background preloader

Aldous Huxley

Facebook Twitter

Aldous Huxley Recollected: An Oral History - David K. Dunaway - Google Livros. Brave New World Revisited - Aldous Huxley - Google Livros. Aldous Huxley Oligarchy by drugs and Abe. Aleister Crowley. After an unsuccessful attempt to climb Kanchenjunga and a visit to India and China, Crowley returned to Britain, where he attracted attention as a prolific author of poetry, novels, and occult literature.

Aleister Crowley

In 1907, he and George Cecil Jones co-founded a Thelemite order, the A∴A∴, through which they propagated the religion. After spending time in Algeria, in 1912 he was initiated into another esoteric order, the German-based Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO), rising to become the leader of its British branch, which he reformulated in accordance with his Thelemite beliefs. Through the OTO, Thelemite groups were established in Britain, Australia, and North America. He spent the First World War in the United States, where he took up painting and campaigned for the German war effort against Britain, later revealing that he had infiltrated the pro-German movement at the behest of the British intelligence services. Early life[edit] Youth: 1875–94[edit] Cambridge University: 1895–98[edit] Had! [edit] Brave New World Revisited (1958) by Aldous Huxley.

Contents Foreword I Over-PopulationII Quantity, Quality, Morality III Over-Organization IV Propaganda in a Democratic Society V Propaganda Under a Dictatorship VI The Arts of Selling VII Brainwashing VIII Chemical Persuasion IX Subconscious Persuasion X Hypnopaedia XI Education for Freedom XII What Can Be Done?

Brave New World Revisited (1958) by Aldous Huxley

Foreword The soul of wit may become the very body of untruth. However elegant and memorable, brevity can never, in the nature of things, do justice to all the facts of a complex situation. On such a theme one can be brief only by omission and simplification. But life is short and information endless: nobody has time for everything. The subject of freedom and its enemies is enormous, and what I have written is certainly too short to do it full justice; but at least I have touched on many aspects of the problem. I. In 1931, when Brave New World was being written, I was convinced that there was still plenty of time. Moreover, the yearly increases are themselves in­creasing. The Aquarian Conspiracy. In the spring of 1980, a book appeared called The Aquarian Conspiracy that put itself forward as a manifesto of the counterculture.

The Aquarian Conspiracy

Defining the counterculture as the conscious embracing of irrationality—from rock and drugs to biofeedback, meditation, "consciousness-raising," yoga, mountain climbing, group therapy, and psychodrama. The Aquarian Conspiracy declares that it is now time for the 15 million Americans involved in the counterculture to join in bringing about a "radical change in the United States. " Writes author Marilyn Ferguson: "While outlining a not-yet-titled book about the emerging social alternatives, I thought again about the peculiar form of this movement; its atypical leadership, the patient intensity of its adherents, their unlikely successes. It suddenly struck me that in their sharing of strategies, their linkage, and their recognition of each other by subtle signals, the participants were not merely cooperating with one another.

They were in collusion. Aldous Huxley: Man's Almost Infinite Appetite For Distractions.       Man's Almost Infinite Appetite For Distractions.

Aldous Huxley: Man's Almost Infinite Appetite For Distractions.      

By Aldous Huxley “In regard to propaganda the early advocates of universal literacy and a free press envisaged only two possibilities: the propaganda might be true, or the propaganda might be false. They did not foresee what in fact has happened, above all in our Western capitalist democracies - the development of a vast mass communications industry, concerned in the main neither with the true nor the false, but with the unreal, the more or less totally irrelevant. In a word, they failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions. In the past most people never got a chance of fully satisfying this appetite.

In "Brave New World" non-stop distractions of the most fascinating nature are deliberately used as instruments of policy, for the purpose of preventing people from paying too much attention to the realities of the social and political situation.