuzzle. Edutopia | K-12 Education Tips & Strategies That Work. 18 Ways iPads Are Being Used In Classrooms Right Now. iPads are quickly becoming a popular and powerful educational tool for classrooms. Beyond the immediate benefit of engaging students, iPads can improve education efficiency and standards. However, many teachers are unsure of how to use them effectively. Coupled with concerns over the costs involved, iPad implementation in schools is seen as an unnecessary and expensive risk. As the case studies below demonstrate, iPads are being used in education environments around the world with great success.

Teachers can have paperless classrooms, take attendance, share interactive presentations and test their students—all on their iPad. So just what are they doing? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Similarly, First Words Animals aids with letter and word identification. 18. Tinkering Space Interview: Megan Schiller. Today I’m joined by Megan Schiller of The Art Pantry, as part of our ongoing series of inspiring conversations that center on how to set up creativity hubs, or tinkerspaces.

If you’re scratching your head because you can’t figure out where to put your child’s art materials, want to turn your laundry room into an art zone, or tend to shift furniture to make room for creative supplies, these interviews are sure to give you food for thought. Megan Schiller is a creative parent with an impressive background in art education, who now runs an amazing online kid-friendly art store called The Art Pantry where she also consults families on how to set up their very own Art Pantry (check out her very generous giveaway at the end of this post). I’ve drooled over pictures of Megan’s child-friendly tinkering space in her Instagram feed and also on her blog, and I asked her if she’d be so kind to share it with us today.

Yay! We’re in for treat. Enjoy this peek into Megan’s Art Pantry… Great question! The Importance of Thinking In- and Out-of-the-Box. How to encourage creativity in a tech-based environment. GUEST COLUMN | by Wendy Marshall How do you teach a student to be creative? It used to be that educators encouraged innovation by telling children to “think outside the box” via a “sky’s the limit” approach. Creativity was viewed as unstructured and a result of not following rules or patterns.

We encouraged students to eschew boundaries and limits, and open themselves up to the endless possibilities. However, it has been found that it is not always practical or beneficial to simply encourage outside-the-box thinking. Having myself been a professional educator for more than 17 years, I’ve seen how classrooms are limited by budget, time and materials, and thinking outside of the box is often not a viable option.

During our summer Makers Camp that is put on by my educational center ExplorOcean, children (ages 9-13) participate in guided projects using tools such as Little Bits, Makey Makeyand Hummingbird robotics. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Educade | Find, create and share lesson plans and teaching tools to empower your classroom. How to Use Recycled Tech Devices as Learning Tools. The idea of dissection in the classroom is nothing new. Science teachers have been delighting (and occasionally sickening) students for decades by giving them hands-on experience with organisms and tools.

What is new, however, is the movement to create un-making spaces in the classroom. Giving kids access to old, broken-down electronics and a safe place to take them apart as they seek to answer why and how things work is an effective and environmentally-friendly teaching technique. Makerspaces and Un-Makerspaces In a recent (excellent) Edutopia article, fifth-grade teacher Scott Bedley describes how he created an un-makerspace. He cites the recent maker movement and a trip to a Maker Faire as his inspiration: “A makerspace is a place for students to take raw materials and create ‘things’ using their imagination. The creativity required and the ‘in-time’ learning that a makerspace provides are powerful. How to Create an Un-Makerspace How to Find Unwanted Electronics Wrapping It Up. Upgrade Your Brain: Resources for Coding Beginners.

Adam Benzion is the founder of Entirely—a Seattle startup focused on social innovation, keen on connecting more people in more places to create special things together. “Everybody in this country should learn to program a computer, because it teaches you how to think.”— Steve Jobs Anyone who’s paying attention these days has probably figured out that computer programming is fast becoming the new standard of literacy in our technology-driven economy. Those with even a rudimentary knowledge of code will probably read this little article and chuckle.

But for me and many other “business types,” not understanding coding has become a real handicap and a growing blind spot. As an intelligent person who’s had a successful career in the software industry and even managed to deliver as technology entrepreneur, I hate feeling left out of certain conversations because I don’t know the language. Everyone is tweaking, hacking, and experimenting. Upgrading your MBA brain is actually fun Spread the word. 10 places where anyone can learn to code. Teens, tweens and kids are often referred to as “digital natives.” Having grown up with the Internet, smartphones and tablets, they’re often extraordinarily adept at interacting with digital technology. But Mitch Resnick, who spoke at TEDxBeaconStreet, is skeptical of this descriptor. Sure, young people can text and chat and play games, he says, “but that doesn’t really make you fluent.”

Mitch Resnick: Let's teach kids to code Fluency, Resnick proposes in this TED Talk, comes not through interacting with new technologies, but through creating them. The former is like reading, while the latter is like writing. He means this figuratively — that creating new technologies, like writing a book, requires creative expression — but also literally: to make new computer programs, you actually must write the code. The point isn’t to create a generation of programmers, Resnick argues. At Codecademy, you can take lessons on writing simple commands in JavaScript, HTML and CSS, Python and Ruby.

The Other 21st Century Skills. Many have attempted to identify the skills important for a learner today in this era of the 21st century (I know it is an overused phrase). I have an affinity towards the skills identified by Tony Wagner: Critical thinking and problem-solvingCollaboration across networks and leading by influenceAgility and adaptabilityInitiative and entrepreneurialismEffective oral and written communicationAccessing and analyzing informationCuriosity and imagination Today I viewed a slideshow created by Gallup entitled, The Economics of Human Development: The Path to Winning Again in Education. Here are some slides from this presentation.

This presentation sparked my thinking about what other skills and attributes would serve the learners (of all ages) in this era of learning. GritResilienceHope and OptimismVisionSelf-RegulationEmpathy and Global Stewardship Grit Students can develop psychological resources that promote grit, tenacity, and perseverance. Resilience. A Librarian's Guide to Makerspaces: 16 Resources. "There were more than 135 million adult makers, more than half of the total adult population in America, in 2015. " What is a makerspace? You’ve no doubt been hearing that word more than a few times over the past several years. Makerspaces, also called hackerspaces, hackspaces, and fablabs, are collaborative spaces where people gather to get creative with DIY projects, invent new ones, and share ideas. Since the first official makerspace convened six years ago in a library in upstate New York, libraries have remained an ideal setting for makerspace events across the country.

Many offer community resources like 3D printers, software, electronics, craft and hardware supplies, and more. The idea of a communal creative space has only gained momentum and become increasingly popular over the years, and the makers’ movement shows no signs of slowing down. There were more than 135 million adult makers, more than half of the total adult population in America, in 2015. 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) 6.) 7.) Beginner’s Guide to Maker-ize An Elementary Classroom – HonorsGradU.

When most penny-pinching, time-crunched, and exhausted teachers hear about lofty ideas like the MakerSpace movement in education, they are likely to dismiss it as another passing and impractical fad. However, the more we investigate, the more convinced we are that there are practical–and profoundly meaningful–ways for teachers to implement its ideals, even in an elementary school classroom. Benefits of Maker Spaces “Makerspaces come in all shapes and sizes, but they all serve as a gathering point for tools, projects, mentors and expertise.

A collection of tools does not define a Makerspace. Rather, we define it by what it enables: making.” They cultivate creativity. (Remember Caine’s Arcade? They provide an opportunity for students to take the lead. They make for a much more productive fast-finisher. They develop essential characteristics. They can “Create a physical laboratory for inquiry-based learning” 4 Realistic Tips to Maker-ize Your Room #2: Look at existing resources. Like this: Eminem would spend hours every night studying the dictionary, so he could expand his vocabulary for his rhymes. - Serious Facts. Top 20 Must-Have Educational iPhone & iPad Apps Used By Real Teachers in the Classroom - iPhone app article - Shara Karasic. With the advent of the 2011/2012 school year, teachers who have access to mobile technology are scrambling to find the best education apps for the iPod Touch, iPad and iPhone.

Educators use apps for everything from communicating with students to inspiring creativity to dissecting virtual frogs. Luckily, we have lots of educators (including Apple Distinguished Educators) on Appolicious who share their lists of the best education apps for elementary, middle school, junior high, and high school. These are the education apps most listed by educators on Appolicious. 1. 3D Brain (iPad, iPhone. Free) Reviewed by educator lmorris: “This is a great learning tool for any student. Subject/Grade: Science (Biology). 4-12. Listed by: Alline, techsupv, and SkylineiPads. 2. Reviewed by educator lmorris: “This is a great app for learning about priceless pieces of art. Subject/Grade: Art. 6-12. Listed by: justatitch, uwcsea and LaurieFowler. 3. Subject/Grade: Language Arts, Math, Science. 4. 5. 6. 6. 7. 8. 9.