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Growing-concerns-in-canada-over-surgical-mesh-usage-recalls-1. Warning: Some of the content may be disturbing to some viewers There is growing concern over the number of recalls of hernia mesh in Canada, as patients speak out about complications they believe are linked to the surgical device.

growing-concerns-in-canada-over-surgical-mesh-usage-recalls-1

Patients across the country contacted CTV News after a story on health problems linked to hernia mesh aired last month. Patient Ivan Richardson said his hernia mesh has caused him ongoing, unexplained pain. "You couldn't even touch me, I would cry, I mean literally cry and I went to the doctor and they kept saying they couldn't find nothing," Richardson said in an interview with CTV News. That is until one doctor cut open his abdomen. Even with part of it removed, Richardson said he still suffers. "It will feel like a bunch of little needles," he said. Canadian patients join class-action suit over recalled hernia mesh. Karolyn Coorsh, CTVNews.ca Published Tuesday, March 28, 2017 10:00PM EDT Last Updated Wednesday, March 29, 2017 12:22PM EDT Some Canadian hernia surgery patients have launched a class-action lawsuit against the maker of a now-recalled surgical mesh, claiming they weren't warned of its dangers.

Canadian patients join class-action suit over recalled hernia mesh

Patients are speaking out about a surgical device called Physiomesh Flexible Composite Mesh, which was used in Canada up until last year, when it was recalled and pulled from the market over concerns about higher rates of complications. The mesh is made by Ethicon, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson. It became available on the Canadian market in September, 2010. In June 2016, Health Canada issued a recall for Physiomesh after the manufacturers learned that the recurrence and reoperation rates after hernia repair using the mesh were higher than the average rates of other meshes.

Linking the research: from FBR to implant materials to autoimmune disease initiation or exacerbation -  Links to Medical  Mesh  Research. CTV National News: A warning for women. CTVNews.ca Digital Extra: Ongoing infections. Ctvnews. Hysterectomy Information - Transvaginal Mesh: One Woman's Private Hell  I wonder...

Hysterectomy Information - Transvaginal Mesh: One Woman's Private Hell 

Ten years from now when the medical community and government health authorities look back on this unfolding medical travesty, how will they feel knowing they did little or next-to-nothing for women suffering from synthetic mesh complications? Will their consciences bother them that they denied the seriousness and devastating results that delays in skilled surgical intervention caused?

Will they connect marginalization of women’s health care with their unwillingness to question and investigate the complaints, concerns and cries from women who have not been helped by knowledgeable doctors? We need access to knowledgeable specialists in the field of Foreign Body Response. I wonder... I wonder... Unfortunately for some ladies, the effects of the negative systemic reaction and resulting damage from autoimmune diseases like Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus, the damage is done.

I wonder... Hernia patches caused infections, lawsuit says. A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of Canadians who received a medical device that was supposed to lead to successful hernia surgery, but that may have severely injured some patients instead.

Hernia patches caused infections, lawsuit says

The device is called the Kugel mesh. It was a patch used to repair the hole in the abdominal wall caused by hernias. Thousands of the patches have been used for hernia surgeries in Canada and most have caused no problems. But dozens of patients have developed serious complications and are now hoping to sue. What's more, lawyers working on the lawsuit say there could be many more patients suffering as well.

Kristie Pells, 39, is part of the $300-million class action suit. So in 2003, she had surgery that included using a Kugel mesh to reinforce her abdominal wall. Pells says she had no problems for five years. "It was almost like a burning sensation, which I thought was a little peculiar. She says the fluid was caused by a life-threatening infection that had developed in her abdomen. Dying in secret. Transparency and accountability are words that politicians like to throw around.

Dying in secret

But putting these words into practice is usually difficult. That’s because the disclosure of information often proves to be embarrassing, so there’s a natural tendency to reduce rather than increase transparency. Lawsuits being settled in surgical mesh complications. CTVNews.ca Staff Published Tuesday, January 13, 2015 10:03PM EST Last Updated Tuesday, January 13, 2015 11:40PM EST The first Canadian lawsuits are being settled for women who suffer pain and internal damage from plastic mesh implanted following surgery.

Lawsuits being settled in surgical mesh complications

Transvaginal mesh is used in some women who have undergone hysterectomies, or who have had procedures done to treat incontinence and organ prolapse after childbirth. Though the material is safe in most patients, sometimes the plastic can shift or break off inside the patient, causing excruciating pain and piercing organs. Catherine Buote is among the first 35 Canadian women who will be compensated by the makers of the mesh she had used on her in 2008.

She’s had 18 surgeries so far to remove the mesh and repair damage caused by the material. Still, some of the mesh can’t be removed, and Buote in unable to work. “I am now on permanent disability for the rest of my life, and I am 31,” she says. CTV National News: A warning for women. News Video - Top National News Headlines - News Videos. Linking the research: from FBR to implant materials to autoimmune disease initiation or exacerbation -  Links to Medical  Mesh  Research. Surgical Mesh - Complications Associated with Transvaginal Implantation for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse - Notice to Hospitals - Recalls & alerts. Related AWRs Notice about Health Canada advisories NOTICE TO HOSPITALS - Health Canada Issued Important Safety Information on Surgical Mesh for Stress Urinary Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse May 13, 2014 To: Hospital Chief of Medical Staff Please distribute to the relevant Departments of Surgery, Gynecology, Urology, Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Intensive Care and other involved professional staff and post this NOTICE in your institution.

Surgical Mesh - Complications Associated with Transvaginal Implantation for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse - Notice to Hospitals - Recalls & alerts

Airdrie woman files class-action lawsuit against U.S.-based manufacturer of pelv. The U.S. maker of a “pelvic mesh” implant used to treat bladder problems “put its profits ahead of patient safety,” claims a class action lawsuit filed by an Airdrie woman.

Airdrie woman files class-action lawsuit against U.S.-based manufacturer of pelv

The woman’s claim, filed in Calgary Court of Queen’s Bench, seeks a minimum of $500,000 for each person implanted with a pelvic mesh product made by Cook Inc. of Bloomington, Indiana. It also asks for $20 million in punitive damages “for the reckless and unlawful conduct of the defendants.” The claim alleges the devices put patients at significant risk for a multitude of complications. More women seek surgery to relieve pain from transvaginal mesh. CTVNews.ca Staff Published Tuesday, February 19, 2013 10:00PM EST Last Updated Tuesday, February 19, 2013 11:20PM EST More women are coming forward to say they are living in agony from the transvaginal plastic mesh they have had implanted to treat incontinence or complications from hysterectomies, and some are also having difficulty finding a Canadian doctor willing to remove it.

More women seek surgery to relieve pain from transvaginal mesh

The implants have been linked to severe complications, including pain, infection and even pieces of mesh perforating internal organs, and thousands of women in Canada and the United States have filed lawsuits against the products’ makers. Now, not only are more Canadian women complaining that the mesh is having a debilitating effect on their lives, some say they have been forced to travel to the U.S. to have it removed. Lawsuits being settled in surgical mesh complications. Surgical Mesh - Complications Associated with Transvaginal Implantation for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse - Notice to Hospitals - Recalls & alerts - Healthy Canadians Website.

Implanted Medical Devices. Cardiac devices dominate the list of reports to the Food and Drug Administration of deaths and injuries.

Implanted Medical Devices

Here are three devices that have had significant problems in recent years: Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Since 2009, the FDA has received reports of close to 29,000 deaths or injuries from these devices, by far the most for any device type, according to our analysis of the FDA’s database of adverse events. Implanted in more than a half-million Americans with serious heart disorders, the defibrillators detect abnormal rhythms and administer shocks to correct them. The most troublesome aspect of the devices are the leads—wires that connect them to the heart. In congressional testimony in 2009, Boston cardiologist William Maisel, M.D., described what happened to a patient of his: “The simple act of removing his shirt over his head caused his … lead to fracture. Vena cava filters. Many should be removed once the danger of clots has passed, but often aren’t. Vaginal Mesh Issues on Pinterest. Health Canada Warns of Serious, Life-Altering Complications Associated with Transvaginal Mesh.

Health Canada, the country’s health regulating agency, has issued a safety notice to hospitals warning of complications associated with transvaginal mesh used to treat pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). According to the notice, issued on Tuesday, the agency had previously warned about these risks in February 2010.