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Civil Rights and Protest

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People's Century Part 18 1957 Skin Deep. The Fight For Civil Rights Is Far From Over. American Archive of Public Broadcasting Search Results. 'Is This America?': 50 Years Ago Sharecroppers Challenged Mississippi Apartheid, LBJ, and the Nation. By Julian Hipkins III and Deborah Menkart Fifty years ago this month, Mississippi sharecropper Fannie Lou Hamer gripped the nation with her televised testimony of being forced from her home and brutally beaten (suffering permanent kidney damage) for attempting to exercise her constitutional right to vote.

'Is This America?': 50 Years Ago Sharecroppers Challenged Mississippi Apartheid, LBJ, and the Nation

What Nelson Mandela can teach us all about violence. When journalist and commentator Chris Hedges decried “violent” anarchists as a “cancer” in the Occupy movement, the violence he had in mind amounted to little more than a few smashed commercial windows.

What Nelson Mandela can teach us all about violence

Mandela and the Question of Violence. I was right to be wrong, while you and your kind were wrong to be right.

Mandela and the Question of Violence

—Pierre Courtade I have the misfortune of being near the end of Tony Judt's Postwar at a moment when of the great figures of our history, Nelson Mandela, has passed. Judt's gaze is relentless. Lesson 2: Black Separatism or the Beloved Community? Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. Activity 1.

Lesson 2: Black Separatism or the Beloved Community? Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.

A Journalist's Report: The Better Vision for Black Americans This activity is built around the following sequence of tasks: 1. FBI Monitored Muhammad Ali Over Muslim Ties. Why We Should Teach About the FBI’s War on the Civil Rights Movement. By Ursula Wolfe-Rocca This month marks the 45th anniversary of a dramatic moment in U.S. history.

Why We Should Teach About the FBI’s War on the Civil Rights Movement

On March 8, 1971—while Muhammad Ali was fighting Joe Frazier at Madison Square Garden, and as millions sat glued to their TVs watching the bout unfold—a group of peace activists broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, and stole every document they could find. Keith Forsyth, one of the people who broke in, explained on Democracy Now! : I was spending as much time as I could with organizing against the war, but I had become very frustrated with legal protest. Delivered to the press, these documents revealed an FBI conspiracy—known as COINTELPRO—to disrupt and destroy a wide range of protest groups, including the Black freedom movement. ‘I had it easy: I was never beaten’: fighting segregation in the US south. I was a freshman at Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania, when I first encountered the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and it changed my life.

‘I had it easy: I was never beaten’: fighting segregation in the US south

I used to catch a bus at weekends to Cambridge, Maryland, to work with an inspirational civil rights activist called Gloria Richardson (no relation), who was working with SNCC – pronounced “snick” – to desegregate the city’s public places. ‘Stereotypes of the Black Panthers are far from the truth’: marching in Philadelphia, 1971. When the Black Panthers came to west Philadelphia, their boldness and courage struck a chord with my friends and me.

‘Stereotypes of the Black Panthers are far from the truth’: marching in Philadelphia, 1971

They handed out papers with graphic depictions of black men and women standing up for themselves and demanding freedom. I was 17, and I’d never seen anything like it. I grew up in a predominantly black community of working-class people. Many were children or grandchildren of people who had migrated from the south. 19 maps and charts that explain voting rights in America. 4. Radical Reconstruction. Dana Mejías Teacher San Diego, CA /upload/Mejias.jpg I am a middle school teacher in San Diego and was fortunate enough to attend a SHEG workshop in...

4. Radical Reconstruction

Mark Helman teacher. Electoral College is 'vestige' of slavery, say some Constitutional scholars. The Federal Convention convened in the State House (Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on May 14, 1787, to revise the Articles of Confederation.

Electoral College is 'vestige' of slavery, say some Constitutional scholars

Photo by Library of Congress When the founders of the U.S. Constitution in 1787 considered whether America should let the people elect their president through a popular vote, James Madison said that “Negroes” in the South presented a “difficulty … of a serious nature.” During that same speech on Thursday, July 19, Madison instead proposed a prototype for the same Electoral College system the country uses today. Top 10 Civil Rights Protest Songs Of All Time. Source: Getty Images / Getty Images Martin Luther King knew that the Civil Rights movement needed a soundtrack and that every hero needed theme music.

Top 10 Civil Rights Protest Songs Of All Time

The Civil Rights movement incorporated jazz, folk, R&B and gospel to use music that everybody could relate to and be inspired by to help change America in the 1950s and 1960s. 10. Oh Freedom. Journal E: Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in America. What Happened to the Civil Rights Movement After 1965? Don’t Ask Your Textbook. Fifty years ago this week, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee chairperson Stokely Carmichael made the famous call for “Black Power.” Carmichael’s speech came in the midst of the “March Against Fear,” a walk from Memphis, Tennessee, to Jackson, Mississippi, to encourage African Americans to use their newly won right to vote.

But while almost every middle and high school student learns about the Civil Rights Movement, they rarely learn about this march—or the related struggles that continued long after the Voting Rights Act. Most U.S. History textbooks teach a narrative that the Civil Rights Movement began with the Supreme Court Brown v. Board decision in 1954 and abruptly ended in 1965 with the passage of federal legislation. Making a Change: The First Amendment and the Civil Rights Movement - NewseumED. Jim Crow Museum: Home.

The Jim Crow Museum is open and is FREE to the public. The Museum features six exhibit areas -- Who and What is Jim Crow, Jim Crow Violence, Jim Crow and Anti-Black Imagery, Battling Jim Crow Imagery, Attacking Jim Crow Segregation, and Beyond Jim Crow. The Museum also offers a comprehensive timeline of the African American experience in the United States. The timeline is divided into six sections: Africa Before Slavery, Slavery in America, Reconstruction, Jim Crow, Civil Rights and Post Civil Rights. The Jim Crow Museum at Ferris State University strives to become a leader in social activism and in the discussion of race and race relations.

This facility will provide increased opportunities for education and research. Regular hours are Monday thru Friday 12-5 p.m. Museum Policy Update For Children Visitors to the Jim Crow Museum Policy, please see Contact page.