background preloader

How Google Took Over the Classroom - The New York Times

But that also caused problems in Chicago and another district when Google went looking for teachers to try a new app — effectively bypassing district administrators. In both cases, Google found itself reined in. Unlike Apple or Microsoft, which make money primarily by selling devices or software services, Google derives most of its revenue from online advertising — much of it targeted through sophisticated use of people’s data. Questions about how Google might use data gleaned from students’ online activities have dogged the company for years. “Unless we know what is collected, why it is collected, how it is used and a review of it is possible, we can never understand with certainty how this information could be used to help or hurt a kid,” said Bill Fitzgerald of Common Sense Media, a children’s advocacy group, who vets the security and privacy of classroom apps. Google declined to provide a breakdown of the exact details the company collects from student use of its services. Mr. Mr.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/13/technology/google-education-chromebooks-schools.html

Related:  Week 6: Google: A Deeper Dive (*=Key reading)Week 14: Issues & ChallengesGoogle Suite / All Things GoogleTechnology in EducationAllen's misc. collection

Musings about librarianship: 6 common misconceptions when doing advanced Google Searching As librarians we are often called upon to teach not just library databases but also Google and Google Scholar. Unlike teaching other search tools, teaching Google is often tricky because unlike library databases where we can have insider access through our friendly product support representative as librarians we have no more or no less insight into Google which is legendary for being secretive. Still, given that Google has become synonymous with search we should be decently good at teaching it. Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? - The Atlantic (from Beth) One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was 11—sounding as if she’d just woken up. We chatted about her favorite songs and TV shows, and I asked her what she likes to do with her friends. “We go to the mall,” she said.

Control Alt Achieve: 20 Instant Google Searches your Students Need to Know Google strives to make their search as useful as possible, bringing back the most appropriate results for the terms you entered. Sometimes though Google goes above and beyond the normal list of search results by providing instant search cards at the top of the page. These cards contain the information you searched for, but often also include interactive controls to let you dig deeper, branch off, or experience the information in a more engaging manner. As students learn to become better at searching and researching, many of the instant search cards can be useful to them in a variety of their school subjects. See below for 20 examples of instant searches students can do, the interactive results they get, and ideas for how these could be used to improve learning in school.1) Flip a CoinType - “Flip a Coin”Description - Randomly flips a coin to reveal heads or tails.Uses - Study probability for math Conclusion

Brain Drain: The Mere Presence of One’s Own Smartphone Reduces Available Cognitive Capacity: Journal of the Association for Consumer Research: Vol 2, No 2 We all understand the joys of our always-wired world—the connections, the validations, the laughs … the info. … But we are only beginning to get our minds around the costs. Andrew Sullivan (2016) The proliferation of smartphones has ushered in an era of unprecedented connectivity.

10 Reasons Librarians Are More Important Than Ever Read how these passionate and savvy educators support schools and students every day. It's National Library Week, and we couldn't resist paying homage to one of the most important members of the school community: librarians. Also known as library media specialists, librarians play a unique role in our schools. Often asked to take on a wide range of duties, these passionate and savvy educators deserve more than only a week of praise.

How Does Google Work? Learn How Google Works: Search Engine + AdWords The following infographic was created years ago when Google had a content-first focus on search. In the years since then, the rise of mobile devices has caused Google to shift to a user-first approach to search. We created a newer infographic to reflect the modern search landscape here. Vote on Hacker News, or Net Neutrality: Why School Librarians Should Care On July 12, 2017, the American Library Association (ALA) and nearly 200 other organizations participated in Day of Action, a protest to save Net Neutrality. What is Net Neutrality? It is “ [the] principle, or requirement that Internet service providers should or must treat all Internet data as the same regardless of its kind, source, or destination” (Merriam-Webster). Prohibiting discrimination or preferential treatment by Internet service providers (ISPs) maintains a free and open Internet for all users. Net Neutrality has been a contentious issue both for Internet users wanting an open Internet and Internet service providers trying to institute “tiered service.” The Federal Communications Commission (FCC)) tried over the years to institute rules to protect the principle of Net Neutrality but faced court challenges (FCC, Adopts).

How to Make the Most of Student Video Projects with G Suite Pinterest Classroom Ideas for Making the Most of the New Video Options in Google Slides In this episode, Matt and I go more in-depth with the new video options in Google Slides, as well as share ideas for video projects in the classroom. Listen to this episode to learn how to make the most of student video projects with G Suite, including some ideas for some requested features like audio and narrating Google Slides. We also have some Google news and updates and some other great resources to share.

Related: