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HeadlineSpot.com: US Newspapers Online News Headlines, World News, Current Events. Five Laws of MIL. Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy We are travelling towards the universality of books, the Internet and all forms of “containers of knowledge”.

Five Laws of MIL

Media and information literacy for all should be seen as a nexus of human rights. Therefore, UNESCO suggests the following Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy. They are inspired by the Five Laws of Library Science proposed by S. R. For more context to the Five Laws of MIL, please see related chapter in the MIL Yearbook 2016 published by UNESCO, Media and Information Literacy: Reinforcing Human Rights, Countering Radicalization and Extremism.

Law One. Search Google Effectively In The Classroom – TeachBytes. Recently in one of my classes, I learned about Google search optimization, or how to search more effectively.

Search Google Effectively In The Classroom – TeachBytes

It really opened my eyes to how ineffectively I was utilizing the search engine before, and how I could use tricks and tips to save valuable time when looking for information online. The main “must-know” tips are well explained in the Google-created images below: Database Title Lists - Database Title Lists - Gale. Gale provides title lists in Excel and TXT formats for most of its products following the KBART (Knowledge Base and Related Tools) Recommended Practice along with other standard formats (XLS, XLSX, HTML, CSV, and XML).

Database Title Lists - Database Title Lists - Gale

Some Gale products are not tied to KBART lists; these products are shown in Additional Gale Title Lists. KBART establishes guidelines for the timely exchange of metadata between content providers and knowledge base developers, and helps improve data exchange. More about KBART Schema for XML Title List Reports If you have questions or comments about the Title Lists, send an e-mail to gale.contentQA@cengage.com. For Gale policy information, please read the Embargo and Refereed (Peer Review) policy pages. Sign in - Gale Support - Gale. 3 types of Searches. DUDENEY1. What is a Keyword? - Keyword vs. Subject: Two Types of Searching - Research Guides at Tidewater Community College. Keyword Searching When you first begin researching a topic in a library database, such as Academic Search Complete, you'll probably want to start off with a keyword search.

What is a Keyword? - Keyword vs. Subject: Two Types of Searching - Research Guides at Tidewater Community College

The Hardest Type of Web Search for Students. There are three basic types of searches that students conduct on the Internet.

The Hardest Type of Web Search for Students

Those types of searches are navigational, transactional, and informational. Navigational searches are conducted to find something specific like a website or physical location. Transactional searches are conducted for the purpose of trying to purchase something. Informational searches are conducted to discover information about a topic. Of these three types of searches informational searches are the ones that students struggle with the most. Five strategies that help students conduct better informational searches. 1. Research Tips: Primary, secondary and tertiary sources.

Using Primary, secondary and Tertiary Sources in Research Let’s say you are writing a research paper on the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) of 1972, but you are unfamiliar with it.

Research Tips: Primary, secondary and tertiary sources

A good place to gather a general idea or understanding of the ERA would be a tertiary source, such as Wikipedia or the Encyclopedia Brittanica. There, you can read a summary of events on its history, key people involved, and legislation. To find more in-depth analysis on the Equal Rights Amendment, you consult a secondary source: the nonfiction book Why We Lost the ERA by Jane Mansbridge and a newspaper article from the 1970s that discuss and review the legislation. These provide a more focused analysis of the Equal Rights Amendment that you can include as sources in your paper (make sure you cite them!). How to Search in Google: 31 Advanced Google Search Tips.

If you’re like me, you probably use Google many times a day.

How to Search in Google: 31 Advanced Google Search Tips

But chances are, unless you're a technology geek, you probably still use Google in its simplest form. The advanced Google searches every student should know. Google has amazing tools for finding school-worthy sources.

The advanced Google searches every student should know

Too bad most kids don’t know they exist “Did he seriously just ask that? How old is this guy?” Well yes, I recently seriously just asked a group of students if they knew how to search Google. And yes, the students got a good laugh from my question. “Of course I know how to use Google,” I have been told by every student to whom I have asked the question. Teach your students the right way to Google. Kelly Maher November 24th, 2014 In the age of the split-second Google search, it’s more critical than ever to train students to distinguish between primary and secondary sources As in decades past, proper research methods are an essential skill for today’s students.

Teach your students the right way to Google

At a time when most students (and adults, for that matter) are accustomed to heading straight to Google to answer all of their questions, being able to sagely sift through the good, the bad, and the ugly of search results is key to creating independent 21st century thinkers. eSchool News The advanced Google searches every student should know. Community Site. Choose the Best Search for Your Information Need. Internet country domains list / Country Internet codes / TLDs - World Standards. NCWOToolkit - home. 10 Google Search Tips for Students. Teach your students the right way to Google. Kelly Maher November 24th, 2014 Alan November and Brian Mull take an interesting approach to assessing the reliability of online sources in their article “Web Literacy Where the Common Core Meets Common Sense.”

Teach your students the right way to Google

To get students thinking beyond the surface of what they read, the authors suggest teachers have their students use Google to search for images of “ear mouse,” and then read two articles about this rodent. The first article, “Artificial liver ‘could be grown’,” comes from the BBC, a trusted news source. The second account, “Vacanti mouse,” appeared on Wikipedia. The inconsistencies within the articles are readily identifiable. Spoiler alert, with further research students will find that the ear was not actually a human ear that was grown on the back of the mouse, as the BBC originally reported, but was instead ear shaped cartilage (derived from a cow) that was implanted on the mouse’s back.

Search Education – Google. MicroModules. Search engine and human edited web directory KartOO.