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Donjon; RPG Tools. Coffitivity - Increase Your Creativity! Quantum Diaries. 12 Letters That Didn’t Make the Alphabet. You know the alphabet. It’s one of the first things you’re taught in school. But did you know that they’re not teaching you all of the alphabet? There are quite a few letters we tossed aside as our language grew, and you probably never even knew they existed. 1. Thorn Have you ever seen a place that calls itself “ye olde whatever”?

Thorn, which was pronounced exactly like the "th" in its name, is actually still around today in Icelandic. 2. Another holdover from the Futhark runic alphabet, wynn was adapted to the Latin alphabet because it didn’t have a letter that quite fit the “w” sound that was common in English. Over time, though, the idea of sticking two u’s together actually became quite popular, enough so that they literally became stuck together and became the letter W (which, you’ll notice, is actually two V’s). 3.

Yogh stood for a sort of throaty noise that was common in Middle English words that sounded like the "ch" in "Bach" or Scottish "loch. " 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. The Ten Most Beautiful School Libraries In The World. Fairy Tales For 20-Somethings Tumblr Reveals The Truth About Growing Up. Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, Rumpelstiltskin, Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood.

Fairy Tales For 20-Somethings Tumblr Reveals The Truth About Growing Up

Most children grow up reading (and watching the Disney versions) of these fairy tales. And somehow, even years after, they still manage to hold a special place in our collective imaginations -- just look at the number of fairy tale-themed movies and TV shows for adults that have cropped up over the past few years ("Snow White and the Huntsman," "Grimm," "Once Upon A Time" and "Mirror, Mirror," just to name a few). Now Tim Manley, a 27-year-old New York City high school teacher, has reimagined many of these classic stories ... in the voice of a 20-something, Millennial urbanite.

The results, published on his Tumblr, "Fairy Tales For 20-Somethings," satirize the mindset of that demographic pretty brilliantly. Snow White dreams of Ryan Gosling, Rumpelstiltskin starts thinking about his reproductive urges, the tortoise meets the hare for a caffeine break, and Chicken Little discovers hot yoga. The Brain. Project Details The Brain is a 14,280 cubic-foot cinematic laboratory where the client, a filmmaker, can work out ideas.

The Brain

Physically, that neighborhood birthplace of invention, the garage, provides the conceptual model. The form is essentially a cast-in-place concrete box, intended to be a strong yet neutral background that provides complete flexibility to adapt the space at will. Inserted into the box along the north wall is a steel mezzanine. All interior structures are made using raw, hot-rolled steel sheets. Five hundred new fairytales discovered in Germany. A whole new world of magic animals, brave young princes and evil witches has come to light with the discovery of 500 new fairytales, which were locked away in an archive in Regensburg, Germany for over 150 years.

Five hundred new fairytales discovered in Germany

The tales are part of a collection of myths, legends and fairytales, gathered by the local historian Franz Xaver von Schönwerth (1810–1886) in the Bavarian region of Oberpfalz at about the same time as the Grimm brothers were collecting the fairytales that have since charmed adults and children around the world.

Last year, the Oberpfalz cultural curator Erika Eichenseer published a selection of fairytales from Von Schönwerth's collection, calling the book Prinz Roßzwifl. This is local dialect for "scarab beetle". The scarab, also known as the "dung beetle", buries its most valuable possession, its eggs, in dung, which it then rolls into a ball using its back legs. Eichenseer says the fairytales are not for children alone. The SCP Foundation.



Terry Jones' Medieval Lives. How much do you think you know about the Middle Ages? Terry Jones' mission is to rescue this romanticised era from cliches and well-worn platitudes. Revealing that no one thought the world was flat and dental hygiene was actually better than it is today, Jones will use animation, medieval locations across Europe and new research to bring the Middle Ages to life. The truth behind eight familiar medieval archetypes including the Knight, the Damsel and the King is unravelled, exposing some wonderfully human stories. How much do you think you know about the Middle Ages? Terry Jones' mission is to rescue this romanticised era from cliches and well-worn platitudes. The story of the Merlion.