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Climate action is the key to Australia achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Australia will join the 71st United Nations General Assembly in New York this week.

Climate action is the key to Australia achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

National Landcare Programme. 20 million trees will be planted by 2020 to deliver real environmental benefits at the local level.

National Landcare Programme

Progress to date Under the 20 Million Trees Programme $42.655million (GST exclusive) has been announced across 164 projects to plant more than 13.4 million trees (as at 25 July 2016). In order to maximise the survival rates of native trees and vegetation to be delivered under the Programme, the Programme ensures adequate preparatory activities, such as weed removal and seed collecting, are undertaken before plantings take place, and that plantings occur at the right time of year. For example, Tranche 1 service provider projects were funded in May 2015, which allows for seed collecting and site preparation activities that will maximise survival of plants which will largely be planted from autumn and winter 2016.

Tranche 2 service provider projects were contracted in early 2016. What is the 20 Million Trees Programme? How can I get involved? Competitive Grants Service Provider Contact us. Urban Heat Climate Change Impact Snapshot. SubPlan HeatWave 20111101. Heatwaves Climate Change Impact Snapshot. People most at risk - Beat the Heat. ​Everyone needs to take care in hot weather but some people are at higher risk of heat illness, especially if they live alone or are socially isolated.

People most at risk - Beat the Heat

The following people are most at risk: People who are:​ over the age of 75infants and young childrenoverweight or obesepregnant or breastfeedingnot very mobilenot drinking enough waterliving by themselves or homelesssocially isolatedworking in a hot environment (for example labourers, gardeners, fire fighters)exercising vigorously in the heatPeople who have a chronic illness, for example*:​ heart diseasehigh blood pressurediabetescancer or kidney diseasemental illnessdementiaalcohol and other drug use​People who have an acute illness such as:​ an infection with a fevergastroenteritis (diarrhoea and/or vomiting)​People who take certain medications (please see a note on prescription medications). * These are only examples; there are many more conditions that may be affected in hot weather. Plan Melbourne refresh at a glance WEB FA R2. Australia rates rather poorly on UN Sustainable Development Goals « Antinuclear.

Australia ranks 20th on progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals, The Conversation, John Thwaites July 21, 2016 Australia may be home to some of the world’s most liveable cities, but we have a long way to go to meet the world’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Australia rates rather poorly on UN Sustainable Development Goals « Antinuclear

Australia ranks 20th in the world – well behind Canada and many European countries but ahead of the United States – according to a new index that compares different nations’ performance on the SDGs, which were adopted last September. Launched at this week’s United Nations SDG talks in New York, the index marks each country’s performance towards the 17 goals. These aim to put the world on a more sustainable economic, social and environmental path, and feature 169 targets to be met over the next 15 years in areas such as health, economic growth and climate action. Australia: good water, bad energy Like this: Like Loading... No comments yet. Australia can do much better than a rank of 20 on sustainable development goals. Measuring progress against the Sustainable Development Goals and implications for Australia - IOD PARC Australasia.

In September 2015 UN member states committed to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – with 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets.

Measuring progress against the Sustainable Development Goals and implications for Australia - IOD PARC Australasia

The 17 SDGs aim to build on what was achieved under the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 2000-2015. They aim to eradicate extreme poverty and ensure sustainable (economic, social and environmental) development. This agenda is incredibly ambitious. Where the MDGs focused on improving the livelihoods of the poorest and most vulnerable in developing countries, the SDGs apply to all member states. Developing countries will continue efforts to improve outcomes in areas such as extreme poverty, health and education. The estimated financial cost required to achieve all SDG targets by participating countries varies considerably. Reaching agreement on global development targets is a remarkable achievement in itself. Sustainable Development Goals. Global goals to combat poverty, inequality and climate change We’ll be in touch soon with next steps you can take.

Sustainable Development Goals

Tell your friends you’re playing your part in building a fairer future for all! In September 2015, world leaders will gather at the United Nations in New York to pledge their support for a new set of global goals to combat poverty and protect the planet. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are 17 new global goals that chart a pathway from 2015 to 2030 for every nation to: Address poverty, hunger and malnutritionTackle inequality and build more inclusive, peaceful societies and economies for allCombat climate change and protect the planetAddress gender inequality and stop all forms of violence against women and girls The goals come after global talks between governments, organisations, businesses and people like you to agree the key challenges that need to be addressed for a better world by 2030. Take Action Learn More Share. Tackling climate change and promoting sustainable development final.

Australia ranks 20th on progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Australia may be home to some of the world’s most liveable cities, but we have a long way to go to meet the world’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Australia ranks 20th on progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals

Australia ranks 20th in the world – well behind Canada and many European countries but ahead of the United States – according to a new index that compares different nations' performance on the SDGs, which were adopted last September. Launched at this week’s United Nations SDG talks in New York, the index marks each country’s performance towards the 17 goals.