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Star Trek Enterprise Pizza Cutter Boldly cut pizza where no man has cut before! $29.99 NASA Worm Logo 4.5" Sticker - Red Get your own piece of NASA history! $6.95 Star Wars Han Solo in Carbonite Silicone Ice Cube Tray Freeze your own Han Solo! Here comes an innovative Star Wars kitchen product from a galax... $11.99 NASA 'Meatball' Official Logo 4.5" Sticker - Full Color NASA Logo Sticker - 4" Great for party favors, books, bikes and more. $4.95 50 Years of Human Spaceflight - Regular Print Poster (12"x44") Celebrate five decades of human spaceflight with our exclusive wall poster, measuring 12”... $11.99 Solar Racers Sun Powered Micro VehiclesTake'em outside and watch'em race. $7.95 Meteorite 3-Pack Own a real piece of space. Learn More at Space.com. From Satellites to Stars, NASA informat

Science News, Articles and Information | Scientific American

Science News, Articles and Information | Scientific American NOVA Energy LabHelp design energy systems that meet demand and save the greatest amount of carbon emissions for the least amount of moneyAstro Drone Crowdsourcing GameIf you own a Parrot AR.Drone Quadricopter, you can participate in the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Astro Drone crowdsourcing game to help improve robot visionWeddell Seal Population CountHelp scientists in the field monitor the Weddell seal population in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica
Homepage - Large Hadron Collider LHC Computing Grid Globe (Credit: CERN) The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful particle accelerator ever built. Based at the European particle physics laboratory CERN, near Geneva in Switzerland, it is the world’s largest laboratory and is dedicated to the pursuit of fundamental science. The LHC allows scientists to reproduce the conditions that existed within a billionth of a second after the Big Bang.

Homepage - Large Hadron Collider

A European researcher has interpreted carvings in a 32,500-year-old ivory tablet as a pattern of the same stars that we see in the sky today in the constellation Orion. The tablet is a sliver of ivory from the tusk of a mammoth — a large woolly animal like an elephant. Mammoths are extinct today. Carved into the ivory is what appears to be a carving of a human figure with outstretched arms and legs. The pose suggests the stars of Orion, according to Michael Rappenglueck, formerly of the University of Munich, known for his interpretation of ancient star charts painted on walls of prehistoric caves. Space Today Online -- Solar System Planet Earth -- Ancient Astro Space Today Online -- Solar System Planet Earth -- Ancient Astro
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Science news and science jobs from New Scientist

The 12th Planet, Planet X Files, Space and Science Anomalies

The Twelfth Planet : Book I of the Earth Chronicles by Zecharia Sitchin; This is Sitchin's first book. By translating Sumerian texts he was able to come up with the history of aliens visiting our planet about 450,00 years ago. They came from a planet called Marduk or Nibiru which is on a huge eliptical orbit around our Sun. The 12th Planet, Planet X Files, Space and Science Anomalies
Extrasolar Planets - Explore the Cosmos
Strange Matter
LHC Machine Outreach LHC Machine Outreach The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is built in a circular tunnel 27 km in circumference. The tunnel is buried around 50 to 175 m. underground. It straddles the Swiss and French borders on the outskirts of Geneva. The first beams were circulated successfully on 10th September 2008. Unfortunately on 19th September a serious fault developed damaging a number of superconducting magnets. The repair required a long technical intervention.
At 90, Freeman Dyson Ponders His Next Challenge By Thomas Lin, Quanta Magazine Monday, March 31 2 Comments Freeman Dyson — the world-renowned mathematical physicist who helped found quantum electrodynamics with the bongo-playing, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman and others, devised numerous mathematical techniques, led the team that designed a low-power nuclear reactor that produces medical isotopes for research hospitals, dreamed of exploring the solar system in spaceships propelled by nuclear bombs, wrote technical and popular science books, penned dozens of reviews for The New York Review of Books, and turned 90 in December — is pondering a new math problem. Renewables Aren’t Enough. Clean Coal Is the Future By Charles C. Science - News for Your Neurons Science - News for Your Neurons