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Six Engaging End-of-Year Projects. I don't know about your students, but so many of mine, coupled with Senioritis, were done after state testing. (The well had run dry, no blood from a turnip -- all those sayings applied!) With just a few precious weeks left in the school year, what do you do to keep the kids energized and on board with learning? One thing I knew for sure when it came to my high school students: They had to feel as if they weren't actually doing work.

(Yep, I had to trick them.) And whatever you do plan, especially for secondary students, three elements are essential: choices, creativity, and constructing. In other words, as long as you present options and then have them create something that includes using their imaginations, you really can't go wrong. Consider these projects (and I've included the cognitive demands): 1. Give students an opportunity to teach the rest of the class something, like origami, a new app, or a martial arts self-defense move (design, construct, apply). 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Integrated PBL Projects: A Full-Course Meal! In the project-based learning field, we use the metaphor that projects are the "main course, not the dessert" (as coined in an article from the Buck Institute for Education). Projects are intended to create the need-to-know content and skills, and the opportunity for students to learn them in an authentic context. When teachers first design PBL projects, they are often limited.

In fact, I recommend that. Teachers and students must learn to become better PBL practitioners, so limited projects can lead to more ambitious projects. One of the criteria for a more ambitious project is to integrate the disciplines. This can be easy or challenging depending on your context, grade level, and schedule structures. Teachers develop PBL curriculum for the coming year.

Photo Credit: Andrew Miller Use a Variety of Planning Strategies I wrote about many of these strategies in a previous blog post. Larger Part of the Meal Not all integrated projects are equal when it comes to the disciplines. Structuring Collaboration for Student Success (Keys to PBL Series Part 3) Peggy: The teacher doesn’t just throw control to the students and say, "Let me know what you figure out.

" She really has to plan ahead of time, she has to figure out how to group the students so that they're the most productive. She has to scaffold their work, so she provides hints or clues or templates, worksheets is necessary, to kinda show them what they need to do first, what they might consider doing next. She has to teach them how to work together. Teamwork is not something that comes naturally, especially for younger students.

They really need to learn how to do that. Sheela: So we would have a anchor or a set of expectations about what kind of language would be used, what the roles and responsibilities are for each person in that group. Student: So you start with one trail mix and give out stickers. Student: I do the sticker charge thing. Student: Oh, that makes sense. Teacher: So what's this lake potentially used for? Sheela: So it's really the art of facilitation. 10 Practical Ideas For Better Project-Based Learning In Your Classroom. By Jennifer Rita Nichols, TeachThought Intern Teachers are incorporating more and more projects into their curriculum, allowing for much greater levels of collaboration and responsibility for students at all levels. Project- based learning is a popular trend, and even teachers who don’t necessarily follow that approach still see the benefit to using projects to advance their students’ learning.

Projects can be wonderful teaching tools. They can allow for a more student-centred environment, where teachers can guide students in their learning instead of using lectures to provide them with information. The increase in classroom technology also makes projects more accessible to students. Despite general agreement about the benefits of using projects and project-based learning in general, it must be noted that all projects are not created equal! This may happen fairly often because teachers are wary about being able to assign grades to the final assignments handed in to them by students. 4 Keys To Designing A Project-Based Learning Classroom - Traditional American classrooms tend to fit a particular mold: Students face the front of the class where teachers lecture.

Students take notes, finish assignments at home, and hope to memorize enough information just long enough to pass a test. Engagement and passion are often in short supply — among students and teachers. The system does not necessarily accommodate all learning styles, and even those who fair well may be missing out on other important work-life lessons, like how to creatively solve problems, stay focused, work as part of a team, and organize their thoughts in a way others will understand. This is where project-based learning enters the equation. What is Project-Based Learning? Project-based learning, or PBL, is generating a great deal of buzz in the world of education, and is often portrayed as an alternative to passive learning and rote memorization. 4 Must-Follow Rules For Designing A PBL Classroom 1.

One key? 2. PBL is not a paper-pushing style of learning. 3. 4. A World of Project Ideas (You Can Steal) One of the advantages of project-based learning is the flexibility. PBL is an effective instructional strategy within individual content areas as well as across disciplines. It's engaging for young learners and teens alike. Good projects can be short term and tightly focused, or expansive enough to require months of inquiry. The sky's the limit -- which can be a challenge for teachers designing their first projects. Fortunately, you don't have to start from scratch. By borrowing good project ideas from other teachers, and adapting them to fit your context, you can get off to a faster start. Draft on These Ideas Some 600 educators spent the past week thinking hard about project design during the PBL World conference in Napa, Calif., sponsored by Buck Institute for Education.

Here's a sampling of driving questions at the rough draft stage, along with suggestions about PBL planning to fire up your thinking: Notice the phrase, "most influential. " How can we make life sweeter in our community? Project Based Learning: Don’t Start with a Question | The Construction Zone. Do you have to start project-based learning (PBL) with a question? (Oh, wait a second! Am I starting this post with a question?) This is something many people ask. I understand why this is so. Often teachers who are learning about Project Based Learning are encouraged to help students to develop a ‘driving question’ to guide their project. The Buck Institute, for one, suggests that PBL ‘is organized around an open-ended Driving Question’. Tinkering-Based Learning (TBL) Awesome graphic: Page by Giulia Forsythe – @grantpotter Tinkering, Learning & The Adjacent Possible I am going to suggest we consider an alternative I will call TBL – Tinkering-Based Learning!

‘PBL’ is a human-made construct As I have said elsewhere, ‘PBL’ is a human-made construct. Don’t get me wrong! …students should learn to generate ‘driving questions… Nor am I knocking the scientific method – I merely think that is one way of approaching learning and solving problems and becoming an educated person. Flipping PBL Ok. 3 Types Of Project-Based Learning Symbolize Its Evolution. Project-Based Learning is an increasingly popular trend in the 21st century. The best evidence for this popularity might be the nuance it’s taken on. Project-Based Learning has gone from academic study that yields end-of-unit projects, to highly complex methods of creating and publishing student thinking. It is more closely associated with 21st century learning skills than perhaps any other form of learning, and new technology in the classroom is improving its potential exponentially. The Definition Of Project-Based Learning Broadly speaking, Project-Based Learning is simply a method of structuring curriculum around projects.

These projects highlight the process of learning itself by offering authentic, inquiry-based activities for learners to access content, share ideas, and revisit their own thinking. There is a difference between projects and project-based learning, primarily that Project-Based Learning is about the process, and projects are about the product that comes at the end. 1. A World of Project Ideas (You Can Steal) 12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources.

12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources by Shannon Dauphin Project-based learning is becoming increasingly popular as teachers look for a way to make lessons stick in the minds of their students. According to Edutopia, studies have shown that students who use project-based learning remember the material much longer and have healthier attitudes toward education. Project-based learning is based on the idea that students learn best by tackling and solving real world problems. Students are much more engaged with the subject matter and look to the teacher as more of a coach who guides them through their own reflections and ideas. Ready to try project-based learning in your classroom? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. From integrating technology into the classroom to teaching science by hands-on experimentation, project-based learning is not only educational, but often entertaining as well.

Classroom Guide: Top Ten Tips for Assessing Project-Based Learning (now available in Spanish!) Facebook Edutopia on Facebook Twitter Edutopia on Twitter Google+ Pinterest Edutopia on Pinterest WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation What's Inside the PDF? Keep It Real with Authentic Products Don’t Overlook Soft Skills Learn from Big Thinkers Use Formative Strategies to Keep Projects on Track Gather Feedback -- Fast Focus on Teamwork Track Progress with Digital Tools Grow Your Audience Do-It-Yourself Professional Development Assess Better Together BONUS TIP: How to Assemble Your PBL Tool Kit.

What Does a Great School Year Look Like? Ask the Students. Teaching Strategies Shelley Wright Shelley Wright's class constructed a complete Holocaust Museum as part of a school project. This past school year, Shelley Wright, a high school educator in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, made a number of big changes in her teaching practice. The class went paperless and used a Wiki, she incorporated project-based learning and collaboration into her lessons, she experimented with “vessays.”

All along the way, she documented everything on her blog Wright’s Room — not just operational information, but how those changes affected her view of learning and her relationship with her students. It took a lot of courage on Wright’s part to just jump in with these new practices. “I couldn’t rely on the teacher anymore, I had to rely on myself and my classmates; which is a lot harder than you think.”

First, here are some responses from students about the class’s built-from-the-ground-up Holocaust Exhibit, the epitome of project-based learning. Related. Integrated PBL Projects: A Full-Course Meal! Aprendizaje Basado en Proyectos ABP-PBL. PBL. Feedback, feed-forward, peer-assessment and project-based learning. Last year when I began my Masters of Ed, my lecturer told me that I should read about ‘feedback’. She encouraged me to look at the work of Black and Wiliam (Inside the Black Box being their most well known and eloquent paper on feedback and assessment), Hattie (his book Visible Learning on the effect sizes of a variety of teaching methods revealed ‘feedback’ has the most significant impact on learning) and Petty (who used the research of Hattie and made it practical for the classroom in his book ‘Evidence Based Teaching’).

I think I’ll always be grateful for her suggestions as they opened a world of ideas for me regarding assessment, feedback and project-based learning. One of the biggest criticisms of project-based learning is that it is a constructivist pedagogy and constructivism has been shown to have some flaws. So the focus here then, is on assessment again. My students have been working on some written responses to texts as part of their lastest projects. Like this: Project Based Learning. I’ve been teaching using a project-based learning pedagogy since mid-2010 when I was introduced to PBL by my friend, Dean Groom. Since then I have had some wonderful learning experiences with PBL and I enjoy sharing both my successes and failures and experiments in learning on my blog. I thought it’d be helpful for other people if I put all of my PBL-related posts on one page, just in case you’re starting out and you want to see how another teacher is doing it too.

If you have any questions, just post a comment below or send me a tweet on twitter My VERY first experience with PBL – and it was hard work and had serious issues! My post might help some of your PBL newbies feel less anxious, maybe! This is a reflection on my very first PBL experience with Year 10 – it looks at why it may not have been 100% successful. Resources and Tools for PBL Start to Finish. Tips for downloading: PDF files can be viewed on a wide variety of platforms -- both as a browser plug-in or a stand-alone application -- with Adobe's free Acrobat Reader program.

Click here to download the latest version of Adobe Reader. Documents to Help You Get Started The Hunger Games Project Documents Below are sample project-based learning documents from teachers Mary Mobley (English) and Michael Chambers (world history) of Manor New Technology High School in Manor, Texas. Back to Top Culture at Manor New Tech High School Manor Visitors Summary Sheet An overview of Manor New Tech for visitors, including mission statement, learning outcomes, and the school's commitments to their students Learning Outcomes Manor New Tech's learning outcomes for all classes Manor Bell Schedule Daily bell schedule for Manor New Tech Additional Resources on the Web Suggested Reading. Edutopia-10tips-assessing-project-based-learning.pdf. Metodología del ABP. Project-based Learning Framework - Teaching the Teacher. APRENDIZAJE POR PROYECTOS. Metodología del ABP.

Free Classroom Guides and Educational Downloads. PBL Gallery. Home | Getting Started | Modules | Resources | About Us View the work of teachers who developed and implemented PBL units/mini-units. Feel free to download and use the PBL as a template for your work with students. We appreciate your feedback. View additional middle school projects on the STEM-MI Champions Gallery page. Five Keys to Rigorous Project-Based Learning. PBLU.org | Making Projects Click. Project Based Learning | BIE. Problem-Based Learning Project. Cómo empezar en el trabajo por proyectos. 15 documentos imprescindibles para alumnos que trabajan por proyectos. Project Based Learning: Explained.

What It Takes to Become an All Project-Based School | PROJECT BASED LEARNING. Embracing Messy Learning. 5 PBL Best Practices for Redefining the Teacher's Role. "Fitting In" PBL. What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t. Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic.

Blogs on Project-Based Learning. What the Heck Is Project-Based Learning? Project-based Learning Framework - Teaching the Teacher. Twenty Tips for Managing Project-Based Learning. A Great Project Based Learning Checklist for Teachers. Dare to Believe: Problem Based Learning with ICTs by Shelly Terrell on Prezi. Awesome Tools & Apps for Student Projects. How to Implement Problem Based Learning with ICTs. My Top Free Online Tools and Resources for PBL.