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101 Sci-Fi Adventures. Image from John Hilgart’s 4CP archive Recently, I compiled a list of two hundred of my favorite adventures published before the Eighties (1984–93).

101 Sci-Fi Adventures

Forty-three of the titles on that list are science fiction adventures. 10 Science Fiction Novels You Pretend to Have Read (And Why You Should Actually Read Them) Science fiction future technologies. Jules Verne. Jules Gabriel Verne (/vɜrn/;[1] French: [ʒyl vɛʁn]; 8 February 1828 – 24 March 1905) was a French novelist, poet, and playwright best known for his adventure novels and his profound influence on the literary genre of science fiction.

Jules Verne

Verne was born to bourgeois parents in the seaport of Nantes, where he was trained to follow in his father's footsteps as a lawyer, but quit the profession early in life to write for magazines and the stage. His collaboration with the publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel led to the creation of the Voyages Extraordinaires, a widely popular series of scrupulously researched adventure novels including Journey to the Center of the Earth, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and Around the World in Eighty Days.

Het Jules Verne Genootschap. H. G. Wells. Herbert George "H.

H. G. Wells

G. " Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946)[3] was an English writer, now best known for his work in the science fiction genre. He was also a prolific writer in many other genres, including contemporary novels, history, politics and social commentary, even writing textbooks and rules for war games. Wells is sometimes called "The Father of Science Fiction", as are Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback.[4][a] His most notable science fiction works include The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, The Invisible Man and The Island of Doctor Moreau. Wells's earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context.[5] He was also from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as at the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views.

Science Fiction Future.