Writing Systems

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S List of Famous Unsolved Codes and Ciphers. Dorabella Cipher - In 1897, the well-known composer Edward Elgar (of "Pomp and Circumstance" fame) sent an encrypted message to a 23-year-old friend, Miss Dora Penny.

s List of Famous Unsolved Codes and Ciphers

To this day, it still has not been solved. D'Agapeyeff - Alexander d'Agapeyeff wrote an elementary book on cryptography in 1939, entitled "Codes and Ciphers. " In the first edition, he included a challenge cipher. Nobody's solved it, and he embarrassedly admitted later that he no longer knew how he'd encrypted it. Learn to read the Russian Alphabet in 75 Minutes - un knol de David Petherick. You can learn to read Russian in 75 minutes! Key Benefits: Once you have studied this document, you will be able to read Russian and speak Russian! Estimated time to master this is 75 minutes (spend fifteen minutes a day on this for the next five days). The author gave a 75-minute lecture at the Royal Museum of Scotland in 2005, at the end of which, the audience were confidently reading and speaking Russian words.

It's simple... The guide to languages, alphabets and other writing systems. Runic alphabets / Runes / Futhark. Origin Little is known about the origins of the Runic alphabet, which is traditionally known as futhark after the first six letters.

Runic alphabets / Runes / Futhark

In Old Norse the word rune means 'letter', 'text' or 'inscription'. The word also means 'mystery' or 'secret' in Old Germanic languages and runes had a important role in ritual and magic. Here are some theories about the origins of runes: The alphabet was probably created independently rather than evolving from another alphabet. Jawi script. Jawi is one of the two official scripts in Brunei, and is used as an alternate script in Malaysia.

Jawi script

Usage wise, it was the standard script for the Malay language but has since been replaced by a Latin alphabet called Rumi, and Jawi has since been relegated to a script used for religious and cultural purposes. It can be typed with the Jawi keyboard. Day-to-day usage of Jawi is maintained in more conservative Malay-populated areas such as Kelantan in Malaysia and Pattani .[1] Etymology[edit]

Voynich manuscript. The Voynich manuscript is an illustrated codex hand-written in an unknown writing system.

Voynich manuscript

The book has been carbon-dated to the early 15th century (1404–1438), and may have been composed in Northern Italy during the Italian Renaissance.[1][2] The manuscript is named after Wilfrid Voynich, a Polish book dealer who purchased it in 1912.[3] The pages of the codex are vellum. Some of the pages are missing, but about 240 remain. The text is written from left to right, and most of the pages have illustrations or diagrams. The Voynich manuscript has been studied by many professional and amateur cryptographers, including American and British codebreakers from both World War I and World War II.[4] No one has yet succeeded in deciphering the text, and it has become a famous case in the history of cryptography. Arabic chat alphabet. The Arabic chat alphabet, also known as Arabizi (Arabic: عربيزي ‘Arabizi [1]), Arabish, Araby, (Arabic: عربي ‘Araby [2]), or Franco-Arab, or Franco or Roman Arabic or Romanised Arabic or Latin Arabic or Latinised Arabic, is an alphabet used to communicate in the Arabic language over the Internet or for sending messages via cellular phones when the actual Arabic alphabet is unavailable for technical reasons or otherwise more difficult to use.

Arabic chat alphabet

It is a character encoding of Arabic to the Latin script and the Arabic numerals. Users of this alphabet have developed some special notations to transliterate some of the letters that do not exist in the basic Latin script (ASCII).[3] History[edit] During the last decades of the 20th century and especially since the 1990s, Western text communication technologies became increasingly prevalent in the Arab world, such as personal computers, the World Wide Web, email, bulletin board systems, IRC, instant messaging and mobile phone text messaging. Arabic alphabet. The Arabic alphabet (Arabic: أَبْجَدِيَّة عَرَبِيَّة‎ abjadīyah ʻarabīyah) or Arabic abjad is the Arabic script as it is codified for writing the Arabic language.

Arabic alphabet

It is written from right to left, in a cursive style, and includes 28 letters. Because letters usually[1] stand for consonants, it is classified as an abjad. Consonants[edit] Many letters look similar but are distinguished from one another by dots (i‘jām) above or below their central part (rasm). These dots are an integral part of a letter, since they distinguish between letters that represent different sounds.