Learning & Intelligence

Facebook Twitter

5 Freewriting Secrets for Being a "Genius". You've heard of freewriting, certainly.

5 Freewriting Secrets for Being a "Genius"

At its most basic, it's about forcing your internal editor to stay away while you splash your most raw and unusual thoughts onto the page. In Accidental Genius: Using Writing to Generate Your Best Ideas, Insights, and Content (2nd edition, revised & updated), Mark Levy tells how he uses freewriting, not only to loosen up his writing muscles, but to solve business problems of all kinds. Backmasking & Reverse Speech. What is Reverse Speech?

Backmasking & Reverse Speech

It has been called the discovery of the 7th sense. The research into this phenomenon has been described as being of "Nobel calibre". It has been featured in numerous publications around the world, and in the United States it became a household name in the late 90s. It is called Reverse Speech, the phenomenon of hidden backward messages in speech. How to Re-program Your Memory to Become More Self-Reliant. Highly Trusting People Better Lie Detectors. Contrary to our intuition, research suggests that more trusting people are better than cynics at detecting when others are lying.

Highly Trusting People Better Lie Detectors

Humans can be an untrusting race. People are often very cynical about human nature, tending to think that strangers will happily lie to us if there is something in it for them. We intuitive believe that being cynical is an advantage in detecting lies. Or so Nancy Carter and J. Mark Weber found when they asked a group of MBA students whether people high or low in trust would be better at detecting lies in others (Carter & Weber, 2010). How to Promote Visionary Thinking. Why we are more creative when mind and body are out of step.

How to Promote Visionary Thinking

Usually we perform best with mind and body in sync. With our thoughts tied to our actions decisions are made faster, we are more engaged and we feel at one with ourselves. If you want to be creative, though, sometimes it pays to be out of sync according to a recent study by Huang and Galinsky (2011). They had some people recalling a happy time in their life while at the same time frowning. The All-Time Top Six Psychological Reasons We Love Music. What psychological roles does music play in our lives?

The All-Time Top Six Psychological Reasons We Love Music

Modern technology means it’s never been easier to hear exactly the music we want, whenever we want it. But whatever technology we use, the reasons we listen to music are universal. THE REVOLUTIONARY PLEASURE OF THINKING FOR YOURSELF. How to Hack Your Brain. Manipulation News, Videos, Reviews and Gossip - Lifehacker. "Mind-Mapping": How We Manipulate the People We Love. December 7, 2011 | Like this article?

"Mind-Mapping": How We Manipulate the People We Love

Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. Conventional therapeutic wisdom aside, people typically don’t hurt each other because they’re out of touch, unable to communicate, or can’t help themselves. All too frequently, they do hurtful things with impunity and entitlement simply to gratify their own needs. Home Page. This wiki is a collaborative environment for exploring ways to become a better thinker.

Home Page

Topics that can be explored here include MemoryTechniques, MentalMath, CriticalThinking, BrainStorming, ShorthandSystems, NotebookSystems, and SmartDrugs. Other relevant topics are also welcome. SiteNews Wiki Topics Mindhacker: The support page for the 2011 book by RonHaleEvans and MartyHaleEvans. Why Do Some People Learn Faster?

The physicist Niels Bohr once defined an expert as “a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field.”

Why Do Some People Learn Faster?

Bohr’s quip summarizes one of the essential lessons of learning, which is that people learn how to get it right by getting it wrong again and again. Education isn’t magic. Education is the wisdom wrung from failure. A new study, forthcoming in Psychological Science, and led by Jason Moser at Michigan State University, expands on this important concept. The question at the heart of the paper is simple: Why are some people so much more effective at learning from their mistakes?