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A Stanford researcher's 15-minute study hack improves test grades by a third of a grade — Quartz. Policy makers, tech executives, teachers, and parents are forever trying to find new ways to improve kids’ performance at school.

A Stanford researcher's 15-minute study hack improves test grades by a third of a grade — Quartz

Schools design and redesign curricula, teachers embrace and reject new learning technologies, and parents plot ways to get their kids to study more. One novel solution researchers find helps kids to perform better is to get them to think about how they think—metacognition—and have them strategize how they study. If this sounds easy, it is not. “All too often, students just jump mindlessly into studying before they have even strategized what to use, without understanding why they are using each resource, and without planning out how they would use the resource to learn effectively,” says Patricia Chen, a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford with a PhD. Open Space Technology: Decision by Inclusion. The first time I heard of Open Space Technology was in 2013 at the initial meeting of the Teacher Resistance and Action Network, a group of teachers and education practitioners who had gathered under the guidance of Dr.

Open Space Technology: Decision by Inclusion

Thomas Poetter of Miami University to discuss how to teach responsibly in the age of high-stakes testing. My friend and mentor, Kevin Lydy, had invited me to attend what was billed as a non-conference. It was a life-changing experience, not only because of the great conversations that I had with fellow educators, but also because I learned about a technique that I'd never heard of before: Open Space Technology. Some Edutopia readers may be familiar with Edcamps, which are, in fact, based on (and utilize) OST. Why Minecraft is the newest and coolest teaching tool in school. Have you ever heard of Minecraft?

Why Minecraft is the newest and coolest teaching tool in school.

If you haven't, don't worry — I had no clue what it was either until my 14-year-old brother showed it to me. It's a game that has become really popular in the past few years, and it looks kind of like Legos coming to life combined with The Sims. GIF via Daily Motion. In the game, you can build worlds, craft shelters, create tools, and go on missions. It's kind of old school but in a refreshing way. Minecraft might seem like just a sweet video game.

Remember when "educational games" involved watching your pixelated family and livestock perish repeatedly on the Oregon Trail? The Stanford professor who pioneered praising kids for effort says we’ve totally missed the point. On a bitingly cold winter’s day in 2013, a woman whom I’ll call Laurie took me to the terrace of a tall building in a city about two hours west of London, England.

The Stanford professor who pioneered praising kids for effort says we’ve totally missed the point

Years earlier, she’d tried to jump from the terrace and kill herself. It had been a harrowing time for Laurie. She’d started hearing voices in her head and often felt as if an outside force was controlling her. She attributed her suicide attempt to this outside force. “I wasn’t the one making that decision,” she told me. Fortunately, she never did jump. We tend to think of schizophrenia as a disorder of the mind. In Laurie’s case, she remembers feeling dissociated from her body when her symptoms were at their most intense. “If I [would] extend my hand out, I’d think my hand was going to go off somewhere else, further away,” she said. Understanding the bodily self What Laurie was experiencing was a disruption of her bodily self as well as her psychological one. But these are not static representations. Foreign limbs. ‘In 22 years, I have never seen anything quite like it’ A small group of 24 students is gathered in the library at George Green’s School on the Isle of Dogs.

‘In 22 years, I have never seen anything quite like it’

After a period of fiddling with hair, averted gazes, rustling and whispering, their attention is caught by the tiny, tousle-haired American woman in the centre of the room. Her energy is dynamic and pervasive, and she is asking them to provide her with a definition of feeling. Legit: Tennessee high school senior decimates Common Core. Leadership Comes From The Heart - Leadership 360. The call to lead requires those who are willing to sail into uncharted waters.

Leadership Comes From The Heart - Leadership 360

This particular moment calls for exquisite leaders, those who know the depth and breadth of the need, who have been gifted (or cursed) with a vision of what might be and who are inspired enough for others to follow by choice. As a nation, Americans are a hopeful people. It comes from our roots and explains why immigrants still come here. We are the land of opportunity. Our schools are critically linked to this national identity. The Science of Passion Based Learning. “You can’t separate intellect and feelings in the work of the mind.

The Science of Passion Based Learning

They’re both there all the time. Real learning—attentive real learning, deep learning—is playful and frustrating and joyful and discouraging and exciting and sociable and private all at the same time, which is what makes it great.” ~ Eleanor Duckworth Know when to memorize. Know when to mesmerize! If we want students to learn deeply and efficiently we need to understand the role emotions play in different types of learning. Without getting into it too deeply, we could probably agree that we want students to acquire some knowledge, skills and attitudes.