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Psykologia

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Your eyes are lying to you. These strawberries are not red. Akiyoshi Kitaoka is a Professor of Psychology at the College of Letters, Ritsumeikan University, in Kyoto, Japan.

Your eyes are lying to you. These strawberries are not red

As we've established before, he's behind a majority of the most devious optical illusions on the internet. He's come up with another one, which he recently tweeted: There are no red pixels in the image. We checked it out, he's right, obviously. Picture: @AkiyoshiKitaoka/Twitter/Screengrab It's definitely a neutral grey.

So how is the illusion done? Colour constancy - your brain is attempting to colour correct the world in different light - it expects to see red strawberries, so tries to. Bevil Conway, an expert from the National Eye Institute, told Vice: If you imagine walking around outside under a blue sky, that blueness is, in some sense, colour-contaminating everything you see. This optical illusion will break your brain. This one's absolutely diabolical.

This optical illusion will break your brain

Neuroscientists create ‘atlas’ showing how words are organised in the brain. Scientists have created an “atlas of the brain” that reveals how the meanings of words are arranged across different regions of the organ.

Neuroscientists create ‘atlas’ showing how words are organised in the brain

Like a colourful quilt laid over the cortex, the atlas displays in rainbow hues how individual words and the concepts they convey can be grouped together in clumps of white matter. “Our goal was to build a giant atlas that shows how one specific aspect of language is represented in the brain, in this case semantics, or the meanings of words,” said Jack Gallant, a neuroscientist at the University of California, Berkeley. No single brain region holds one word or concept. Scientists have found another new way to trick your brain. Researchers at Bielefeld University in Germany have found a new way to outwit our perception, the cunning so-and-so’s.

Scientists have found another new way to trick your brain

The scientists at the Cluster of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology, placed test subject’s fingers in an apparatus upon the surface of an elastic fabric strap. Picture: CITEC/BIELEFELD UNIVERSITY While touching the object, the strap would tighten or loosen at random, although the position of the subjects’ finger would barely change. The volunteers were asked to say whether they thought their finger had bent, and all were confused as to the reality of what had happened, as explained by Dr Alessandro Moscatelli: Astonishingly, all study participants estimated their finger to be most bent when the elastic band was loose. Essentially, the fact that our fingers are fleshy and can give way to a surface can betray our brains as to whether we're touching something hard or soft, as well as to whether our finger has moved.

The reading test that shows you what it's like to be dyslexic. Daniel Britton is a graphic designer who was diagnosed with full dyslexia in his last year as a student at the London School of Communications.

The reading test that shows you what it's like to be dyslexic

In response to the diagnosis and in an attempt to recreate the emotional experience of dyslexia, he created a font. See if you can read it: Picture: Daniel Britton It took you a while, right? There's only one type of brain that isn't fooled by this optical illusion. Optical illusions are fascinating because of their ability to suspend reality tricking people into seeing a false image.

There's only one type of brain that isn't fooled by this optical illusion

And research indicates that one particular illusion fails to fool those who suffer from schizophrenia. The hollow mask is an illusion in which viewers perceive a concave, rather than convex face. The average brain perceives the world using a combination of bottom-up (what it sees) and top-down processing (the expectation based on experience), Wired reports. Danai Dima, Hannover Medical University and Jonathan Roiser of UCL put 16 healthy subjects and 13 schizophrenia patients through an fMRI machine, and measured their brain activity when they were presented with the image. Danai said: There's only one type of brain that isn't fooled by this optical illusion. Presidential optical illusion offers clues to how brain processes faces.

An optical illusion that appears after looking at pictures of Bill Clinton and George Bush offers important clues to how the brain and eyes see faces.

Presidential optical illusion offers clues to how brain processes faces

The illusion is conjured by first concentrating for a short while on the red dot between the two men’s faces. This optical illusion will make a hole appear in your hand. Breaking news: You probably have two eyes.

This optical illusion will make a hole appear in your hand

Ok, that's not news, and frankly, this isn't a breaking story either, but it is a neat trick you may want to try if you've got a piece of paper to hand. Roll it up into a tube and look through it with one eye, as if a telescope, while placing your hand over your other eye, a couple of inches from your face.

If you look through the tube primarily, it will begin to look like there is a hole in your hand. This is due to a thing called binocular rivalry - ie. your eyes competing for dominance in focus. Watch the full explainer by Vanessa Hill, below: HT Metro More: Seven still images that look like they're moving - and how they work. This is how optical illusions work. We know the mind can be tricked by an optical illusion, but most people don't know why that happens.

This is how optical illusions work

This video from Inside Science explains just what goes on inside the brain when, for example, a person looks at the dress. In essence, what you see isn't what you get because the brain takes shortcuts to process information. "When you look at something, what you’re really seeing is the light that bounced off of it and entered your eye, which converts the light into electrical impulses that your brain can turn into an image you can use," the video explains. Genetic switch left in 'on' position identified by scientists as likely cause of autism in children - Science - News - The Independent.

It is the first time that researchers have been able to identify a precise mutation that appears to lead to autism, which is known to have a strong inherited component as well as being influenced by non-genetic factors.

Genetic switch left in 'on' position identified by scientists as likely cause of autism in children - Science - News - The Independent

There are an estimated 700,000 people in Britain with some kind of autistic disorder, which is more than 1 in 100 people in the general population. Improve Your Decisions - Free Courses On Reasoning and Decision Making.