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Animated interactive of the history of the Atlantic slave trade. Source: slavevoyages.org For the full interactive version, use a larger device. Interactive by Andrew Kahn. Background image by Tim Jones. Usually, when we say “American slavery” or the “American slave trade,” we mean the American colonies or, later, the United States. Three Geography Games Based on Google Maps and Google Earth One of the things that I emphasize to students before they embark on any kind of research or problem-solving task is to take a good long look at the information that they already have before them. To that end, I'll often request that they construct a list of what they know about a topic or problem before they begin to search. Playing one of the following three Google Maps-based games is a fun way to reinforce the concept of using prior knowledge and observations. GeoGuessr is an addictive geography game that is based on the Google Maps Street View imagery. When you visit GeoGuessr you can choose to play as a single player or you can register to challenge another player. The game is played the same way whether you choose single player or challenge mode.

Capital Toss: Capital Cities ABCya is the leader in free educational computer games and mobile apps for kids. The innovation of a grade school teacher, ABCya is an award-winning destination for elementary students that offers hundreds of fun, engaging learning activities. Millions of kids, parents, and teachers visit ABCya.com each month, playing over 1 billion games last year. Apple, The New York Times, USA Today, Parents Magazine and Scholastic, to name just a few, have featured ABCya’s popular educational games. ABCya’s award-winning Preschool computer games and apps are conceived and realized under the direction of a certified technology education teacher, and have been trusted by parents and teachers for ten years.

13 Mysterious Historical Monuments People who lived thousands of years before us created some striking buildings. These buildings were so extensive that scientists have been looking for centuries for answers to who, why, and most importantly, how they were built. There are all different kinds of theories, from practical to extraterrestrial. Education Available languages — Using OpenStreetMap in an Educational Context For information about academic research related to OpenStreetMap, see Research. For a general article about how to map educational facilities in OpenStreetMap, see Education features. Students learning about OpenStreetMap at a workshop at FEATI University in the Philippines The War in Vietnam: 50 Years Later – Amit Shah The following introduction was developed by Amit Shah, Managing Director of Green Comma, as a prologue to the chronological middle and high school text by Tom Barber. Tom is a veteran in education publishing and has been the publisher and editorial director for social studies at the nation’s leading US textbook publishing companies. The material is being offered, free, as a teaching and discussion resource in middle, high school, and freshman college classrooms. WE REQUEST THAT CREDIT IS CITED FOR ANY REUSE.

From Ptolemy to GPS, the Brief History of Maps Last spring, a 23-year-old woman was driving her car through the Ontario town of Tobermory. It was unfamiliar territory for her, so she was dutifully following her GPS. Indeed, she was so intent on following the device that she didn’t notice that her car was headed straight for Georgian Bay—so she drove down a boat launch and straight into the frigid water. She thankfully managed to climb out and swim to shore, as her bright red Yaris sank beneath the waves. Fly Through A Colossal Cave: Son Doong in 360° By Jane J. Lee Interactive and photographs by Martin Edström Son Doong is one of the world's largest caves, with enormous chambers that can comfortably fit a 747 airplane or an entire New York City block full of 40-story buildings. Its mammoth chambers extend so far that explorers have called Son Doong an "infinite cave." And with an amazing new digital tour, you can plunge below ground to see it yourself without ever leaving the country.

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