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Fluent LandKey Words for Writing. Fluent Land75 Important Prepositions. Irregular Verbs? Yes,Please! My son Lucas was complaining he was going to have a permanent crick in his neck from spending hourrrrrs (or words to that effect) trying to learn irregular verbs in English when it occurred to me there might be plenty of sites on the Internet to help students, and my own son in this case, with this seemingly daunting task.

Irregular Verbs? Yes,Please!

And just as I predicted there are some cool sites that offer a nice alternative to the traditional pen-and-paper method of learning irregular verbs. Hard to believe me? Then, try these games and I bet you’ll be delighted next time you are asked to study them. Dear Lucas, this post is for you!!! Jeopardy Quiz Game Fun activity to teach action verbs in the irregular past simple tense. Irregular Verb Wheel Game An enjoyable game where irregular verbs are chosen at random from a spinning wheel. Hangman Game From eslgamesplus.com, the always entertaining hangman game; in this case, with irregular verbs.

Irregular Verbs Walk the Plank. Can You Catch These Native Speaker Mistakes? From VOA Learning English, this is Everyday Grammar.

Can You Catch These Native Speaker Mistakes?

This week, we will learn a few English words and phrases that are commonly misused in English. Even well-educated native English speakers make the mistakes you will read and hear about today, including reporters and English teachers! After today’s program, you can have fun finding these mistakes when other people use them. Let’s start with a very common written mistake that native English speakers make. "could of" or could’ve If you spend time on social media, such as Facebook, you may see that native English speakers often use the word of after the words could, would or should.

I could of gone to New York last weekend. However, the word of is a preposition. The preposition of sounds just like the shortened version of the verb have, which is pronounced ’ve. In speaking, this is not a problem, since both phrases sound the same. In writing, an easy way to remember the correct form is that could, would and should are helping verbs. Learn English with us. English Grammar Mistake: Common Grammatical Mistakes And How To Avoid Them - Fluent LandFluent Land. The English Language is a difficult beast to tie down.

English Grammar Mistake: Common Grammatical Mistakes And How To Avoid Them - Fluent LandFluent Land

Even those rules which we consider mandatory may actually change very quickly, especially with words moving into ever more fleeting media. However, there are a few mistakes which – for now at least – can make you look very silly… Most Common English Grammar Mistake And How To Avoid Them English Grammar Mistake 1. Its/it’s Apostrophes should be used to indicate possession, but there is one exception to this rule, and that is the word “it”.

The rules: “It’s” is only ever used when short for “it is”. How not to do it: Its snowing outsideThe sofa looks great with it’s new cover How to do it properly: It’s snowing outsideThe sofa looks great with its new cover English Grammar Mistake 2. This common mistake arises because the contracted form of “could have” – “could’ve” – sounds a bit like “could of” when you say it out loud. Phrasal verb videos. "Weird Al" Yankovic - Word Crimes. Singular "they" - definition and examples in English grammar. By Richard Nordquist Updated February 20, 2016.

singular "they" - definition and examples in English grammar

Definition In English grammar, singular "they" is the use of the pronoun they, them, or their to refer to a singular noun or to certain indefinite pronouns (such as anybody or everyone). Also called epicene "they" and unisex "they. " Though strict prescriptive grammarians regard the singular they as a grammatical error, it has been in widespread use for several centuries. In January 2016, the American Dialect Society chose the gender-neutral singular they as its Word of the Year: "They was recognized by the society for its emerging use as a pronoun to refer to a known person, often as a conscious choice by a person rejecting the traditional gender binary of he and she" (American Dialect Society press release, January 8, 2016).

See Examples and Observations below. Third-Person Pronouns Examples and Observations "When a person talks too much, they learn little. "