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Stephen Hawking: 'Transcendence looks at the implications of artificial intelligence - but are we taking AI seriously enough?' - Science - News. Artificial-intelligence (AI) research is now progressing rapidly.

Stephen Hawking: 'Transcendence looks at the implications of artificial intelligence - but are we taking AI seriously enough?' - Science - News

Recent landmarks such as self-driving cars, a computer winning at Jeopardy! And the digital personal assistants Siri, Google Now and Cortana are merely symptoms of an IT arms race fuelled by unprecedented investments and building on an increasingly mature theoretical foundation. Such achievements will probably pale against what the coming decades will bring.

The potential benefits are huge; everything that civilisation has to offer is a product of human intelligence; we cannot predict what we might achieve when this intelligence is magnified by the tools that AI may provide, but the eradication of war, disease, and poverty would be high on anyone's list. Success in creating AI would be the biggest event in human history. Blind Sight: The Next Generation of Sensory Substitution Technology - The Crux. It’s long been known that blind people are able to compensate for their loss of sight by using other senses, relying on sound and touch to help them “see” the world.

Blind Sight: The Next Generation of Sensory Substitution Technology - The Crux

Neuroimaging studies have backed this up, showing that in blind people brain regions devoted to sight become rewired to process touch and sound as visual information. Now, in the age of Google Glass, smartphones and self-driving cars, new technology offers ever more advanced ways of substituting one sensory experience for another. These exciting new devices can restore sight to the blind in ways never before thought possible. The Quantified Other: Nest And Fitbit Chase A Lucrative Side Business. Le futur : six logiciels pour changer le monde (suite) The Battle For The Connected Home Is Heating Up. Editor’s note: Matt Turck is a managing director of FirstMark Capital.

The Battle For The Connected Home Is Heating Up

Follow him on Twitter at @mattturck. Almost 15 years ago, a friend of mine at McKinsey spent a few nights writing a document called “The Battle for the Home”. Full Steam Ahead: Inside Valve's Grand Plan to Replace Game Consoles With PCs. Clockwise from left: Anna Sweet, Eric Hope and Greg Coomer, three of the Valve employees at work on the company’s Steam Machines initiative, in the Valve offices in Bellevue, Washington.

Full Steam Ahead: Inside Valve's Grand Plan to Replace Game Consoles With PCs

Photo: Matthew Ryan Williams/WIRED BELLEVUE, WA — Installed base. It’s what every gaming machine needs if it’s to get even a tenuous foothold in this ultra-competitive market. Software developers won’t bring their killer games to your platform if there isn’t a critical mass of addressable customers — but those customers won’t buy your hardware in the first place without exclusive software.

The Gigaom guide to deep learning: Who’s doing it, and why it matters. The field of deep learning is picking up steam to the point that it’s now inspiring a growing list of startups in areas such as natural language processing and image recognition.

The Gigaom guide to deep learning: Who’s doing it, and why it matters

It’s also commanding a growing percentage of research and acquisition budgets at companies such as Google, Microsoft, Facebook and Yahoo. This post highlights some of the companies involved in this space and the type of products or projects they’re working on. What deep learning is First, though, a little primer: Despite its cognitive moniker, deep learning isn’t really about teaching machines to mimic the human brain a la the BRAIN Initiative President Obama announced in 2012.

The Threat of Artificial Intelligence. If the New York Times’s latest article is to be believed, artificial intelligence is moving so fast it sometimes seems almost “magical.”

The Threat of Artificial Intelligence

Self-driving cars have arrived; Siri can listen to your voice and find the nearest movie theatre; and I.B.M. just set the “Jeopardy”-conquering Watson to work on medicine, initially training medical students, perhaps eventually helping in diagnosis. Scarcely a month goes by without the announcement of a new A.I. product or technique. Yet, some of the enthusiasm may be premature: as I’ve noted previously, we still haven’t produced machines with common sense, vision, natural language processing, or the ability to create other machines. Our efforts at directly simulating human brains remain primitive. Moore's Law Is Dead, What Comes Next? The world’s most powerful computing machine is perhaps also the most ubiquitous: the human brain.

Moore's Law Is Dead, What Comes Next?

World's Fastest Computer Will Operate Like a Human Brain. A large group of scientists and researchers is working to develop the fastest computer known to man that would operate much like the human brain.

World's Fastest Computer Will Operate Like a Human Brain

The Human Brain Project, which launched Monday at a conference in Switzerland, combines the brainpower of 135 science institutions and government entities to create the computer brain. Google in Jeopardy: What If IBM's Watson Dethroned the King of Search? Photo: Sam Gustin / WIRED Remember Watson, IBM’s Jeopardy champion?

Google in Jeopardy: What If IBM's Watson Dethroned the King of Search?

A couple years ago, Watson beat the top two human champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter at a game where even interpreting the cue is complex with language nuances. (Not to mention finding answers at lightning speed on any subject matter.) Yet after the initial excitement, most people – except for a notable few – forgot about Watson. But we need to pay attention, and now. Watson was arguably the first computer ever to pass the Turing Test, designed by British mathematician Alan Turing to determine whether a computer could think. Nanotechnology advance in making 'programmable matter' using nanocrystals.

Cost-saving computer chips get smaller than ever with nanotechnology. The Man Who Would Build a Computer the Size of the Entire Internet. Solomon Hykes, the driving force behind Docker, an open source project that seeks to recast the internet as one giant computer.

The Man Who Would Build a Computer the Size of the Entire Internet

Photo: Alex Washburn/WIRED Google runs its web empire on computers the size of warehouses. Inside the massive data centers that drive things like Google Search and Gmail and Google Maps, you’ll find tens of thousands of machines — each small enough to hold in your arms — but thanks to a new breed of software that spans this sea of servers, the entire data center operates like a single system, one giant computer that runs any application the company throws at it.

A Google application like Gmail doesn’t run on a particular server or even a select group of servers. The real plan for Google Glass may be to sell it to businesses, not consumers - Quartz. Yesterday evening in New York City, Google’s Glass team threw a party. The Rise of Minimalist Sex Apps. In January of last year, Roman Sidorenko and Alexander Kukhtenko had an idea to break their sexual dry spells the way they solved many of their other problems: with an app. "We wanted an easy way to find sex, basically," says Sidorenko. But the two friends (who describe themselves as "pomosexuals") were too impatient to use the available dating apps on the market, all of which required them to spend hours flirting with potential flings via chat or text message before getting a date and, possibly, sealing the deal.

Technological singularity. The technological singularity is the hypothesis that accelerating progress in technologies will cause a runaway effect wherein artificial intelligence will exceed human intellectual capacity and control, thus radically changing civilization in an event called the singularity.[1] Because the capabilities of such an intelligence may be impossible for a human to comprehend, the technological singularity is an occurrence beyond which events may become unpredictable, unfavorable, or even unfathomable.[2] The first use of the term "singularity" in this context was by mathematician John von Neumann.

Proponents of the singularity typically postulate an "intelligence explosion",[5][6] where superintelligences design successive generations of increasingly powerful minds, that might occur very quickly and might not stop until the agent's cognitive abilities greatly surpass that of any human. Basic concepts Superintelligence Non-AI singularity. Bio-Hackers, Get Ready. When I speak to technical founders, they often look back with fondness to days of tinkering with a Commodore 64 or Hypercard.

But perhaps tomorrow’s founders will experiment with a very different kind of code — the genetic code that underlies how everything from one-celled organisms to humans develop and behave. Making Sense Of The Internet Of Things. Editor’s note: Matt Turck is a managing director of FirstMark Capital. Follow him on Twitter @mattturck. The emerging Internet of Things — essentially, the world of physical devices connected to the network/Internet, from your Fitbit or Nest to industrial machines — is experiencing a burst of activity and creativity that is getting entrepreneurs, VCs and the press equally excited.

The space looks like a boisterous hodgepodge of smart hobbyists, new startups and large corporations that are eager to be a part of what could be a huge market, and all sorts of enabling products and technologies, some of which, including crowdfunding and 3D printing, are themselves far from established. Augmented Reality: Fujitsu touch and gesture video interface. MIT Media Lab Futuristic Projects. SXSW Keynote Speaker Olivier Bau Talks About Creating Invisible Objects Using Electricity. Oculus Rift at SXSW: is virtual reality the 'Holy Grail' of gaming? Cognitive enhancement: How the Internet is expanding our minds. Photo by Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images.

How Mind-Controlled Games Work - And Why It's Way, Way Bigger Than That. Soon You Will Interact With Computers Through Thought Alone. Holograms, ‘Minority Report’ Gestures And Other Ways Your Meetings Will Change By 2018. Editor’s note: Jeff Cavins is the CEO of visual collaboration company FuzeBox. Follow him on Twitter @cavwave. You Can Reach Into This Monitor And Touch The Interface. Gesture controls, like Leap Motion, could bring a slew of new control paradigms to desktop computing.