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Essay: Anatomy of the Deep State

Essay: Anatomy of the Deep State
Rome lived upon its principal till ruin stared it in the face. Industry is the only true source of wealth, and there was no industry in Rome. By day the Ostia road was crowded with carts and muleteers, carrying to the great city the silks and spices of the East, the marble of Asia Minor, the timber of the Atlas, the grain of Africa and Egypt; and the carts brought out nothing but loads of dung. That was their return cargo. — The Martyrdom of Man by Winwood Reade (1871) There is the visible government situated around the Mall in Washington, and then there is another, more shadowy, more indefinable government that is not explained in Civics 101 or observable to tourists at the White House or the Capitol. During the last five years, the news media have been flooded with pundits decrying the broken politics of Washington. These are not isolated instances of a contradiction; they have been so pervasive that they tend to be disregarded as background noise. Photo: Dale Robbins

http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/21/anatomy-of-the-deep-state/

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