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A Complete History Of Marvel's Anti-Marijuana Comic Fastlane. If you were reading Marvel Comics in 1999, you read Fastlane.

A Complete History Of Marvel's Anti-Marijuana Comic Fastlane

For four solid months, it was absolutely unavoidable, an eight-page anti-marijuana insert that would pop up right in the middle of every single Marvel Comic to let you know about the dangers of weed, a drug that was glorified in the media and would lead users to a dangerous world of addiction and deadly hallucinations that was so over the top even the producers of Dragnet thought that maybe they should tone it down a little.

And if you’re a certain kind of person who was reading Marvel Comics in the ’90s, you actually kind of love it. I mean, I do. The Background The weird thing about Fastlane — well, let’s be honest here, one of the many weird things about Fastlane, but probably the one everyone remembers — is that it was absolutely everywhere. Turns out, I didn’t need to bother. Fastlane, though, remains the centerpiece of the book. How It Came Together The Drug Stuff Doing The Job Gregg Schigiel: It was a great gig. Part 1: My Two &*%$#!!! Questions for Romney and Obama. Presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Barack Obama recently answered 14 science-related questions put to them by Scientific American and ScienceDebate.org.

My Two &*%$#!!! Questions for Romney and Obama

This exchange left me wanting more. If I had the candidates locked in a room with me, I’d ask them two questions: What the $%&*#!!! You gonna do about the obscenely big gap between rich and poor Americans? Over the past few decades the gap between rich and poor and the U.S. has reached Grand Canyon proportions, triggering complaints from prominent scholars and pundits as well as Occupy Wall Streeters. Inequality is measured by the so-called Gini index (invented by statistician Corrado Gini).

Let’s disregard the morality of inequality and just consider the issue from a public-health perspective. Wilkinson and Pickett analyzed 23 nations, most in Europe, as well as the U.S., Canada, Singapore, New Zealand and Israel. What the %$&#@!!! Republicans and Democrats alike tout the economic benefits of the military-industrial complex. Mymusix.com. Q: I have Windows Vista and my PC does not recognize my PD-6070.

mymusix.com

A: For customers who have Windows Vista, please go to this link: Vista Instructions and follow the instructions on how to get Vista to recognize the PD-6070. Q: My Computer does not recognize my PD-6070. Why? A: The PD-6070 with Windows XP should be recognized as a 'Audio Player' under 'My Computer' which is a MTP device when using Windows XP and Windows Media Player 10 or 11. With older versions of Windows, or older versions of Windows Media Player, it will be recognized as a 'Removable Disk' a MSC device instead. Here are some suggestions for recognition issues. Please try the USB ports on the back of the PC. Upgrade your computer with the latest version of Windows Media Player available for your operating system.

Also, please check your Device Manager to make sure it is not a issue with Windows. Uninstall the PD-6070 via device manager. Select 'Uninstall'. Q: I have Windows 98. A: Please follow the steps below: 1. 2. 3. 4. What Restaurant Has Portland's Best Happy Hour? - Friday Open Threads. Friday, January 18, 2013, by Erin DeJesus It's Friday and time to hear from the crowd.

What Restaurant Has Portland's Best Happy Hour? - Friday Open Threads

Have something you want discussed among the fine Eater readers? Send it this way. To the chagrin of many a restaurateur, happy hour in Portland is a culture all its own. For this week's Friday Open Thread, we pose the question: What restaurant — bars exempted — has the best happy hour in Portland? As per usual, we'll compile the comments left there and sent into the tipline into a handy map that will hopefully act as a must-visit happy hour guide. How Booze Built America: The Drinker's Dictionary. The Smiths - Live at The Hacienda. Michael Lewis: Obama’s Way.

Obama was 20 or more years older than most of them, and probably not as physically gifted, though it was hard to say because of the age differences.

Michael Lewis: Obama’s Way

No one held back, no one deferred. Guys on his team dribbled past him and ignored the fact he was wide open. When he drives through the streets, crowds part, but when he drives to the basket large, hostile men slide over to cut him off. It’s revealing that he would seek out a game like this but even more that others would give it to him: no one watching would have been able to guess which guy was president. As a player on the other team, who must have outweighed Obama by a hundred pounds, backed the president of the United States down and knocked the crap out of him, all for the sake of a single layup, I leaned over to the former Florida State point guard. “No one seems to be taking it easy on him,” I said. “If you take it easy on him, you’re not invited back,” he explained. “Who’s Rey?” “Where’s Rey?” “Rey hasn’t been back.” Nesbitt hooted. Greed and Debt: The True Story of Mitt Romney and Bain Capital.

11 facts about the Affordable Care Act. In the past week, both Alec MacGillis and Sabrina Tavernise have written articles touching on how little the uninsured actually know about the Affordable Care Act.

11 facts about the Affordable Care Act

Given that polling shows the law remains unpopular even as its component parts -- with the notable exception of the individual mandate -- are very popular, it seems they're not alone. So here's a refresher on some of the law's most significant policies and consequences: 1. By 2022, the Congressional Budget Office estimates (pdf) the Affordable Care Act will have extended coverage to 33 million Americans who would otherwise be uninsured. Here's the graph: 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. The ACA's taxes and spending cuts make it a slight deficit reduce in its first decade. 10. 11. Acknowledgments: Much of the information in this post comes from the Kaiser Family Foundation's excellent summary of the Affordable Care Act's provisions.

14 reasons why this is the worst Congress ever. Click to view gallery: The 112th Congress is a no good, very bad, terrible Congress. (Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg) This week, the House of Representatives voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. On its own, such a vote would be unremarkable. Republicans control the House, they oppose President Obama’s health reform law, and so they voted to get rid of it.

But here’s the punchline: This was the 33rd time they voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Holding that vote once makes sense. Well, it makes you the 112th Congress. Hating on Congress is a beloved American tradition. 1. Let's start with the simplest measure of congressional productivity: the number of public bills passed into law per Congress. The 112th Congress — this Congress — is the last bar on the right.

Now you may say that this simply reflects divided government. 2. (PHOTO GALLERY: Our unpopular Congress) 3. So what does it say about this Congress? VoteView.com 4. Early in the year, the economy seemed to be gathering momentum. 5. 21 Pictures That Will Restore Your Faith In Humanity. Oregon Rep. Jefferson Smith speaks at UO graduation. Presidential Biographer Edmund Morris - Serious Jibber-Jabber with Conan O'Brien. "You Might Be Screwed": Excerpts from Jefferson Smith's U of O Commencement Speech. Amanda Caffal I'm not going to post the whole thing, but we got a copy of the speech that mayoral candidate Jefferson Smith gave to the University of Oregon's class of 2012 yesterday morning.

"You Might Be Screwed": Excerpts from Jefferson Smith's U of O Commencement Speech

But some of it's definitely worth sharing. The message? Graduates should embrace the lousy economy, with its paucity of high-paying, ego-boosting jobs, as a chance to cast off the myth of the career ladder and follow in Smith's own footsteps: public service. I know I’m supposed to come and tell you about the many opportunities before you. After the jump, read about a Satori-like experience Smith had at a New York City McDonald's. I wanted to go to law school, and I got into the best one I could. Gary Kovacs: Tracking the trackers. Occupy ALL the Updates!! Occupy Wall Street plus Anonymous may equal city computer outages.

8 Reasons Young Americans Don't Fight Back: How the US Crushed Youth Resistance. The ruling elite has created social institutions that have subdued young Americans and broken their spirit of resistance.Bruce E.

8 Reasons Young Americans Don't Fight Back: How the US Crushed Youth Resistance

LevineAlterNet Traditionally, young people have energized democratic movements. So it is a major coup for the ruling elite to have created societal institutions that have subdued young Americans and broken their spirit of resistance to domination. Young Americans—even more so than older Americans—appear to have acquiesced to the idea that the corporatocracy can completely screw them and that they are helpless to do anything about it. A 2010 Gallup poll asked Americans “Do you think the Social Security system will be able to pay you a benefit when you retire?” How exactly has American society subdued young Americans? 1. Today in the United States, two-thirds of graduating seniors at four-year colleges have student-loan debt, including over 62 percent of public university graduates. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

The Secret of Oz - Winner, Best Docu of 2010 v.1.09.11. WEDNESDAY READ. By Matt Taibbi, Rolling Stone A good friend of mine sent me a link to a small story last week, something that deserves a little attention, post-factum.

WEDNESDAY READ

The Bloomberg piece is about J.P. Morgan Chase winning a bid to be the lead underwriter on a $400 million bond issue by the state of Massachusetts. Chase was up against Merrill for the bid and won the race with an offer of a 2.57% interest rate, beating Merrill’s bid of 2.79. The difference in the bid saved the state of Massachusetts $880,000. Afterward, Massachusetts state treasurer Steven Grossman breezily played up the benefits of a competitive bid. Well … so what, right? Correct. Nationwide, about 20 percent of debt issued by states and local governments is sold through competitive bids.

By “negotiated underwriting,” what Bloomberg means is, “local governments just hand the bid over to the bank that tosses enough combined hard and soft money at the right politicians.” […] READ @ By Washington’s Blog Is the Tide Turning on SOPA? READ @ By RT.