Public art

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Whodunit with the paperknife in the library? - News. IT IS the mysterious case of the paper sculptures that would have even veteran detective John Rebus struggling for answers.

Whodunit with the paperknife in the library? - News

But after extensive investigation, a shortlist of suspects believed to be responsible for leaving three anonymous works of art linked to the writings of Ian Rankin at public institutions in Edinburgh has emerged. Those fingered as possible culprits include a Danish paper artist, an Edinburgh College of Art (ECA) lecturer and an illustrator from the city. Outsiders are a Banksy-style French street artist and a London-based miniaturist. The tiny works of art have caused a sensation in the city since the first one appeared at the Scottish Poetry Library in March.

Two weeks ago a sculpture was left in the National Library of Scotland depicting a coffin and a gramophone constructed out of pages of crimewriter Rankin's final Rebus novel Exit Music. Demarco was enchanted by the sculptures. Anne Bevan, sculpture lecturer at ECA, had a few theories of her own. Who Left A Tree, Then A Coffin In The Library? : Krulwich Wonders... Update: The Library Phantom Returns!

Who Left A Tree, Then A Coffin In The Library? : Krulwich Wonders...

See Part 2 of the mystery. It started suddenly. Without warning. Last spring, Julie Johnstone, a librarian at the Scottish Poetry Library in Edinburgh, was wandering through a reading room when she saw, sitting alone on a random table, a little tree. It was made of twisted paper and was mounted on a book. Gorgeously crafted, it came with a gold-leafed eggshell broken in two, each half filled with little strips of paper with phrases on them. What was this? "This is for you in support of libraries, books, words, ideas... " said a note, addressed to the Library by its twitter name "@ByLeavesWeLive". Then, it happened again This time, a coffin, topped by a large gramophone showed up suddenly at The National Library of Scotland.

Once again, a note said, "A gift in support of libraries, books, words, ideas... (& against their exit). " Next came a movie theater, one of Edinburgh's local art film houses. Was this Rankin's doing? Then, the pace quickened. Mysterious paper sculptures - Central Station Blog post. Those of you who don’t keep up with Edinburgh’s literary world through Twitter may have missed the recent spate of mysterious paper sculptures appearing around the city.

Mysterious paper sculptures - Central Station Blog post

Guardian article, 3rd March 2011. One day in March, staff at the Scottish Poetry Library came across a wonderful creation, left anonymously on a table in the library. Carved from paper, mounted on a book and with a tag addressed to @byleaveswelive – the library’s Twitter account – reading: It started with your name @byleaveswelive and became a tree.… … We know that a library is so much more than a building full of books… a book is so much more than pages full of words.… This is for you in support of libraries, books, words, ideas….. a gesture (poetic maybe?)

Next to the ‘poetree’ sat a paper egg lined with gold and a scatter of words which, when put together, make “A Trace of Wings” by Edwin Morgan. It looked like this was a one-off, a beautiful and delicate piece of art created by a fan of the Poetry Library. The tag? Bunny Project Kalmar. Performance commissioned by Kalmar Museum of Art, Sweden.

Bunny Project Kalmar

During the inauguration of the new art museum in Kalmar a suspicious individual sneaked around the premises mounting sculptures made of carrots, alarm clocks, red and blue cables, metal wire and tape. On direct orders from the Swedish secret police the performance was stopped since the Culture Minister refused to give her inaugural speech if it were to continue. The speech , as it later turned out, was about how art must be allowed to be free and provocative.

Non-traditional spaces

Mark Jenkins // Street Installations. The Garden of Cosmic Speculation. Public Art Concepts - Dan Sternof Beyer 2011. Non-traditional spaces. Street Art.