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New age and occult

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Been there before? Cosmic consciousness. Multiverse. Baphomet. "Bahomet" redirects here.

Baphomet

It is not to be confused with Bahamut. The 19th century image of a Sabbatic Goat, created by Eliphas Levi. The arms bear the Latin words SOLVE (separate) and COAGULA (join together), i.e., the power of "binding and loosing" usurped from God and, according to Catholic tradition, from the ecclesiastical hierarchy acting as God's representative on Earth.

The original goat pentagram first appeared in the book "La Clef de la Magie Noire" by French occultist Stanislas de Guaita, in 1897. This symbol would later become synonymous with Baphomet, and is commonly referred to as the Goat of Mendes or Sabbatic Goat. Baphomet (/ˈbæfɵmɛt/; from Medieval Latin Baphometh, Baffometi, Occitan Bafometz) is a term originally used to describe an idol or other deity that the Knights Templar were accused of worshiping, and that subsequently was incorporated into disparate occult and mystical traditions. §History[edit] Levitation (paranormal) A representation of a person levitating.

Levitation (paranormal)

Various religions have claimed examples of levitation amongst their followers. Palmistry. Palmistry, or chiromancy (also spelled cheiromancy; from Greek kheir (χεῖρ, ός; “hand”) and manteia (μαντεία, ας; “divination”)), is the claim of characterization and foretelling the future through the study of the palm, also known as palm reading or chirology.

Palmistry

The practice is found all over the world, with numerous cultural variations. Those who practice chiromancy are generally called palmists, palm readers, hand readers, hand analysts, or chirologists. There are many ― often conflicting ― interpretations of various lines and palmar features across various schools of palmistry. These contradictions between different interpretations, as well as the lack of empirical support for palmistry's predictions, contribute to palmistry's perception as a pseudoscience among academics. History[edit] A palm-reader's booth setup outside in Japan. Third eye. A Cambodian Shiva head showing a third eye.

Third eye

In some traditions such as Hinduism, the third eye is said to be located around the middle of the forehead, slightly above the junction of the eyebrows. In other traditions, as in Theosophy, it is believed to be connected with the pineal gland. Tao. Tao or Dao (/taʊ/, /daʊ/; Chinese: 道; pinyin: Dào ) is a Chinese concept signifying 'way', 'path', 'route', or sometimes more loosely, 'doctrine' or 'principle', or as a verb, speak.

Tao

Within the context of traditional Chinese philosophy and religion, Tao is a metaphysical concept originating with Laozi that gave rise to a religion (Wade–Giles, Tao Chiao; Pinyin, Daojiao) and philosophy (Wade–Giles, Tao chia; Pinyin, Daojia) referred to in English with the single term Taoism. Satanism. The downward-pointing pentagram is often used to represent Satanism.

Satanism

Satanism is a broad term referring to a group of social movements comprising diverse ideological and philosophical beliefs. The Celestine Prophecy. The Celestine Prophecy is a 1993 novel by James Redfield, that discusses various psychological and spiritual ideas rooted in multiple ancient Eastern Traditions and New Age spirituality.

The Celestine Prophecy

The main character undertakes a journey to find and understand a series of nine spiritual insights in an ancient manuscript in Peru. The book is a first-person narrative of the narrator's spiritual awakening as he goes through a transitional period of his life. Summary[edit] The book discusses various psychological and spiritual ideas that are rooted in many ancient Eastern Traditions, such as how opening to new possibilities can help an individual establish a connection with the Divine. Masaru Emoto. Masaru Emoto (江本 勝, Emoto Masaru?

Masaru Emoto

, born July 22, 1943) is a Japanese author and entrepreneur, who claims that human consciousness has an effect on the molecular structure of water. Emoto's hypothesis has evolved over the years. Messiah (Derren Brown special) Messiah is a Derren Brown special originally shown on Channel 4 on 7 January 2005 at 21:00.

Messiah (Derren Brown special)

In the episode, Brown travels to the United States to try to convince five influential figures that he has special abilities in their particular field of expertise: psychic powers, Christian evangelism, New Age theories, alien abduction and contacting the dead, with the objective of getting them to endorse him as a practitioner in their field. The concept of the show is to highlight the power of suggestion with regard to beliefs and people's abilities, and failure to question them. Brown makes it quite clear that if any of the subjects accused him of trickery he would immediately come clean about the whole thing, a rule similar to one of the self-imposed rules of the perpetrators of the Project Alpha hoax. Using a false name each time, he succeeds in convincing four "experts" that he has powers, who openly endorsed him as a true practitioner.

List of New Age topics. Orgone. Orgone energy accumulator (with door closed) (with door open) Alternating layers of organic and non-organic materials inside the walls supposedly increase the orgone concentration inside the enclosure relative to the surrounding environment.

Orgone

Reich's theories held that deficits or constrictions in bodily orgone were at the root of many diseases—including cancer—much as deficits or constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses in Freudian theory. Septenary (Theosophy) The Septenary in Helena Blavatsky's teachings refers to the seven principles of man. In The Key to Theosophy[1] she presents a synthesis of Eastern (Advaita Vedanta, Samkhya) and Western (Platonism, 19th century Occultism) ideas, according to which human nature consists of seven principles. These are: Theistic Satanism. The history of theistic Satanism, and assessments of its existence and prevalence in history, is obscured by it having been grounds for execution at some times in the past, and due to people having been accused of it who did not consider themselves to worship Satan, such as in the witch trials in Early Modern Europe.

Most of theistic Satanism exists in relatively new models and ideologies, and many claiming to not be involved with Christianity at all.[4][5][6] Possible history of theistic Satanism[edit] The worship of Satan was a frequent charge against those charged in the witch trials in Early Modern Europe and other witch-hunts such as the Salem witch trials. Satanism and crime[edit] Subtle body. The subtle body in Indian mysticism, from a Yoga manuscript in Braj Bhasa language, 1899, now in the British Library. A subtle body is one of a series of psycho-spiritual constituents of living beings, according to various esoteric, occult, and mystical teachings. Each subtle body corresponds to a subtle plane of existence, in a hierarchy or great chain of being that culminates in the physical form.

Akashic records. Background[edit] Akasha is a Sanskrit word meaning "sky", "space" or "aether", and it entered the language of theosophy through H. P. Blavatsky, who characterized it as a sort of life force; she also referred to "indestructible tablets of the astral light" recording both the past and future of human thought and action, but she did not explicitly identify these as "akashic" in nature.[1] The notion of an akashic record is attributed to Alfred Percy Sinnett, who, in his book Esoteric Buddhism (1884), wrote of a Buddhist belief in "a permanency of records in the Akasa" and "the potential capacity of man to read the same.

"[2][1] By C. Tarot. Visconti-Sforza tarot deck. The Devil card is a 20th-century replacement for the card missing from the original 15th-century deck. Transcendental Meditation technique. Nadi (yoga) Chakra Kundalini Diagram. John Dee. John Dee (13 July 1527 – 1608 or 1609) was a mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, occultist, imperialist[5] and adviser to Queen Elizabeth I.

Magick

Abramelin oil. Abramelin oil, also called Oil of Abramelin, is a ceremonial magic oil blended from aromatic plant materials. Its name came about due to its having been described in a medieval grimoire called The Book of Abramelin written by Abraham the Jew. Thelema. Indigo children. Indigo children, according to a pseudoscientific New Age concept, are children who are believed to possess special, unusual and sometimes supernatural traits or abilities.[4] The idea is based on concepts developed in the 1970s by Nancy Ann Tappe[5] and further developed by Jan Tober and Lee Carroll. Shamanism.

Ascended master. Occult. Emerald Tablet. Grimoire. New Age. Ley line.

Astrology

Kybalion. Cosmobiology. Orion correlation theory. Bikram Yoga. Spirit guide. Five Tibetan Rites. Photon belt. Ananda yoga. Adinkra symbols. Black magic. Azoth. Time slip. Otherkin. Scrying. Flower of Life. Therianthropy. Grand Grimoire. Religion. Necromancy. Pagan and wiccan. Lucid dream.

World as Myth. Aura (paranormal) James Redfield. The Lesser Key of Solomon. Biofeedback. Masters of the Ancient Wisdom (Theosophy) Christian crap. Outline of spirituality. Samhain. Owlman. Lunar effect. Medieval runes. Sethianism. The Man Who Saw Tomorrow. Hermetica. Mindstream. Ouija. Miraculous births. Kabbalah. Elohim. Chakra.

Four Evangelists. Rudolf Steiner. Spiritualism. The World's Sixteen Crucified Saviors. Flatwoods monster. List of asanas. List of occult terms. George Adamski. Dobiel. LGBT topics and Wicca. Astral projection. Out-of-body experience. Second sight. Alternative medicine.