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AWI Causes (4) (1770-76)

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(4) Events 1770-76. VID: Declaration of Independence. Last revised: March, 2014 Acceptance of Terms Please read this Terms of Service Agreement ("Terms of Service", "Terms of Use") carefully. These terms apply to Education Portal and its related websites owned and operated by Remilon, LLC ("Education Portal,", "Site", "Sites", "our", "us"). Education Portal provides the Services, which are defined below, to you subject to the following Terms of Service, which may be updated by us from time to time without notice to you. YOU AGREE THAT BY USING THE SERVICE YOU REPRESENT THAT YOU ARE LEGALLY ABLE TO ENTER INTO THIS AGREEMENT AND YOU CERTIFY TO EDUCATION PORTAL THAT: (i) you are at least eighteen (18) years of age, or an emancipated minor, or possess legal parental or guardian consent.

Privacy Policy Education Portal respects your privacy and permits you to control the treatment of your personal information. Terms Applicable to All Services We continually update the Education Portal service, including the course and content library. A. I. B. I. VID: Declaration of Independence (John Adams biopic) Pulling down statue of George III in Bowling Green, NY (1859 painting) Pulling Down the Statue of George III | Teach US History. Image Show sections: Original Background Curator Notes Background Notes Artist: John C.

McRae was an engraver and printer in New York City (1) who based this engraving off of a painting by Johannes Adam Simon Oertel (1823-1909). Oertel was a painter and engraver who emigrated from Germany in 1848. He is known for his religious paintings and for his ceiling decorations at the House of Representatives in Washington. (2) On July 9, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was read for the first time in New York in front of George Washington and his troops. This engraving, and the painting that it is based upon, show a very romanticized version of the event. This incident was symbolic because it showed that Americans were ready to be independent and free from tyrannical rule, but also by pulling down a statue of the King, it was a symbolic gesture to make historic change from the rule of a monarchy to the rule of a democracy. (7) (1) Groce, George C. and David H.

. (2) Groce, 476. (6)Marks, 61-62. VID: George III on America. Freeman Vid 11 - Independence. Freeman 10 - Common Sense. Common Sense, Section 3, (Thoughts on the Present State of American Affairs), Paine. Stephen Sayre "plot"? Stephen Sayre (1736–1818) was a member of a thousand-strong American community living in London at the time of the outbreak of the War of Independence in 1775. A close associate of John Wilkes, the radical Lord Mayor of London, Sayre, a merchant and a city sheriff, is alleged to have planned to kidnap George III with the help of the London mob. The King was to be taken to the Tower of London, before being bundled off to his ancient patrimony in Hanover. Details of this improbable scheme were revealed to the British government in October 1775 by Lord Rochford, the minister responsible for domestic security.

It was a time of acute political tension, and the authorities were already alert to the possibility of some form of subversive action. In the Proclamation of Rebellion, issued in the autumn, the population was asked to be aware of "diverse wicked and desperate Persons", and asked to inform the authorities of any "traitorous Conspiracies and Attempts against Us, Our Crown and Dignity. " Proclamation for Suppressing Rebellion and Sedition by King George III. King George III August 23, 1775 Given at our Court at St.

James’s the twenty-third day of August, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, in the fifteenth year of our reign. GOD save the KING. Share This. King George III (montage set to music) Freeman Vid 12 - Civil War. Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. The Battle of Bunker Hill took place on June 17, 1775, mostly on and around Breed's Hill, during the Siege of Boston early in the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after the adjacent Bunker Hill, which was peripherally involved in the battle and was the original objective of both colonial and British troops, and is occasionally referred to as the "Battle of Breed's Hill. " On June 13, 1775, the leaders of the colonial forces besieging Boston learned that the British generals were planning to send troops out from the city to occupy the unoccupied hills surrounding the city.

In response to this intelligence, 1,200 colonial troops under the command of William Prescott stealthily occupied Bunker Hill and Breed's Hill, constructed an earthen redoubt on Breed's Hill, and built lightly fortified lines across most of the Charlestown Peninsula. When the British were alerted to the presence of the new position the next day, they mounted an attack against them. Geography Assault. Siege of Boston. After the April 19, 1775 Battles of Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, the 1,700 British soldiers returned to their quarters in Boston, then a town of approximately 15,500 people in addition to the British troops. The colonial Minute Men, numbering at least 14,000 to 16,000, were gathered four miles to the west in Cambridge.

The stage was thus set for the colonists’ Siege of Boston. Boston map, 1775 Boston map, 1775 & Today Geography is the key to understanding this American use of the military tactic of siege, i.e., militarily surrounding a town or other place with the intent of preventing free movement to or from the place or conquering by attrition rather than by attack. The town of Boston then was located on a peninsula surrounded on virtually all sides by the Charles River and the Boston Harbor and connected to the south mainland only by a narrow strip of land (“The Boston Neck”).

Siege of Boston map, 1775-1776 General George Washington Artillery for Boston, 1775. Boston "Neck" and subsequent landfall. Siege of Boston (map) Battles of Lexington and Concord, April 19, 1775. The Battles of Lexington and Concord were the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War.[9][10] They were fought on April 19, 1775, in Middlesex County, Province of Massachusetts Bay, within the towns of Lexington, Concord, Lincoln, Menotomy (present-day Arlington), and Cambridge, near Boston.

The battles marked the outbreak of open armed conflict between the Kingdom of Great Britain and its thirteen colonies in the mainland of British North America. Ralph Waldo Emerson, in his "Concord Hymn", described the first shot fired by the Patriots at the North Bridge as the "shot heard 'round the world. "[11] Background Government preparations Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith received orders from Gage on the afternoon of April 18 with instructions that he was not to read them until his troops were underway. American preparations The rebellion's ringleaders—with the exception of Paul Revere and Joseph Warren—had all left Boston by April 8.

Militia forces British advance. VID: Lexington, Concord & Bunker Hill. Last revised: March, 2014 Acceptance of Terms Please read this Terms of Service Agreement ("Terms of Service", "Terms of Use") carefully. These terms apply to Education Portal and its related websites owned and operated by Remilon, LLC ("Education Portal,", "Site", "Sites", "our", "us"). Education Portal provides the Services, which are defined below, to you subject to the following Terms of Service, which may be updated by us from time to time without notice to you.

BY ACCESSING, BROWSING OR USING THE SITE AND THE SERVICES PROVIDED THROUGH OR IN CONNECTION WITH EDUCATION PORTAL, YOU SIGNIFY AND ACKNOWLEDGE THAT YOU HAVE READ THE TERMS OF SERVICE AND AGREE THAT THE TERMS OF SERVICE CONSTITUTES A BINDING LEGAL AGREEMENT BETWEEN YOU AND EDUCATION PORTAL, AND THAT YOU AGREE TO BE BOUND BY AND COMPLY WITH THE TERMS OF SERVICE. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THE TERMS OF SERVICE, PLEASE DO NOT ACCESS THE SITES. Privacy Policy Terms Applicable to All Services User Accounts a. I. B. I. C. VID: 2nd Cont Cong & Common Sense. Last revised: March, 2014 Acceptance of Terms Please read this Terms of Service Agreement ("Terms of Service", "Terms of Use") carefully.

These terms apply to Education Portal and its related websites owned and operated by Remilon, LLC ("Education Portal,", "Site", "Sites", "our", "us"). Education Portal provides the Services, which are defined below, to you subject to the following Terms of Service, which may be updated by us from time to time without notice to you. YOU AGREE THAT BY USING THE SERVICE YOU REPRESENT THAT YOU ARE LEGALLY ABLE TO ENTER INTO THIS AGREEMENT AND YOU CERTIFY TO EDUCATION PORTAL THAT: (i) you are at least eighteen (18) years of age, or an emancipated minor, or possess legal parental or guardian consent. Privacy Policy Education Portal respects your privacy and permits you to control the treatment of your personal information. Terms Applicable to All Services We continually update the Education Portal service, including the course and content library. A. I. B. I. Second Continental Congress.

The Second Continental Congress was a convention of delegates from the Thirteen Colonies that started meeting in the summer of 1775, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, soon after warfare in the American Revolutionary War had begun. It succeeded the First Continental Congress, which met between September 5, 1774 and October 25, 1774, also in Philadelphia. The second Congress managed the colonial war effort, and moved incrementally towards independence, adopting the United States Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. By raising armies, directing strategy, appointing diplomats, and making formal treaties, the Congress acted as the de facto national government of what became the United States.[1] When the Second Continental Congress came together on May 10, 1775 it was, in effect, a reconvening of the First Continental Congress.

Delegates from twelve of the Thirteen Colonies were present when the Second Continental Congress convened. History[edit] Dates and places of sessions[edit] Seeking break from Britain. Olive Branch Petition. The Olive Branch Petition, Which was drafted on July 5th, 1775, was a major turning point in the progress of the American Revolution. The petition may also be referred to the “The Second Petition to the King” or “The Humble Petition” (Olive Branch Petition). The outcome and reactions to the Olive Branch Petition fueled and created new feelings and tensions between the American colonies and Great Britain. The significance of the Olive Branch petition can be broken down into the reasons for composing a petition of negotiation and the outcome due to English and Colonial reactions. The Olive Branch Petition is considered one of the most important and influential documents of the American Revolution (lively 226). The petition was the last chance the colonists gave the British for a peaceful negotiation (The Olive Branch Petition, 1775).

The true importance of the Olive Branch petition is defined due to the reactions that were devised. Bibliography Lively, Robert. “Olive Branch Petition”. George III's response (given to Parliament, Oct) July 2, 2010 KING GEORGE III’s ADDRESS TO PARLIAMENT 27 OCTOBER, 1775 Comments (0) No comments yet. VID: Bost Tea Pty to 1st Cont Cong (1773-74) Last revised: March, 2014 Acceptance of Terms Please read this Terms of Service Agreement ("Terms of Service", "Terms of Use") carefully. These terms apply to Education Portal and its related websites owned and operated by Remilon, LLC ("Education Portal,", "Site", "Sites", "our", "us"). Education Portal provides the Services, which are defined below, to you subject to the following Terms of Service, which may be updated by us from time to time without notice to you.

YOU AGREE THAT BY USING THE SERVICE YOU REPRESENT THAT YOU ARE LEGALLY ABLE TO ENTER INTO THIS AGREEMENT AND YOU CERTIFY TO EDUCATION PORTAL THAT: (i) you are at least eighteen (18) years of age, or an emancipated minor, or possess legal parental or guardian consent. Privacy Policy Education Portal respects your privacy and permits you to control the treatment of your personal information. Terms Applicable to All Services We continually update the Education Portal service, including the course and content library. A. I. B. I. VID: Intolerable Acts. Intolerable Acts (Br cartoon copied by Revere in BNA) Intolerable Acts. This Patriot cartoon depicting the Coercive Acts as the forcing of tea on an American woman (a symbol of the American colonies) was copied and distributed in the Thirteen Colonies.

The acts took away Massachusetts self-government and historic rights, triggering outrage and resistance in the Thirteen Colonies. They were key developments in the outbreak of the American Revolution in 1775. Background[edit] Relations between the Thirteen Colonies and the British Parliament slowly but steadily worsened after the end of the Seven Years' War (French and Indian War) in 1763. The war had plunged the British government deep into debt, and so the British Parliament enacted a series of measures to increase tax revenue from the colonies, including the closing of the Boston harbor, and the placement of 4,000 British troops into Boston. Many colonists, however, had developed a different conception of the British Empire. Passage[edit] Effects[edit] References[edit] Notes Bibliography Further reading. Massachusetts Provincial Congress (Oct 1774 to Oct 1780) The Massachusetts Provincial Congress (1774–1780) was a provisional government created in the Province of Massachusetts Bay early in the American Revolution.

Based roughly on the terms of the colonial charter, it exercised de facto control over the rebellious portions of the province, and after the British withdrawal from Boston in March 1776, the entire province. When Massachusetts declared its independence in 1776, the Congress continued to govern under this arrangement for several years. Increasing calls for constitutional change led to a failed proposal for a constitution produced by the congress in 1778, and then a successful constitutional convention that produced a constitution for the state in 1780.

The Provincial Congress came to an end with elections in October 1780. Termination of the provincial assembly[edit] On May 20, 1774, the Parliament of Great Britain passed the Massachusetts Government Act in an attempt to better assert its authority in the often troublesome colony. Suffolk Resolves (Sept 9, 1774)

First Continental Congress (Sept 5, 1774 to May 10, 1775) Freeman Vid 8 - The Logic of Resistance. Freeman Vid 9 - Who Were the Loyalists? Seeking break from Britain. Seeking reconciliation with Britain. Loyalists. 1774 Covenant. Freeman Vid 7 - Being a Revolutionary. Cttes of correspondence. Committees of Correspondence. Tea Act. Tarring & Feathering notice. Boston Tea Party (lithograph) Boston Tea Party. Colonial response to Tea Act and BTP. Liberty Tree - Revolutionary Symbolism.

How the Boston Tea Party Worked" The Tea Act. Hutchinson Letters engraving. Hutchinson Letters Affair. Pine Tree Riot. Gaspeé Incident. Gaspée Affair. Importance. Responses to the Gaspeé Affair. Freeman Vid 6 - Resistance or Rebellion? (Or, What the Heck is Happening in Boston?) Boston Massacre (1) Boston Massacre (2) VID (Stickmen): Boston Massacre. Boston Massacre Historical Society.