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Modal Verbs

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Modal Auxiliary Verbs. Page 1 of 2 Not long ago, a listener who likes my iOS game Grammar Pop asked us to record a podcast on modal auxiliary verbs, so here it is!

Modal Auxiliary Verbs

We’ll start with the basics of modals, and then talk about one way of using modals that’s associated with Southern American English. What Are the Auxiliary Verbs? If you’ve listened to this podcast for a while, you’ve probably heard me talk about auxiliary verbs, which also go by the less-fancy name of helping verbs.

May vs. Might

Modals. Grammar-Quizzes › Verb Phrases › Verb Groups › Modals Summary of Practices Modal Diagnostic: identify specific points that need review Quiz 1: beginning – intermediate.

Modals

Will vs. would. Could (Modal Verb) Semi-Modal Auxiliary Verbs. What are semi-modal auxiliary verbs?

Semi-Modal Auxiliary Verbs

Semi-modal auxiliary verbs, often simply called semi-modal verbs, are verbs that sometimes behave like modal auxiliary verbs. (They are also sometimes known as marginal modal verbs.) Modal verbs - synonyms and related words. Can modal verb to have the necessary ability, knowledge, money, or equipment to do something.

modal verbs - synonyms and related words

Modal Auxiliary Verbs. What is a modal auxiliary verb?

Modal Auxiliary Verbs

A modal auxiliary verb, often simply called a modal verb or even just a modal, is used to change the meaning of other verbs (commonly known as main verbs) by expressing modality—that is, asserting (or denying) possibility, likelihood, ability, permission, obligation, or future intention. Modal verbs are defined by their inability to conjugate for tense and the third person singular (i.e., they do not take an “-s” at the end when he, she, or it is the subject), and they cannot form infinitives, past participles, or present participles. All modal auxiliary verbs are followed by a main verb in its base form (the infinitive without to); they can never be followed by other modal verbs, lone auxiliary verbs, or nouns.

British Council. Modals – deduction (present) Modals – deduction (present) Modals – deduction past. British Council. Modals (1) Permission, Prohibition, Obligation, No obligation To express permission, prohibition, obligation and no obligation we usually use modal verbs.

British Council

Have to, must and should for obligation and advice. We use have to / must / should + infinitive to talk about obligation, things that are necessary to do, or to give advice about things that are a good idea to do.

Have to, must and should for obligation and advice

Must and have to are both used for obligation and are often quite similar. They are both followed by the infinitive. I must go now. / I have to go now. Are these exactly the same? Appendix:English modal verbs. Appendix:English modal verbs Introduction[edit] This is a brief overview of modal auxiliary verbs in common usage in English.

Appendix:English modal verbs

Modality: forms - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Dare, need, ought to and used to are often called semi-modal because in some ways they are formed like modal verbs and in some ways they are like other main verbs.

Modality: forms - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary

Like modal verbs, ought to and used to do not change form for person. Needn’t and daren’t do not have a third person -s in the present: English modal verbs. The modal verbs of English are a small class of auxiliary verbs used mostly to express modality (properties such as possibility, obligation, etc.).

English modal verbs

They can be distinguished from other verbs by their defectiveness (they do not have participle or infinitive forms) and by the fact that they do not take the ending -(e)s in the third-person singular. The principal English modal verbs are can, could, may, might, must, shall, should, will and would. Certain other verbs are sometimes, but not always, classed as modals; these include ought, had better, and (in certain uses) dare and need. Verbs which share some but not all of the characteristics of the principal modals are sometimes called "semimodals". Modal verbs and their features[edit]

Semi-Modal & quasi-modal Verbs

Will definition and meaning. Noun the power of making a reasoned choice or decision or of controlling one's own actions a. strong and fixed purpose; determination. Should definition and meaning. Should - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Should comes first in the verb phrase (after the subject and before another verb): I should go home now. Should cannot be used with another modal verb: It should probably be sunny at that time of year. Not: It should may be sunny … or It may should be sunny … Shall definition and meaning. Ought definition and meaning. Ought to - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Ought to is a semi-modal verb because it is in some ways like a modal verb and in some ways like a main verb.

For example, unlike modal verbs, it is followed by to, but like modal verbs, it does not change form for person: I ought to phone my parents. It ought to be easy now. Ought to comes first in the verb phrase (after the subject and before another verb): We ought to do more exercise. Ought to - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary.

Need definition and meaning. Noun necessity or obligation created by some situation a lack of something useful, required, or desired something useful, required, or desired that is lacking; want; requirement b. Need - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Need is a semi-modal verb because in some ways it is like a modal verb and in other ways like a main verb. We use need mostly in the negative form to indicate that there is no obligation or necessity to do something: You needn’t take off your shoes. Affirmatives with the semi-modal need are not common and they are used in formal contexts. Must definition and meaning. Must - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary.

Might definition and meaning. Might - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Collins English Dictionary. May - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Have got to do sth definition and meaning. Have to do definition and meaning. Have got to and have to - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Collins English Dictionary. Can - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Be expressions ( be able to, be due to ) - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Could - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Modality: meanings and uses - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary.

Modality: introduction - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Requests - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Can, could or may ? - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Could definition and meaning. Video Lesson - Modal Verbs To Express Possibility. Video Lesson - Modal Verbs - Certainty and Probability. Modal verbs - synonyms and related words. Ought To. Modals of Probability. May and Might. Have To. Have (Possession) How to Use the Word Ought. How To Use "Do" with Modal Verbs. Shades of Modality. Would Have or Would of? Modal Verbs-Definition and Usage. English Modal Verbs. Video Lesson - Using Should. Video Lesson - Introduction To Modal Verbs. How to Use 'Must' - Modal Verbs Video Lesson. Video Lesson - Modal Verbs To Express Ability (Can, Could, Be Able To)

How to Use 'Should', 'Ought to', 'Supposed to' and 'Had Better' May or might? Can or could? Must, should, or ought? What’s the difference between ‘will’ and ‘shall’? May Versus Might. Modal Auxiliary Verbs. Can Versus May. Is "Have Got" Acceptable English? BBC Learning English - Course: Upper-intermediate / Unit 25 / Session 1 / Activity 1. BBC Learning English - Course: lower intermediate / Unit 30 / Session 2 / Activity 1. BBC Learning English - Course: intermediate / Unit 6 / Session 2 / Activity 1. BBC Learning English - Course: Towards Advanced / Unit 11 / Session 5 / Activity 1. Modal verbs. Have got. Have to, must and should for obligation and advice. Can, could and would for invitations, offers, requests and permission. LearnEnglish Teens - British Council. Site:britishcouncil.org "modal verb" at DuckDuckGo.

Site:cambridge.org modal verb inurl:grammar - -Google. Modality: tense - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Modal Verbs. Can and Could. Could You...? Requests. Modal Verbs.