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Consent in the age of big data and connected sex toys. Des sextoys sèment la panique sur le Vieux-Port de Marseille. Vendor Best Practices. Work in progress As a producer of IoD devices, your company is responsible for the safety of your products.

Vendor Best Practices

This should include the safety of your customers data and other information generated through usage of your products. Failure to fully address the risks to security and privacy can lead to a large number of problems for your customers and through market forces, your companies reputation, sales, and perhaps even it's existence. Based on experiences with other related "Internet of Things" (IoT) devices and their common security issues, as well as taking into consideration the unique nature of "Internet of Dongs" connected devices, the following is a far from exhaustive list of best practices and recommendations for the design and operation of these devices, their accompanying software and backend systems. Secure Software Design. Smart sex toy's security flaws fulfil every hacker's fantasy. A connectable dildo suffers from numerous vulnerabilities that make it trivial for attackers to steal users'... well, "private" data.

Smart sex toy's security flaws fulfil every hacker's fantasy

The "Siime Eye," which comes to us from Svakom, is aptly named in that it's a $250-vibrator that for some reason comes with... a camera. All a user needs to do is turn on the device, connect to its AP (SSID: "Siime Eye") using the default password ("888888"), open the Android or iOS app, and "install" it. From there, they can view the livestream or take pictures and video. 240568-objets-connectes-les-victimes-dun-vibromasseur-espion-remportent-leur-... La société canadienne Standard Innovation, accusée par sa clientèle d'avoir omis de révéler que son sex-toy phare collectait leurs données personnelles, a été condamnée à leur payer 3 millions de dollars et à supprimer ces informations.

240568-objets-connectes-les-victimes-dun-vibromasseur-espion-remportent-leur-...

Après de nombreux avertissements venant de hackers et de professionnels de la sécurité, en septembre dernier, une consommatrice de l’Illinois portait plainte contre la société canadienne Standard Innovation. Elle lui reprochait de ne pas avoir stipulé que son produit phare, le sex-toy We-Vibe à la connectivité Bluetooth, transmettait les données personnelle de ses utilisatrices sur ses serveurs, un procédé révélé par des experts à la DefCon de Vegas. Face aux critiques, Standard Innovation s’était alors fendu d’un communiqué pour expliquer sa démarche d’étude de résultats anonymisés — sur la température du produit et son niveau de vibration — et rassurer les clients sur la confidentialité et la sécurité du We-Vibe.

Un sex-toy collectait des données personnelles. We-Vibe vibrator creator to pay damages after spying on user sex lives. Sex toy company Standard Innovation Corp. has agreed to settle a class-action lawsuit following allegations the company spied on customer sex lives without permission.

We-Vibe vibrator creator to pay damages after spying on user sex lives

Two women launched a class-action lawsuit against the company last year in relation to the We-Vibe 4 Plus, dubbed the "No. 1 couples vibrator" which allows users to "connect in new, exciting ways. " That includes with the company that made the toy, it seems. Users are able to connect the product to a smartphone over Bluetooth in order to control the vibrator's modes and intensity settings. In addition, the toy can be remotely controlled through the web so couples apart can still have fun. However, Standard Innovation was accused of using these features to monitor just how much fun users were having -- including the time, date, temperature, and settings -- without permission.

Vibrator maker ordered to pay out C$4m for tracking users' sexual activity. Sex toy maker We-Vibe has agreed to pay customers up to C$10,000 (£6,120) each after shipping a “smart vibrator” which tracked owners’ use without their knowledge.

Vibrator maker ordered to pay out C$4m for tracking users' sexual activity

Following a class-action lawsuit in an Illinois federal court, We-Vibe’s parent company Standard Innovation has been ordered to pay a total of C$4m to owners, with those who used the vibrators associated app entitled to the full amount each. Those who simply bought the vibrator can claim up to $199. Ottawa-based sex toy maker settles privacy lawsuit for $5M. The We-Vibe 4 Plus App Only product is one of several Bluetooth enable devices covered in a recent lawsuit settlement.

Ottawa-based sex toy maker settles privacy lawsuit for $5M

The Ottawa-based maker of a smart sex toy has agreed to a $5 million settlement after two people sued, alleging the vibrator collected some very personal information. A Chicago-area woman, identified in legal documents as N.P., launched the lawsuit against the company back in early September 2016, alleging the company was "selling adult sensual lifestyle products that secretly collected and transmitted highly sensitive information about consumers without their knowledge or consent.

" Another plaintiff, identified as P.S., joined the suit in February 2017. Remember that data-mining smart vibrator? The company's getting sued. In the brave new world of connectivity, even your most intimate moments may come with a heavy dose of data mining.

Remember that data-mining smart vibrator? The company's getting sued.

At the August Def Con conference in Las Vegas, two New Zealand hackers demonstrated that the We-Vibe 4 Plus vibrator was sending information — including device temperature and vibration intensity — back to its manufacturer, Standard Innovation. [Dossier] Le sexe connecté, pour le meilleur et pour le pire. Les films et vidéos pornographiques, tout le monde connaît déjà.

[Dossier] Le sexe connecté, pour le meilleur et pour le pire

Mais il existe aujourd’hui une nouvelle façon d’aborder les relations sexuelles : les objets connectés et la réalité virtuelle. Une nouveauté qui réjouit mais qui soulève une question : la distance peut-elle devenir l’avenir des relations sexuelles ? Don't let wearables ruin your sex life and these special moments. Add to favorites The Apple Watch might be great for many occasions, but try not using it during these activities.

Don't let wearables ruin your sex life and these special moments

Wearables can be great, providing hassle free access to your phone and a number of handy features, but there can be some moments that your Apple Watch might just ruin. CBR has compiled a handy list of times when it’s probably for the best that you aren’t wearing the device. 1. Internet-connected vibrator connects with privacy lawsuit - CNET. An internet-connected vibrator is rubbing at least one consumer the wrong way.

Internet-connected vibrator connects with privacy lawsuit - CNET

A lawsuit, filed earlier this month in a Chicago federal court, alleges Standard Innovation's We-Vibe secretly collects "highly intimate and sensitive" data and transmits it back to the company's servers in real time. The lawsuit, filed by an Illinois woman identified only by the initials N.P., alleges the company collects users' data without their consent in violation of the federal Wiretap Act and the Illinois Eavesdropping Statute, as well as the Illinois Consumer Fraud Act. The We-Vibe, when paired with a smartphone and the We-Connect companion app, allows users to exchange text messages and engage in video chats. It also allows a partner to control the device remotely. The app transmits details such as date and time of each use, the intensity and mode chosen by the user, and the email address of registered users, according to the lawsuit. N.P. v. Maker of Internet of Things-connected vibrator will settle privacy suit.

A few months back, we reported on the collision of the Internet of Things and sex toys. If you can't trust health-related wearables, can you trust sex robots? Hyundai is getting into the business of producing exoskeletons, claiming that it can make Iron Man-like suits much less expensive than other exoskeleton brands priced between $80,000 and $40,000. The H-Mex model in particular is meant to give paraplegics a way to walk, so hopefully Hyundai’s exoskeletons will be downright cheap; then it might be able to accomplish the goal of helping people walk by being affordable for folks on very limited budgets who need it. The crutches used along with the robot-legs have controls like a game controller.

Engadget explained, “One button would move the left leg forward, and the other would move the right. Two Sex Tracking Wearables That Might Actually Make It to Market. Lovely - The smart wearable sex toy for couples. Smart condom ring i.Con is like a Fitbit for your man bits - CNET. The i.Con Smart Condom, which markets itself as the "world's first smart condom," is actually a ring that fits over a boring, dumb condom and claims to track the exercise of your man bits, as well as detect chlamydia and syphilis. The ring, first announced last July, is currently available for preorder on British Condoms for £59.99 (about $74, AU$97) with an unknown release date. But you can't actually put a ring on it yet -- the company says it won't take your money until the product has a firm release.

In short, the i.Con ring promises to answer every burning question you've ever had about your sex session. Don't worry, it will pair with an app for all your data visualization needs. According to the preorder page, the ring will answer questions such as: