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Runic alphabets / Runes / Futhark. Little is known about the origins of the Runic alphabet, which is traditionally known as futhark after the first six letters.

Runic alphabets / Runes / Futhark

In Old Norse the word rune means 'letter', 'text' or 'inscription'. The word also means 'mystery' or 'secret' in Old Germanic languages and runes had a important role in ritual and magic. Here are some theories about the origins of runes: The alphabet was probably created independently rather than evolving from another alphabet. Runic writing was probably first used in southern Europe and was carried north by Germanic tribes. Runic magic.

In medieval sources, notably the Poetic Edda, the Sigrdrífumál mentions "victory runes" to be carved on a sword, "some on the grasp and some on the inlay, and name Tyr twice.

Runic magic

" In early modern and modern times, related folklore and superstition is recorded in the form of the Icelandic magical staves. In the early 20th century, Germanic mysticism coins new forms of "runic magic", some of which were continued or developed further by contemporary adherents of Germanic Neopaganism.

Modern systems of runic divination are based on Hermeticism, classical Occultism, and the I Ching. Historical evidence[edit] Tacitus[edit] They attach the highest importance to the taking of auspices and casting lots. It is often debated whether "signs" refers specifically to runes or to other marks; both interpretations are plausible and Tacitus does not give enough detail for a definite decision to be made.[2] Epigraphy[edit] Medieval sources[edit] Oswald the Runemaker - Home Page.

Bibliography : books on the topic of Runes. Stephen Flowers. Stephen Edred Flowers (born May 5, 1953), commonly known as Stephen E.

Stephen Flowers

Flowers, and also by the pen-names Edred Thorsson, and Darban-i-Den, is a former American professor, scholar, runologist, runosophist, goði[1][2] and proponent of occultism, Odianism, esoteric runosophy, Germanic mysticism, Asatru, and Mazdaism, being instrumental in the early establishment of the Germanic Neopagan movement in North America and has also been very active in Left-Hand Path occult organizations. He has over three dozen published books and hundreds of published papers and translations on a disparate range of subjects.

Flowers advocates "Esoteric Runology and runosophy" and "Odianism" (occultist aspects of Germanic Neopaganism).[3] Background[edit] The Bonham, Texas-born scholar was the only son of Betty Jane Eden, daughter of Edred Cosgrove Eden (1888-1945) who is said to belong to the same house as Lord Avon, Anthony Eden, and was a Mason and knight of the KKK. Work[edit] Controversy[edit] References[edit] A Few Words About Edred Thorsson... There are as many opinions about Edred Thorsson as there are readers of his books, and there are plenty of those.

A Few Words About Edred Thorsson...

Rather than take up space in the reading list proper presenting these diverse and often conflicting viewpoints, I thought it best to banish the debate to it's own page. There is no doubt that Edred Thorsson is one of the most prolific and widely-read authors on the subject of the runes. Thorsson is one of the few authors you will find listed in both the academic and mystical sections of this bibliography - his academic books are written under his real name, Stephen E. Flowers. Many academics seem unaware of this fact, condemning him under one name and citing him under the other. My own personal opinion (for what it's worth) is that Thorsson's work is too heavily influenced by Eastern philosophies, ceremonial magic and the Armanan magicians (note that I have removed the offending 'N' word) to be of much use to anyone trying to reconstruct the ancient Norse Pagan traditions.

Runes and Rune Magick. Rune Meaning – Elder Futhark. Rune Meanings - The Elder Futhark. I work with the "Elder Futhark", the runic alphabet which is a composite of the runic symbols most commonly used in northern Europe.

Rune Meanings - The Elder Futhark

The names of the runes of the Elder Futhark are speculative recreations of what linguists call "proto-Germanic", which stems from "proto-Indo-European". There are many versions of the runic alphabets. Each has variations in names, shapes, esoteric meanings and magical uses. One should not mix futharks, or the intent or meaning becomes confused. The Elder Futhark, the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc, and the Younger (or Scandinavian) Futhark are the most frequently seen versions of the runic alphabets in use today. The runes are broken into three sections or groups of eight, called aett (aettir, plural). First the rune name is given, then its phonetic value, its symbolic image, and finally the esoteric meaning used in divination. Fehu(F: Domestic cattle, wealth.)

Uruz: (U: Auroch, a wild ox.) Thurisaz: (TH: Thorn or a Giant.) Ansuz: (A: The As, ancestral god, i.e.