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How can parents and teachers best educate young children? What principles can both teachers and parents bring to the education of very young children?

How can parents and teachers best educate young children?

Gillian Craig, who was part of the Learning Time with Shaun and Timmy writing team, explains. As teachers and parents, we follow certain principles in our roles. Often though, these principles overlap and all we need to do is recognise and reinforce these areas. Ask (the right) questions When my daughter came out of her class one day shortly after her course started, I asked her, 'What did you do in class today?

'. Listening Skills for Staff. A longitudinal investigation of the role of quantity and quality of child-directed speech in vocabulary development. Being Multilingual: You speak with an accent. I don’t. Accents are things that only other people have.

Being Multilingual: You speak with an accent. I don’t.

They are, by extension, things that you don’t want to have. Accents are, in short, shortcomings. This is why, if someone tells you that “you speak with no accent”, you can be sure of two things: that you have received words of praise indeed; and that you speak with the same accent as that person. So the person is actually not only praising her own accent, she is also giving evidence that she has no idea she’s got one. Being Multilingual: The natives and the speakers. Let me start with the good news.

Being Multilingual: The natives and the speakers

We are, all of us without exception, native speakers. This may come as a surprise to those of us who have had close encounters with the second/foreign language world, but is nonetheless true. It means that we are all competent users of language – more or less competent, of course, depending on all sorts of individual and social factors that make us clumsy or proficient in whatever we do. Now the bad news. Inclusion Development Programme Behaviour Emotional Social Difficulties. B480 Special Need Publication A4 V5 Final MR. Neurodiversity TfS online conference. Teachingenglish.org. ‘I know I have children with special educational needs in my class, I want to help them and we are supposed to promote inclusion, but I really am not sure how to do this’ Vera, primary teacher from Spain ‘Some of the children in my class are really badly behaved, they can’t sit still, don’t finish their work and are always calling out.

teachingenglish.org

I think they might have a learning difficulty, but I don’t know what to do’ Kris, secondary teacher from Poland. Schemas in Children’s Play - N a t u r e P l a y. I Said I Want the Red Bowl! Responding to Toddlers' Irrational Behavior.

Pin It Amelia, told that she can’t have a fifth book before bedtime, shouts: “You are the meanest mommy!

I Said I Want the Red Bowl! Responding to Toddlers' Irrational Behavior

You are not invited to my birthday party!” Derek, when offered a choice between carrots and cheese, not ice cream, before dinner announces: “I don’t like the choices you are choicing me!” Does my toddler have a short attention span because she won’t sit still for a story? A: It is perfectly normal for toddlers to not sit still very long—period.

Does my toddler have a short attention span because she won’t sit still for a story?

Most don’t like to stay in one place for long now that they can explore in so many new ways—by running, jumping, and climbing. So, an adult’s idea of snuggling on the couch to hear a story may not be the same idea a toddler has for story-time. You may only be able to read or talk about a few pages in a book at a time. Here are some ways to engage active children in reading: Las 5 mejores terrazas de Nueva York. Article. How do you speak 'Motherese'?

Deb Roy: The birth of a word. Listen to Your Mother. Young children face a remarkable challenge in learning to use the language of their culture.

Listen to Your Mother

Toddlers vary widely, however, in the rate at which they learn new words.1 A team of Harvard Graduate School of Education researchers set out to ask whether and how children's language environment can impact vocabulary development. In their study of mother-child pairs from low-income families, they found that mothers who used many different words (not just many words) had toddlers with faster growth in vocabulary use.

During the toddler and preschool years, most children learn to use hundreds of words, combining them into sentences and engaging in conversation with others. Let's Talk. What do babies need in order to learn and thrive?

Let's Talk

One thing they need is conversation — responsive, back-and-forth communication with their parents and caregivers. This interactive engagement is like food for their developing brains, nurturing language acquisition, early literacy, school readiness, and social and emotional well-being. A dispiriting number of children don’t get that kind of brain-fueling communication, research suggests. In early childhood policy (and in the wider media), much attention has been paid to the so-called word gap — findings that show that low-income children hear 30 million fewer words, on average, and have less than half the vocabulary of upper-income peers by age three. But putting that alarming number in the spotlight obscures a more critical component of the research, says Harvard Graduate School of Education literacy expert Meredith Rowe: it’s not so much the quantity of words but the quality of the talk that matters most to a child’s development. Why does my toddler love repetition? - BabyCentre.

Paediatric speech and language therapist.

Why does my toddler love repetition? - BabyCentre

It may test your patience when your toddler demands 'Row, row, row your boat' for the 10th time. But there's a good reason for her insistence. How can I help my child to start talking? (Video) - BabyCentre. Health visitor Sara Patience describes how you can help develop your child's language skills by talking and playing with her.

How can I help my child to start talking? (Video) - BabyCentre

Show transcript Hide transcript How can I help my child to start talking? Sara: “You want this one? Between 12 months and two-and-a-half years, there is a lot of language development, and you will hear your child start to use more and more words.