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Memory & Learning Process

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This One Equation May Be the Root of Intelligence. How to Build a Mind? This Learning Theory May Hold the Answer. How do intelligent minds learn?

How to Build a Mind? This Learning Theory May Hold the Answer

Coup de tonnerre dans le domaine des neurosciences : le cerveau humain a une capacité de stockage 10 fois plus importante que ce que l'on pensait auparavant. Actualités > À Chaud > Coup de tonnerre dans le domaine des neurosciences...

Coup de tonnerre dans le domaine des neurosciences : le cerveau humain a une capacité de stockage 10 fois plus importante que ce que l'on pensait auparavant

Learning To Learn Faster: The One Superpower Everyone Needs. Watch: What Is Consciousness? We Now Have the Tools to Find Out. The question of consciousness is as old as philosophy.

Watch: What Is Consciousness? We Now Have the Tools to Find Out

And while the exact nature of human consciousness is exceedingly difficult to pin down—that doesn’t stop us from trying. It's a puzzle that's preoccupied the world’s greatest philosophers for millennia and, in recent centuries, scientists too. In the information age, we've begun to wonder if consciousness is a uniquely biological phenomenon or if it might arise elsewhere. Is the brain just a mushy computer running wetware—something we can replicate in hardware and software? How the Brain Makes Memories: Scientists Tap Memory’s Neural Code - Singularity HUB. Some of our most treasured memories begin with a simple association: the smiling face of that special someone, tied forever to the place where you first met.

How the Brain Makes Memories: Scientists Tap Memory’s Neural Code - Singularity HUB

Sadly, these episodic memories — memories that encode life events — are often eroded in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease or traumatic brain injury. Without tapping into the basic neural code that underlies these associations, scientists are limited in how they can help people suffering from memory loss. However, thanks to a new study published in the July issue of Neuron, we are a step closer to understanding how our brains place people into context.

The answer lies in a handful of single neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), which rapidly change their firing patterns at the exact moment someone learns a new association between person and place. The story begins more than a decade ago, when the study’s senior author, Dr. It’s like what happens in real life, says Ison. But it’s not just about single neurons. Brain Synapses Last as Long as Memories do. Our memories are stored in brain connections called synapses.

Brain Synapses Last as Long as Memories do

And according to a new Nature study, synapses aren’t permanent structures: They only last as long as the memories they store. Brain Cells Break Their Own DNA to Allow Memories to Form. New Math Model Shows How Neural Networks Create Memories. Scientists at EPFL have uncovered mathematical equations behind the way the brain forms – and even loses – memories.

New Math Model Shows How Neural Networks Create Memories

Memory is one of the most crucial elements of life. Without memory, there is no learning; without learning there is no invention, progress, or civilization. On the flipside, forgetting some experiences, especially traumatic ones, can help regain mental health and function. Closer to AI: Electronic Long-Term Memory Cells Mirror Human BrainTrending. Memory is one of the more complex functions of the human brain.

Closer to AI: Electronic Long-Term Memory Cells Mirror Human BrainTrending

Leaving alone the debate about the accuracy of memory and the perceptual and psychological aspects of it, for purposes of this article let’s focus simply on the human brain’s ability to store and process multiple information threads simultaneously. That was what a research team at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology used to construct an electronic multi-state memory cell at the university’s MicroNano Research Facility (MNRF).

Newly developed memory nano cells can process strata of information simultaneously. Image Credit: phys.org. The best brain supplement to delay memory and thinking decline: A mentally stimulating job. By: SharpBrains Chal­leng­ing Work Tasks May Have an Upside for the Brain (new study):

The best brain supplement to delay memory and thinking decline: A mentally stimulating job

Neurons Busily Rewrite Their DNA NonstopTrending. Scientists from Johns Hopkins have found that neurons are not risk-averse, if fact, they use minor "DNA surgeries" to toggle their activity levels 24/7.

Neurons Busily Rewrite Their DNA NonstopTrending

Since these activity levels are important in learning, memory, and brain disorders, the researchers believe their finding will shed light on several key questions. These are images of mouse neurons from the hippocampal region of the brain. Levels of the surface receptor GluR1, orange, are shown in unmodified neurons, left, and in those with increased levels of Tet3, right. Image Credit: Huimei Yu, Johns Hopkins Medicine "We used to think that once a cell reaches full maturation, its DNA is totally stable, including the molecular tags attached to it to control its genes and maintain the cell's identity," says Hongjun Song, PhD, professor of neurology and neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's Institute for Cell Engineering. How brain waves guide memory formation. Our brains generate a constant hum of activity: As neurons fire, they produce brain waves that oscillate at different frequencies.

How brain waves guide memory formation

Long thought to be merely a byproduct of neuron activity, recent studies suggest that these waves may play a critical role in communication between different parts of the brain. A new study from MIT neuroscientists adds to that evidence. The researchers found that two brain regions that are key to learning — the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex — use two different brain-wave frequencies to communicate as the brain learns to associate unrelated objects. Whenever the brain correctly links the objects, the waves oscillate at a higher frequency, called “beta,” and when the guess is incorrect, the waves oscillate at a lower “theta” frequency. How "SuperAger" Brains Are Different Than Everyone Else's.

Researchers working with SuperAgers—people aged 80 and up with impeccable memory—reveal how their brains look decades younger. And compared to others their age, SuperAgers have nearly 90 percent fewer brain “tangles” linked to Alzheimer’s disease. The findings were published in the Journal of Neuroscience last week. First identified in 2007, the so-called cognitive SuperAgers displayed memories as sharp as people 20 to 30 years younger than them. In a preliminary study, researchers found that a particular region of their cortex was thicker than that of middle-aged participants. Now, in a more detailed study, a Northwestern University team led by Tamar Gefen used MRI scans to image the brains of 31 SuperAgers, and they also conducted postmortem investigations with five who donated their brains to science.

That particular region of the cortex, called the anterior cingulate cortex, influences cognitive control, conflict resolution, and perseverance. Long Term Memories May Not Be Stored In Synapses Afterall. It has long been believed that memories were stored in the synapses of neurons. So, when those synapses were destroyed, the memories they held must be lost as well. However, a new study involving marine snails known as Aplysia has found that this might not be the case. If true, this could lead to memory restoration for patients with early onset Alzheimer's. David Glanzman of UCLA was senior author of the paper, which was published in eLife. Steve Ramirez and Xu Liu: A mouse. A laser beam. A manipulated memory. Close. Scientists Discover A Process That Regulates Forgetting. La tête d’un ver décapité repousse… avec sa mémoire.

New Neurons Erase Old Memories In Mice. Scientists Selectively Erase And Restore Memories.