background preloader

Positive Reinforcement - Tips for parenting

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xC4wSO3IDYg

Related:  Reinforcement and Punishment on Teenagers: A Guide for ParentsHow Reinforcement And Punishment Can Help Parents In Influencing The Behavior Of Teenage ChildrenReinforcement vs. Punishment for TeenagersA Guide for Parents: Reinforcement & Punishment in TeenagersReinforcement and Punishment: How parents affect the behaviour of their teenage children

Developmental Psychology at Vanderbilt Jacob Lee and Matthew Snodgress There is no one individual who influences the development of a child more than the parent. Every aspect of the child’s progression through life, beginning with their genetic makeup, is greatly influenced, if not completely determined by, the parent figure in the child’s life. Parent figures choose the climate which the child will grow up in. Whether that is in regard to family dynamics, intellectual stimulation, or social development. One way parents dictate the development of their child is through discipline.

Reinforcement vs. Punishment: What They Are & 12 Examples "Reinforcement is anything that increases the likelihood that a person will exhibit the same behavior again in the future," says licensed psychologist Nicole Beurkens, Ph.D., CNS. "You are aiming to increase a desired behavior such as speaking politely, doing chores, playing nicely with siblings, and so on." And chances are you're likely doing this already in some capacity: You praise your kid for tidying up after themselves, you compliment them after getting good grades in school, you take them out for a treat after hitting a milestone or doing well in an extracurricular. As Pressman tells us, it's simply "giving kids attention for a certain behavior." However, reinforcement can backfire, if done incorrectly. And this comes back to promoting intrinsic motivation, versus extrinsic.

Discipline for Teens: Strategies and Challenges When your child becomes a teenager, your parenting role is likely to shift. You may find yourself becoming more of a guide, rather than an enforcer. That’s not to say your child won’t need you to intervene when there are safety issues or that your teen won’t need consequences. But, by now, it’s OK to let your child make some choices on their own, even when you think it’s a bad choice. Typical Teen Behavior 12 Examples of Positive Punishment & Negative Reinforcement You might be thinking that “positive punishment” sounds like an oxymoron, after all, how can punishment be positive? Not many people “like” punishment, right? The disconnect in understanding this concept comes from the usage of the word “positive;” here at PositivePsychology.com, we generally use the term “positive” to refer to things that are inherently good, things that are life-giving, and things that promote thriving and flourishing. The concept of positive punishment comes from a very different era and a very different perspective on psychology; namely, the 1930s and behaviorism. So, what actually is positive punishment and how does it relate to parenting, teaching, and even the workplace? Before you read on, we thought you might like to download our 3 Positive Psychology Exercises for free.

It’s Not Discipline, It’s a Teachable Moment WHETHER facing a toddler temper tantrum or an insolent adolescent, every parent struggles to find the best way to discipline children. But many parents fail. A recent study found that 1 in 3 say the methods they use simply don’t work.

How to Use Positive Reinforcement to Improve Your Child's Behavior When your child misbehaves, rewards might be the last thing on your mind. But, positive reinforcement can be one of the most effective behavior modification techniques.1 You can use positive reinforcement to encourage prosocial behaviors, like sharing or following directions. And, you can use it to prevent misbehavior, like hitting and rule violations. Positive reinforcement can also be an effective way to encourage and motivate your child to be responsible, do their chores, get along with their siblings, or complete their homework assignments without arguing. How Positive Reinforcement Works Most adults go to work so they can receive a paycheck.

Positive vs Negative Reinforcement: Which Is More Effective? Table of Content: 1. What is Reinforcement? Why Negative Reinforcement Works Better as Your Child Grows into A Teen If you are someone who has always loved the freedom of “no strings attached”, the idea of marrying and having kids could be quite underwhelming. The idea of having a family always used to bug me, until I finally found the love of my life. It's when I categorically made up my mind about what I wanted from our marriage. Negative Reinforcement: What Is It and How Does It Work? What is negative reinforcement? Negative reinforcement is a method that can be used to help teach specific behaviors. With negative reinforcement, something uncomfortable or otherwise unpleasant is taken away in response to a stimulus. Over time, the target behavior should increase with the expectation that the unpleasant thing will be taken away.

Teens May Learn Best with Positive Reinforcement A new study finds that adolescents focus on rewards and are less able to learn to avoid punishment or consider the consequences of alternative actions. University College-London investigators compared how adolescents and adults learn to make choices based on the available information. Investigators tracked the way in which 18 volunteers aged 12-17 and 20 volunteers aged 18-32 completed tasks in which they had to choose between abstract symbols. Each symbol was consistently associated with a fixed chance of a reward, punishment, or no outcome.

Positive Reinforcement in Teenagers Teenagers might need special incentives to learn skills, develop responsibility and make positive decisions about their conduct. One effective way to encourage the behaviors you want is to use the behavior management technique of positive reinforcement. Through positive reinforcement, you gradually make it more likely that your teenager will demonstrate the desired behaviors. Goals of Positive Reinforcement The beauty of positive reinforcement is that it teaches and motivates specific behaviors by using items or activities that appeal to your teenager, states Shannon Baranski, psychology professor with the Houston Community College. Instead of punishing your adolescent by taking away an item or a privilege, you harness the psychological power of a powerful incentive to encourage him to cooperate or perform.

Reinforcement vs. Punishment: Changing Behavior Being a parent has been known as the best thing ever BUT also the most challenging endeavor you will encounter in your lifetime. Parents strive to raise a healthy and happy child that will one day grow up as a full-fledged mature and independent adult. But to successfully accomplish this goal, a parent must set forth structure or rules throughout their childhood to help them understand and be realigned when their behavior needs to be modified. When a parent recognizes the need to change a behavior, they will likely end up using either reinforcement, punishment, or a mixture of both. When we’re helping to decrease the frequency of a child’s negative behavior, having the reinforcement or punishment methods in our toolkit can help you modify and implement the desired behavior.

This video gives a visual representation of how positive reinforcement can be used in a variety of situations, on both teens and oneself, in order to achieve desirable behaviours. by callistael Mar 28

Related:  Reinforcement and Punishment: Useful insights for parenting teenage children