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Popcorn Time was one of the most-discussed topics last month with contributors happy to chat and bathe in the publicity. Recently though, something has changed. Previously talkative developers have deleted their work, gone silent, disappeared, or all of the above. It's hard not to draw the obvious conclusion. Millions of BitTorrent downloaders use proxies or VPN services to protect their privacy. These tools offer anonymity by replacing one's residential IP-address with that of the privacy service.

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Green Is The New Red — Activism Is Not Terrorism When I received this collection of comics, I had to drop everything and read all of them. Liberator is a series about young vigilantes who go above the law (and go underground) to rescue animals from vivisection labs, dogfighting rings, and anywhere else they are abused. What I love about the series is that it presents a counter-narrative to the political reality of “eco-terrorism.” The comics are of course fictitious. Levoltz - The Social Media Guide LeVoltz.com may be available for purchase. Inquire today! Inquiry Form

Looking For A uTorrent Alternative? Try qBittorrent A lot of users rely on the popular uTorrent Bittorrent client when it comes to downloading files with the help of torrents from the Internet. In past years, things have changed when it comes to that client. It first was purchased by Bittorrent, and then started to integrate features into the client that were not loved by all of the program's user base. A uTorrent Plus version was released recently for instance, that is offering additional capabilities for a price, and while those features are not necessary for the program's core functionality, it is something that many users do not like. In addition to that, advertisement is now shown in the client. It can be disabled for now though, but many users probably do not know how to do so.

Your Neighborhood NSA by The Center for Investigative Reporting — Beacon You’re being watched. With funding from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and local taxpayers, police departments across the country are collecting unprecedented amounts of information about Americans. They’re using images from bridge crossings, GPS data, facial recognition, smart video motion recognition, license-plate readers, camera networks and other technology to create or expand surveillance hubs on a citywide or regional level. The Center for Investigative Reporting is deeply interested in the emerging technologies that could revolutionize policing – and how the public is monitored by the government. Our team of reporters and producers – Andrew Becker, Matt Drange, Amanda Pike, G.W.

Pseudonymity Pseudonymity, a word derived from pseudonym, meaning 'false name', is a state of disguised identity. The pseudonym identifies a holder, that is, one or more human beings who possess but do not disclose their true names (that is, legal identities).[1] Most pseudonym holders use pseudonyms because they wish to remain anonymous, but anonymity is difficult to achieve, and is often fraught with legal issues.[2] True anonymity requires unlinkability, such that an attacker's examination of the pseudonym holder's message provides no new information about the holder's true name.[3] Examples[edit]

ALEC Exposed Progressive Policies Win at the Ballot Box Ballot measures across the country passed on November 8th highlighting the fact that progressive values still resonate with the U.S. electorate. Gains were made even in the face of industry deception and big dollar ad campaigns. In a victory for climate activists and solar energy, Floridians voted down Amendment 1, a constitutional amendment which would have made it hard for people with solar panels to sell energy back to the grid. Read the rest of this item here. Kochs Battle Dark Money Disclosure in South Dakota

Home CBS asks for more money from a declining Time-Warner Cable, while customers can get it nearly free online or via an antenna. Before Google Glass' latest patch, a picture could have been worth a thousand hacks. It might be the technology of the future — but not of the present, judging by the simplistic and surprisingly expensive items offered so far. Anonymizer An anonymizer or an anonymous proxy is a tool that attempts to make activity on the Internet untraceable. It is a proxy server computer that acts as an intermediary and privacy shield between a client computer and the rest of the Internet. It accesses the Internet on the user's behalf, protecting personal information by hiding the client computer's identifying information.[1][2] Purposes[edit] There are many reasons for using anonymizers. Anonymizers help minimize risk.

OpenCryptoChip – Open Crypto Project The Layer Cake Architecture Picture ¶ Use Cases ¶ RPKI/DNSSEC Signing Transport VPNs Routers and TCP/AO Email Federations, Identity Systems, SSO etc Password Stretching & HMAC:ing PGP and SSH Keys on a Stick High Quality Entropy Randomness A Communications Terminal Doing One Thing Well, Like Jabber w/o X11 HSM for Pond, OTR identity keys, ssh private keys, etc. Nerd, Dork, Geek, Dweeb: What’s the Difference? Great White Snark provides a totally necessary and welcome diagram (h/t Rebecca Hersh). Since I prefer intelligence overall, think obsession has good, secondary value and find little to be recommended in social ineptitude but will accept it if required to support the first two, here’s the preference hierarchy, as I see it: Geek,Nerd,Dweeb,Dork.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Anand Gopal, No Good Men Among the Living: America, the Taliban, and the War through Afghan Eyes Welcome Anand Gopal (AnandGopal.com) (Twitter) and Host Juan Cole (Informed Comment blog - JuanCole.com) (Twitter) No Good Men Among the Living: America, the Taliban, and the War through Afghan Eyes Anand Gopal’s No Good Men Among the Living is a deconstruction of the American “War on Terror” as it pertained to Afghanistan. It is an argument that the US military allowed itself to fall into chasing phantoms, put up to search and destroy missions by tribal allies mainly interested in using the Americans to settle feuds and deflect rivals. They got drawn into what anthropologists call the segmentary lineage political system of rural Afghanistan. In short, as Gopal tells the story, there was no Taliban activity in Afghanistan to speak of by 2002, but the US military machine required an enemy, and its clients among the men on the make in Karzai’s Afghanistan were glad to supply alleged Taliban (sometimes even tagging as such men who had spent a decade fighting the puritanical seminarians).

Afghanistan and the Artificial US War on Terror (Gopal Anand's New Book) By Juan Cole I guest-hosted a book salon over at Firedoglake on Sunday concentrating on Anand Gopal’s expose of the so-called ‘war on terror’ in Afghanistan. Below is my review of the book. Do go to FDL to read the whole salon, where Mr. Google: "Goggles Does NOT Do Face Recognition" The big news out of Hot Chips on Monday was Google's promise to have its Goggles visual search app ready for the iPhoneby the end of 2010. Google Goggles project lead David Petrous also provided the inside scoop into how Goggles deciphers your images in the cloud. But the most interesting takeaway from Petrous' talk was his repeated insistence that Google Goggles does not do facial recognition—interspersed by a long tutorial on how well it would work if it did.

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