Economic is an essential topic for life. If you are working, understanding economics will help you understanding how are the products and services of your company relate to the markets and consumers. Why some products can mark the price so high and still there are demands on purchase? How services and products decrease its value? All of those questions can be answered by basic economics knowledge. Fifty Essential Topics on Economics Fifty Essential Topics on Economics
Online economics textbooks

Economic Issues

Politics While not an economist in the traditional sense, I am very interested in the study of economics. While not everyone shares this level of interest, I believe people should have an understanding of economics as the field is so important to understanding the world that we live in. Though this list contains ideas that are controversial, it is not intended to promote anger or controversy. Economic Issues
Deflation
A Trillion Dollars
Startups Life sciences startups outgrow their San Francisco incubators by Ron Leuty

Economy 1929 v 2008

Economy 1929 v 2008
"A growing economy consists of prices falling, not rising." The stock market does not work the way most people think. A commonly held belief — on Main Street as well as on Wall Street — is that a stock-market boom is the reflection of a progressing economy: as the economy improves, companies make more money, and their stock value rises in accordance with the increase in their intrinsic value. A major assumption underlying this belief is that consumer confidence and consequent consumer spending are drivers of economic growth. A stock-market bust, on the other hand, is held to result from a drop in consumer and business confidence and spending — due to inflation, rising oil prices, high interest rates, etc., or for no reason at all — that leads to declining business profits and rising unemployment.

How the Stock Market and Economy Really Work

How the Stock Market and Economy Really Work

Eurozone debt web

Eurozone debt web The circle below shows the gross external, or foreign, debt of some of the main players in the eurozone as well as other big world economies. The arrows show how much money is owed by each country to banks in other nations. The arrows point from the debtor to the creditor and are proportional to the money owed as of the end of June 2011. The colours attributed to countries are a rough guide to how much trouble each economy is in.
Photo Credit: john flanigan November 30, 2011 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. Wall St's "Secret Government" Wall St's "Secret Government"