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Scientists Find Tequila Plants Hold the Key to Surviving Global Warming. What tastes great in a margarita, can be either smoky or smooth, and may hold the key to how plants of the future will survive global warming?

Scientists Find Tequila Plants Hold the Key to Surviving Global Warming

You might not have known the last one, but the first two give it away, right? It’s Agave. We’re talking about agave. That’s right. Intact mushroom and mycophagous rove beetle in Burmese amber leak early evolution of mushrooms – HeritageDaily. New research investigating the transition of the Sahara from a lush, green landscape 10,000 years ago to the arid conditions found today, suggests that humans may have played an active role in its desertification.

Intact mushroom and mycophagous rove beetle in Burmese amber leak early evolution of mushrooms – HeritageDaily

The desertification of the Sahara has long been a target for scientists trying to understand climate and ecological tipping points. A new paper published in Frontiers in Earth Science by archeologist Dr. David Wright, from Seoul National University, challenges the conclusions of most studies done to date that point to changes in the Earth’s orbit or natural changes in vegetation as the major driving forces. “In East Asia there are long established theories of how Neolithic populations changed the landscape so profoundly that monsoons stopped penetrating so far inland”, explains Wright, also noting in his paper that evidence of human-driven ecological and climatic change has been documented in Europe, North America and New Zealand.

Earth - Real-life zombies that are stranger than fiction. The zombies we know from fiction are ferocious, flesh-eating post-humans.

Earth - Real-life zombies that are stranger than fiction

And while such stories have never come true, nature is full of disturbingly similar cases of zombification among plants and animals. Sometimes the parallels are striking. The Way Cashews Grow Is Mildly Shocking If You've Never Seen It Before. Ophiocordyceps unilateralis - Wikipedia. O. unilateralis and related species are known to engage in an active secondary metabolism, among other reasons, for the production of substances active as antibacterial agents that protect the fungus-host ecosystem against further pathogenesis during fungal reproduction.

Ophiocordyceps unilateralis - Wikipedia

Because of this secondary metabolism, an interest in the species has been taken by natural products chemists, with corresponding discovery of small molecule agents (e.g. of the polyketide family) of potential interest for use as human immunomodulatory, antiinfective, and anticancer agents. Systematics[edit] The scientific name is sometimes written Ophiocordyceps unilateralis sensu lato, which means "in the broad sense". This is because the species is actually a complex of many species within O. unilateralis.[4] Morphology[edit] Life cycle[edit] Like other fungi pathogenic to insects in the Ophiocordyceps genus, O. unilateralis targets a specific host species, the Camponotus leonardi ant. Geographic distribution[edit] Remembering Plants – The Brains Blog.

Perceiving Plants – The Brains Blog. In What a Plant Knows, Daniel Chamowitz reports what plant biologists apparently have known for a long time: although plants generally stay in one place (they’re sessile), they actively negotiate their environments.

Perceiving Plants – The Brains Blog

Not just their cells, like all living cells, constantly do things, but whole plants and their parts—their roots, shoots, and leaves—respond to their environment. For instance, plants use sunlight to convert water and carbon dioxide into energy. But plants don’t just get or fail to get sunlight. 15 of the World’s Funkiest Fungi. When it comes to the natural world, fungi are (truly) in a kingdom all their own.

15 of the World’s Funkiest Fungi

They help humans brew tasty beverages like beer, they recycle nutrients from dead plants and animals, and they provide nutrients for trees. Of course there are others that destroy food crops and kill any humans who accidentally ingest them. You never know what you’re going to get with fungus. In celebration of their weird and wonderful world, here are 15 fungi that will blow your mind (some of them in a literal sense). Hidden underground in Malheur National Forest, Oregon lives a creature so large it makes the blue whale look small. This blister-like fungus grows on decaying logs and fallen branches, looking flat and rougher in dry conditions and swollen after rain. One of the more disgusting-looking fungi of the world might cause concern for hikers who stumble across it. There are plenty of fungi that exhibit bioluminescence, but this particular species from Southeast Asia is the oldest known example.

Mushrooms May Really Be Magic After All. History, Travel, Arts, Science, People, Places. Foraging for Edible Plants: Purslane GF Video - GardenFork.TV - DIY Living. Purslane - Weed It or Eat It? - The Homeowners Column - University of Illinois Extension serving Champaign, Ford, Iroquois and Vermilion Counties. Is it a weed or a wonderful taste treat?

Purslane - Weed It or Eat It? - The Homeowners Column - University of Illinois Extension serving Champaign, Ford, Iroquois and Vermilion Counties

Purslane is cursed and curried all at the same time. For most of us, it comes as an unwelcome guest. Purslane, Portulaca oleracea, is probably in your garden right now but not because you invited it to dinner. Purslane is native to India and Persia and has spread throughout the world as an edible plant and as a weed. Pitcher plant in France eats bee-killing Asian hornets. Bee-killing Asian hornets spreading across Europe now face a natural enemy that lures them to destruction - a carnivorous North American plant, French experts say. The head of a botanical garden in Nantes, western France, says the pitcher plant Sarracenia devours Asian hornets - but not European hornets. Nor does it eat bees or wasps. Romaric Perrocheau recently found a Sarracenia stem full of dead hornets. Asian hornets are a menace to beehives. Smells Fishy: Putrid 'Corpse Flower' Blooms. The place smells like death, but that didn't keep crowds away from the UC Botanical Garden in Berkeley, California, this weekend.

Smells Fishy: Putrid 'Corpse Flower' Blooms

More than 2,300 visitors queued up on Saturday (July 25) to meet Trudy, an enormous "corpse flower" that was in bloom. Corpse flowers (Amorphophallus titanum, which means "giant, misshapen penis") burst into enormous purple-and-yellow blooms only once every few years. Golden State Joe: California Makes A Play For Coffee's Future. Jay Ruskey grows coffee next to avocados on his farm, Good Land Organics, in Goleta, Calif.

Golden State Joe: California Makes A Play For Coffee's Future

The two crops are often grown together in Central America, partly because they can share fertilizer and water. Lisa Morehouse/KQED hide caption itoggle caption Lisa Morehouse/KQED Jay Ruskey grows coffee next to avocados on his farm, Good Land Organics, in Goleta, Calif. The two crops are often grown together in Central America, partly because they can share fertilizer and water. Lisa Morehouse/KQED Coffee has been grown since at least the 13th century in places such as Indonesia, Ethiopia and Central and South America. Michael Pollan: How Smart Are Plants? African dust once fertilized the Everglades. Numerous water lilies and other aquatic flowers once dotted the grass carpets of Florida’s Everglades thanks to nutrient-bearing dust from Africa.

African dust once fertilized the Everglades

Windblown sediment from the Sahara Desert landed in Florida around 4,600 years ago and enriched its nutrient-poor wetlands, scientists report October 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. But an abrupt shift in winds around 2,800 years ago downsized the dust dump and stifled the nutrient flow, the authors suggest. The discovery of airborne fertilizer revises scientists’ understanding of the history and workings of the Everglades. Previously, most scientists thought the Everglades had been undernourished until nutrient-rich runoff from human development and agriculture began to seep in over the last century. Sheep-Eating Plant Blooms For First Time; Puya Chilensis Started Growing 15 Years Ago (PHOTOS) How We Unwittingly Bred The Phytonutrients Out Of Our Food. Studies published within the past 15 years show that much of our produce is relatively low in phytonutrients, which reduce the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and dementia.

The loss of these beneficial nutrients did not begin 50 or 100 years ago. How Plants Help Each Other Grow By Near-Telepathic Communication. Michael Forrester, Prevent DiseaseWaking Times Plants have scientifically been show to draw alternative sources of energy from other plants. Plants influence each other in many ways and they communicate through “nanomechanical oscillations” vibrations on the tiniest atomic or molecular scale or as close as you can get to telepathic communication. Members of Professor Dr. Studying Seemingly Immortal Lichens, in a Place for the Dead.