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Irish & Celtic Myths / Deities / Stories & fables

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Fables and stories of deities & others.

Stonehenge Rebuilt. How They Rebuilt Stonehenge For decades the official Stonehenge guidebooks have been full of fascinating facts and figures and theories surrounding the world's greatest prehistoric monument.

Stonehenge Rebuilt

What the glossy brochures do not mention, however, is the systematic rebuilding of the 4,000 year old stone circle throughout the 20th Century. The restoration has been kept elusive and a large percentage of vacationers sitting in their hotels in London, planning a trip to the monument, have no idea that they aren't getting the full story. " This is one of the dark secrets of history archaeologists don't talk about: The day they had the builders in at Stonehenge to recreate the most famous ancient monument in Britain as they thought it ought to look. The Irish Tuatha Dé Dannan Connection to the Tribe of Dan. "It is certainly no coincidence that the Irish Gaelic word Dun or Dunn means "Judge," just as Dan does in Hebrew!

The Irish Tuatha Dé Dannan Connection to the Tribe of Dan

" - Raymond McNair The ancient connections between the Irish Tuatha Dé Dannan and the Greek Tribe of Dan have been documented all throughout history. Boudicca, the Celtic Queen that unleashed fury on the Romans. We British are used to women commanders in war; I am descended from mighty men!

Boudicca, the Celtic Queen that unleashed fury on the Romans

But I am not fighting for my kingdom and wealth now. I am fighting as an ordinary person for my lost freedom, my bruised body, and my outraged daughters.... Consider how many of you are fighting — and why! Then you will win this battle, or perish. That is what I, a woman, plan to do! These are the words of Queen Boudicca, according to ancient historian Tacitus, as she summoned her people to unleash war upon the invading Romans in Britain. Early years Little is known about Boudicca's upbringing because the only information about her comes from Roman sources, in particular from Tacitus (56 – 117 AD), a senator and historian of the Roman Empire, and Cassius Dio (155 – 235 AD), a Roman consul and noted historian.

As an adolescent, Boudicca would have been sent away to another aristocratic family to be trained in the history and customs of the tribe, as well as learning how to fight in battle. References. The Celtic Goddess Epona that Rode Swiftly Across the Ancient Roman Empire. Celtic mythology. Overview[edit] Though the Celtic world at its apex covered much of western and central Europe, it was not politically unified nor was there any substantial central source of cultural influence or homogeneity; as a result, there was a great deal of variation in local practices of Celtic religion (although certain motifs, for example the god Lugh, appear to have diffused throughout the Celtic world).

Celtic mythology

Inscriptions of more than three hundred deities, often equated with their Roman counterparts, have survived, but of these most appear to have been genii locorum, local or tribal gods, and few were widely worshipped. However, from what has survived of Celtic mythology, it is possible to discern commonalities which hint at a more unified pantheon than is often given credit. Celtic deities.

The gods and goddesses of the pre-Christian Celtic peoples are known from a variety of sources, including written Celtic mythology, ancient places of worship, statues, engravings, cult objects and place or personal names.

Celtic deities

In characteristic Roman fashion, Caesar does not refer to these figures by their native names but by the names of the Roman gods with which he equated them, a procedure that greatly complicates the task of identifying his Gaulish deities with their counterparts in the insular literatures. He also presents a neat schematic equation of god and function that is quite foreign to the vernacular literary testimony.

Yet, given its limitations, his brief catalog is a valuable witness. General characteristics[edit] Supra-regional cults[edit] Inuit Myth and Legend. Inuit mythology is a repository of Inuit culture, passed down by elders through generations to enrich and enlighten.

Inuit Myth and Legend

My Mother's Story By Solomon Karpik, 1987 (courtesy DINA/PAN 83PR87 29). Inuit mythology is a repository of Inuit culture, passed down by elders through generations to enrich and enlighten. Traditionally used in all aspects of daily life, Inuit mythology has undergone a resurgence in popularity as community groups aim to preserve traditional teachings as a method of cultural and political solidarity.

Mythology and Legend The definition of a myth is as fluid as myths themselves. The Inuit People Inuit who make their homes across the vastness of Canada's Arctic belong to a much larger family that extends from the Bering Sea through Alaska and northern Canada to Greenland. Inuit Mythology Like all mythology, Inuit myths and legends are both entertaining and instructive. Myths and Beings Some Inuit myths are thought-provoking in their deceptive simplicity. Preservation. Irish mythology.

Bunworth Banshee The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity.

Irish mythology

However, much of it was preserved in medieval Irish literature, though it was shorn of its religious meanings. The Druid and Phoenician Coarbs of Ireland. "These Corybantes are the Irish Curbs or Coarbs.

The Druid and Phoenician Coarbs of Ireland

It is not surprising that they came from Phoenicia. " - Sir Godfrey Higgins. IRISH LITERATURE, MYTHOLOGY, FOLKLORE, AND DRAMA.