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A Short History of Nearly Everything Summary - Bill Bryson. In case the title itself isn’t a giveaway, “A Short History of Nearly Everything” is a book about “how we went from there being nothing at all to there being something, and then how a little of that something turned into us, and also what happened in between and since.”

A Short History of Nearly Everything Summary - Bill Bryson

That’s a lot of ground to cover, so get ready for the intellectual odyssey of a lifetime! Lost in the cosmos There are more protons in the dot of an “i” than there are seconds in half a million years. That’s how infinitesimal protons are. Amanda Gorman Captures the Moment in “The Hill We Climb” Mr.

Amanda Gorman Captures the Moment in “The Hill We Climb”

President, Dr. Biden, Madam Vice President, Mr. Under-Earth comic set in subterranean Melbourne imagines post-capitalist dystopian Australia - ABC News. In July 2016, while waiting for a flight home at LAX airport, Chris Gooch started devising Delforge — part exile colony, part subterranean garbage dump, in near-future Melbourne.

Under-Earth comic set in subterranean Melbourne imagines post-capitalist dystopian Australia - ABC News

It's a place where shoplifters and murderers journey deep below the earth's surface to toil in caves oozing with toxic bin juice, scavenging waste for money; street merchants peddle barely-charged vintage iPods and Nintendo 64 gaming consoles. This fictional dystopia is at the centre of Gooch's second graphic novel, Under-Earth: a three-part prison heist thriller, which he describes as following "two stories of people struggling just to do the best they can and have the life and friendships that they can in a circumstance where every decision they make — good and bad — is morally compromised". Publications - Yuval Noah Harari. Books (UK editions) Yuval Noah Harari, David Vandermeulen, Daniel Casanave, Sapiens: A Graphic History, Volume 1 – The Birth of Humankind (Jonathan Cape, 2020)Yuval Noah Harari, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century (Jonathan Cape, 2018).Yuval Noah Harari, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow (Harvill Secker, 2016).Yuval Noah Harari, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind (Harvill Secker, 2014).Yuval Noah Harari, The Ultimate Experience: Battlefield Revelations and the Making of Modern War Culture, 1450-2000 (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2008).Yuval Noah Harari, Special Operations in the Age of Chivalry, 1100-1550 (Boydell & Brewer, 2007).Yuval Noah Harari, Renaissance Military Memoirs: War, History and Identity, 1450-1600 (Boydell & Brewer, 2004).

Publications - Yuval Noah Harari

Academic Essays. THE GROT. OpenStax. The real Lord of the Flies: what happened when six boys were shipwrecked for 15 months. For centuries western culture has been permeated by the idea that humans are selfish creatures.

The real Lord of the Flies: what happened when six boys were shipwrecked for 15 months

That cynical image of humanity has been proclaimed in films and novels, history books and scientific research. But in the last 20 years, something extraordinary has happened. Scientists from all over the world have switched to a more hopeful view of mankind. This development is still so young that researchers in different fields often don’t even know about each other. When I started writing a book about this more hopeful view, I knew there was one story I would have to address.

On the very first day, the boys institute a democracy of sorts. By the time a British naval officer comes ashore, the island is a smouldering wasteland. This story never happened. I first read Lord of the Flies as a teenager. I began to wonder: had anyone ever studied what real children would do if they found themselves alone on a deserted island?

The article did not provide any sources. I was bursting with questions. The Archipelago of Hope: Wisdom and Resilience from the Edge of Climate Change by Gleb Raygorodetsky. What Can I Do to Help Heal the Environmental Crisis? - Haydn Washington. Bibliomania: the strange history of compulsive book buying. When I was a young woman, I drew a sort of perverse pride from my willingness to skip a meal or two in order to afford books.

Bibliomania: the strange history of compulsive book buying

Soon enough, with the ubiquity of credit card touts on campus, I could buy both books and meals. I justified my increasing debt as necessary for my education, and joked with friends that while others spent their money on cars and expensive clothes, anything of value that I owned was on my bookcases. I realise now that my “jokes” were, in fact, humblebrags. I did love books, always had, but I also took a certain arrogant pleasure from owning so many. It was also when my first “To Be Read” (TBR) pile started – all those volumes I had bought with the intention of reading them. Paulo Coelho — Paulo Coelho Writer Official Site. 12 travel books you won’t be able to put down this summer. Cheap textbooks – StudentVIP Textbooks. 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die - Wikipedia.

The list[edit] The list contains 1001 titles and is made up of novels, short stories, and short story collections.

1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die - Wikipedia

There is also one pamphlet (A Modest Proposal), one book of collected text (Adjunct: An Undigest), and one graphic novel (Watchmen). The most featured authors on the list are J. M. Coetzee and Charles Dickens with ten titles each.[3] Catalog your books online. Books, Online Books, #1 Australian online bookstore, Buy Discount Books, eBooks and DVDs from Australia and the world. Word Count in Tolkien's Books - LotrProject.

Forgotten Books. Desiderata. 1920s prose poem by Max Ehrman 1976 edition of The Desiderata of Happiness poetry collection "Desiderata" (Latin: "things desired") is an early 1920s prose poem by the American writer Max Ehrmann.

Desiderata

Although he copyrighted it in 1927, he distributed copies of it without a required copyright notice during 1933 and c. 1942, thereby forfeiting his US copyright.[1] Largely unknown in the author's lifetime, its use in devotional and spoken word recordings in 1960 and 1971 called it to the attention of the world.[2] History[edit] The ALL NEW Don't Think of an Elephant! OTHER BOOKS - YOUR BRAIN ON NATURE. Avicenna. Avicenna (/ˌævəˈsɛnə/; also Ibn Sīnā or Abu Ali Sina; Persian: ابن سینا‎; c. 980 – June 1037) was a Persian polymath who is regarded as one of the most significant physicians, astronomers, thinkers and writers of the Islamic Golden Age.[5] He has been described as the father of early modern medicine.[6][7][8] Of the 450 works he is known to have written, around 240 have survived, including 150 on philosophy and 40 on medicine.[9] His most famous works are The Book of Healing, a philosophical and scientific encyclopedia, and The Canon of Medicine, a medical encyclopedia[10][11][12] which became a standard medical text at many medieval universities[13] and remained in use as late as 1650.[14] In 1973, Avicenna's Canon Of Medicine was reprinted in New York.[15] Besides philosophy and medicine, Avicenna's corpus includes writings on astronomy, alchemy, geography and geology, psychology, Islamic theology, logic, mathematics, physics, and works of poetry.[16] Name[edit] Circumstances[edit] [edit]

Avicenna

20 Quotes From Children’s Books Every Adult Should Know. Posted on July 7, 2014 It’s interesting how some of life’s greatest lessons can be found in children’s literature.

20 Quotes From Children’s Books Every Adult Should Know

And chances are that we did not realize this back when we were kids. Sometimes it’s only when we’re older that we learn to fully appreciate and understand the poignant words from our childhood entertainment. Here’s some of the best quotes from books we used to read. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Misbehaving Children in Ancient Times. Dear Quote Investigator: There is a great quote by Plato or Socrates about the misbehavior of children in antiquity that I read in the New York Times. The quote shows that the problems between generations are not just a recent occurrence.

Instead, the conflicts between parents and offspring are timeless [NY8]: The children now love luxury. Douglas Adams Quotes (Author of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) Dialogue - Is the Marcus Aurelius quote in Black Sails a rewrite? - Movies & TV Stack Exchange. This is perhaps not the best place for this Q, but I'm not able to find any site more suitable. (Have looked at English Language and Usage, Writers and the like, but doesn't seem to fit.)

Towards the end of Black Sails third episode we are given a read by Miranda from Marcus Aurelius Meditations. With the possibility of not recapturing it correctly it goes something like: – The emperor writes: How should you be? You should be like a rocky promontory against which the restless surf continuously pounds. Is this from an existing translation / rewrite, or is it a rework by the authors of the TV-series? Translation (1862) by George Long (1800 – 1879) can be found here, which at end of book four has: […] Be like the promontory against which the waves continually break, but it stands firm and tames the fury of the water around it. […]