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DNA Learning Center

DNA Learning Center

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3D Animation Library Animations can be viewed within your web browser or downloaded for play from your computer. In some genes the protein-coding sections of the DNA ("exons") are interrupted by non-coding regions ("introns"). RNA splicing removes the introns from pre mRNA to produce the final set of instructions for the protein. Transcript: As DNA is transcribed into RNA it needs to be edited to remove non-coding regions, or introns, shown in green. Genetics Photos: George Barrowclough: courtesy of R.J. Gutierrez; Humpback whales, Howard Rosenbaum: courtesy of Peter J. Ersts, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, AMNH; Owl: John and Karen Hollingsworth, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Yael Wyner: courtesy of Yael Wyner; Joel Cracraft: courtesy of Joel Cracraft; Sumatran Tiger: courtesy of Jessie Cohen, Smithsonian's National Zoo; Lemur: courtesy of Duke University Primate Center; Daniela Calcagnotto: Courtesy of Daniela Calcagnotto; Pacu: courtesy of Leonard Lovshin, Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquacultures, Auburn University; St. Vincent parrots, Mike Russello: courtesy of Mike Russello; Illustrations: Louis Pappas, Steve Thurston, Eric Hamilton

Why do so many men have red beards but not red hair? (Well it isn't due to their soul) You probably will see a lot of dark-haired men growing a ginger beard. It has to do with the fact that your genes that determine hair color are pretty sceptic. As growing a beard is becoming a thing for the masses(and not only a hipster thing). You probably will see a lot of dark-haired men growing a ginger beard. Smarthistory: a multimedia web-book about art and art history Smarthistory offers more than 1500 videos and essays on art from around the world and across time. We are working with more than 200 art historians and some of the world's most important museums to make the best art history resource anywhere. Use the "subject" pulldown menu (go to "Arts and Humanities") at the top of this window or click on the headings below to access our content: Art history basics First things first (you are here) The materials and techniques artists use Art 1010

3D Animation Library Animations can be viewed within your web browser or downloaded for play from your computer. In some genes the protein-coding sections of the DNA ("exons") are interrupted by non-coding regions ("introns"). RNA splicing removes the introns from pre mRNA to produce the final set of instructions for the protein. Transcript: As DNA is transcribed into RNA it needs to be edited to remove non-coding regions, or introns, shown in green. This editing process is called splicing, which involves removing the introns, leaving only the yellow, protein-coding regions, called exons.

Bugscope: Browse the archives The following papers have been published in the journals listed. If the journal articles are not reprinted as part of the ITG Technical Reports listed above, contact your local library for assistance in obtaining copies of these journals. M. Korb and U. Thakkar, (2011) Facilitating scientific investigations and training data scientists. SCIENCE, 333, pp.534-535. British Isles mapped out by genetic ancestry Stephen Leslie Researchers have found genetic signatures among Britons that betray their historical roots in particular locales of the UK, leading to the finest-scale map of genetic variation yet created. The analysis — which shows a snapshot of clusters of genetic variation in the late 1800s, when people were less likely to migrate far from their region of birth — reflects historical waves of migration by different populations into the island.

No Sex Needed: All-Female Lizard Species Cross Their Chromosomes to Make Babies Since the 1960s scientists have known that some species of whiptail lizards need a male even less than a fish needs a bicycle. These all-lady lizard species (of the Aspidoscelis genus) from Mexico and the U.S. Southwest manage to produce well-bred offspring without the aid of male fertilization. But how do they—and the other 70 species of vertebrates that propagate this way—do it without the genetic monotony and disease vulnerability that often results from asexual reproduction? "It has remained unclear" and "has been the topic of much speculation," report a team of researchers who aimed to answer just that question. Their results were published online February 21 in the journal Nature.

Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching Return to MERLOT II Home Page Search all MERLOT Select to go to your profile Click to expand login or register menu Select to go to your workspace Genome BC Education Videos Check these cool animations and movies to learn more about genetics, genomics, dna and more: See all of our videos at our Youtube Channel: Pakistan's Malala Yousufzai celebrates 16th birthday with UN speech A powerful speech. "Let us pick up our books and our pens. They are our most powerful weapons"

Genome hacker uncovers largest-ever family tree Andrew Bret Wallis/Getty Images Using data pulled from online genealogy sites, a renowned ‘genome hacker’ has constructed what is likely the biggest family trees ever assembled. The researcher and his team now plan to use the data — including a single uber-pedigree comprising 13 million individuals, which stretches back to the fifteenth century — to analyse the inheritance of complex genetic traits, such as longevity and fertility. In addition to providing the invitation list to what would be the world’s largest family reunion, the work presented by computational biologist Yaniv Erlich at the American Society of Human Genetics annual meeting in Boston could provide a new tool for understanding the extent to which genes contribute to certain traits. The pedigrees have been made available to other researchers, but Erlich and his team at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, have stripped the names from the data to protect privacy.

Blame Your Neanderthal Genes For Your Allergies If you suffer from hayfever in spring or food allergies, you might want to blame a Neanderthal or Denisovan ancestor. The interspecies mating that accounts for a small proportion of our genome has given some people a hyper-alert immune system, providing extra protection at the cost of overreacting to harmless pollen or foods. People of European descent have inherited between 1 and 6 percent of their genome from Neanderthals, although the circumstances under which the mating occurred remain unknown. Genome British Columbia Make DNA Jewelery featuring Your Name! Download an Activity sheet with photos Materials

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