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Privilège blanc - racisme

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Océanerosemarie: «J’ai compris à 35 ans que j’étais blanche» Au lendemain de la Marche de la dignité, qui a eu lieu samedi 31 octobre à Paris (voir l'article et les vidéos du Parisien et les photos de Libération), l'humoriste Océanerosemarie faisait partie des invité.e.s de l'émission Maghreb Orient Express (#MOE) sur TV5Monde, aux côtés de la réalisatrice Baya Kasmi, du chanteur Saad Lamjarred et de la blogueuse Manal Drissi (depuis le Canada).

Océanerosemarie: «J’ai compris à 35 ans que j’étais blanche»

Le thème de l'émission était «Je ne suis pas raciste, mais…». La faute à Ève. Qu’il faut que les femmes aient le même salaire que les hommes pour le même travail, ça me paraît évident.

La faute à Ève

Qu’elles puissent avoir le droit de vote, le droit d’avorter, qu’elles soient traitées en égales, c’est la putain de moindre des choses. Évidemment, il faut se bagarrer pour. Nos ancêtres (merci à elles) se sont déjà bien bagarrées, et elles ont fait un énorme boulot. On est quand même pas si mal loties que ça en France au vingt et unième siècle grâce à elles, même s’il y a encore des combats à mener. This White Feminist Loved Her Dreadlocks – Here's Why She Cut Them Off. I felt the societal pressures of womanhood come on like a plague.

This White Feminist Loved Her Dreadlocks – Here's Why She Cut Them Off

It seemed like one day I was building forts and catching lizards, and the next I was sucking in my gut, picking at my face, and navigating an inescapable shame about my body – a shame that I’ve now spent the last twenty years trying to shirk. I remember being ten years old and grieving my girlhood – that short period of time when I was allowed to exist without a preoccupation of my physical appearance constantly looming in the front of my mind – a time when my self-esteem wasn’t rooted in whether or not I was pretty enough, skinny enough, busty enough, sexy enough. Time passed and the more unattainable and oppressive heteronormative femininity felt, the more I grew to hate myself and everybody around me.

Comprendre le colorblind(ness) Le Blanc est raciste. La fragilité blanche : pourquoi est-ce si dur de parler aux Blancs de racisme ? Je suis blanche.

La fragilité blanche : pourquoi est-ce si dur de parler aux Blancs de racisme ?

J’ai passé des années à étudier ce que cela signifie d’être Blanc dans une société qui proclame l’insignifiance de la race, alors que celle-ci structure profondément la société. Voilà ce que j’ai appris : toute personne blanche vivant aux Etats-Unis va développer des opinions sur la race simplement en baignant dans notre culture. Mais les sources traditionnelles – écoles, manuels scolaires, médias – ne nous fournissent pas les multiples points de vue dont nous avons besoin.

Oui, nous allons développer des opinions chargées d’émotions fortes, mais ce ne seront pas des opinions bien informées. We shouldn’t have to be telling you this. Nantajoong: This is observable globally too.

We shouldn’t have to be telling you this

The US requires cheap, undervalued labor to maintain itself, which is why you have places like Foxconn, like sweatshops, like these under the table factories that treat their workers like shit and pay them pittances for wages and yet still are being used. These countries are targeted by the US so their economies can’t grow so the US can maintain cheap labor. Don’t believe me? Why do you think the US forced an FTA agreement with Korea so forcefully despite widespread protests? Free trade agreements are the innovation that the United States accomplished to reform outdated European-style national colonialism that had become expensive and contributed to the imperial competition that led to two world wars.Rather than have countries outright dominate colonies. the US had the idea to “privatize” colonialism; put it in the hands of banks through the IMF and World Bank.

Having A Color Blind Approach To Racism Is Actually Racist. Racism sucks.

Having A Color Blind Approach To Racism Is Actually Racist

I think we can all agree on that; well, all of us who are aware that it is still a prevalent problem that affects everything from an average jail sentence to whether or not I’m going to be followed around in a clothing store. Unfortunately, some people who see themselves as very progressive and anti-racist are doing more harm for victims of racism than good. The French Approach to “Anti-racism”: Pretty Words and Magical Thinking. I first came to France twelve years ago during my junior year abroad.

The French Approach to “Anti-racism”: Pretty Words and Magical Thinking

I was the first person in my family to get a passport and I could barely contain my excitement. In the winter of 2003, two years before the riots that followed the untimely deaths of 15 year old Zyed Benna and 17 year old Bouna Traore, I landed in Paris bright-eyed and bushy tailed, armed with a very shaky grasp of French and a naive fascination with this beautiful country. As an African-American, I was vaguely aware that France did not deal with issues of race the way we do in the United States.

And when I happened to forget, French white people were keen to remind me. In one of the sociology classes I took at a university in the south of France, I hesitantly raised my hand to ask a question. My new friend was from Cameroon and had moved to France along with her sister and brother several years prior. Zyed Benna and Bouna Traoré, two teenagers who died on October 27th in 2005 after being chased by police officers. Nakkiah Lui: “It’s Not Racism That Australia Needs To Get Rid Of; It’s The Privilege Of Whiteness” By Nakkiah Lui, 3/6/2015 On Friday May 29, the NSW Reconciliation Council brought their sell-out event ‘I’m Not Racist, But…‘ to the University of Sydney, as part of National Reconciliation Week.

Nakkiah Lui: “It’s Not Racism That Australia Needs To Get Rid Of; It’s The Privilege Of Whiteness”

Hosted by Gretel Killeen, the forum’s aim was to generate an open discussion around racism in Australia; it featured ten-minute talks from artist and writer Adam Geczy, writer and screenwriter Benjamin Law, TV host and VJ Yumi Stynes and playwright, writer, and actor Nakkiah Lui, followed by a panel discussion and Q&A. The following speech was given by Nakkiah; republished here with her permission, it has been edited for online.