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Balanced news via media bias ratings for an unbiased news perspective

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Related:  AP LangCOLLECTION: Media Literacy and Fake NewsCredibility Assessment ToolkitCurrent EventsUS Gov and Politics

Aristotle’s Ethics 1. Preliminaries Aristotle wrote two ethical treatises: the Nicomachean Ethics and the Eudemian Ethics. He does not himself use either of these titles, although in the Politics (1295a36) he refers back to one of them—probably the Eudemian Ethics—as “ta êthika”—his writings about character.

An Engaging Word Game Helps Students Grasp Implicit Bias As part of an effort to demonstrate the effect of implicit bias, library media specialist Jacquelyn Whiting devised an exercise that looks similar to “Mad Libs,” the popular fill-in-the-blank word game. In EdSurge’s “Everyone Has Invisible Bias. This Lesson Shows Students How to Recognize It,” Whiting describes how she removed words from a New York Times opinion essay to create a new, highly engaging activity for a 10th-grade class. Jacquelyn Whiting

*Civic Online Reasoning If young people are not prepared to critically evaluate the information that bombards them online, they are apt to be duped by false claims and misleading arguments. To help teachers address these critical skills, we’ve developed assessments of civic online reasoning—the ability to judge the credibility of digital information about social and political issues. These assessments ask students to reason about online content. Current Events Sites for Students CNN Student News is one of the most popular sites for student news and current events, but there are many other sites out there that are worth taking a look at. Here are some of the ones that I have used over the last couple of years.KidsPost- This is associated with the Washington Post. This site focuses on important events, but has plenty of fun and entertaining articles as well. PBS NewsHour Extra- News site for students in grades 7-12. This site also includes a searchable database of articles based on topic as well as lesson plans for teachers. National Geographic News- This site is not designed specifically for students, but it is packed with interesting articles that focus on current events around the world.

Using controversy as a teaching tool: An interview with Diana Hess  - kappanonline.org Teaching students how to engage in civil discussions about important issues is even more essential in an environment as polarized and politicized as America is today. By Joan Richardson Kappan: You started your career as a high school social studies teacher in Downers Grove, Ill., which is in suburban Chicago. That was 1979. I wonder, what were your earliest experiences in teaching about controversial topics in that first high school classroom? Diana Hess: I had the good fortune of being hired at a very large school, well over 4,000 students at the time. 155 Words To Describe An Author's Tone Writers Write is your one-stop resource for writers. We have put together this list to help you describe an author’s tone. What is tone? Tone refers to an author’s use of words and writing style to convey his or her attitude towards a topic. What the author feels about the subject is often defined as the tone. What the reader feels is known as the mood.

SIFT (The Four Moves) So if long lists of things to think about only make things worse, how do we get better at sorting truth from fiction and everything in-between? Our solution is to give students and others a short list of things to do when looking at a source, and hook each of those things to one or two highly effective web techniques. We call the “things to do” moves and there are four of them: Stop The first move is the simplest. STOP reminds you of two things.

A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science Click to enlarge A brief detour from chemistry, branching out into science in general today. This graphic looks at the different factors that can contribute towards ‘bad’ science – it was inspired by the research I carried out for the recent aluminium chlorohydrate graphic, where many articles linked the compound to causing breast cancer, referencing scientific research which drew questionable conclusions from their results. The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on. Partisanship, Propaganda, and Disinformation: Online Media and the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election Executive Summary In this study, we analyze both mainstream and social media coverage of the 2016 United States presidential election. We document that the majority of mainstream media coverage was negative for both candidates, but largely followed Donald Trump’s agenda: when reporting on Hillary Clinton, coverage primarily focused on the various scandals related to the Clinton Foundation and emails.

Talking Across Divides: 10 Ways to Encourage Civil Classroom Conversation On Difficult Issues In December, we wrote about the nearly 3,000 comments we received on the issues of immigration, guns, climate and energy, and race, gender and identity, as well as on many other topics suggested by students themselves in our open forum. Take a look at our Ideas for Productive Discussion: Reflections on Our Civil Conversation Challenge to read our observations about the best of those conversations and what made them work, along with unedited student examples for each. 1. Create classroom rules and structures that support respectful and generative discussion, online and off.

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