Humantrafficking

Facebook Twitter
Nicholas D. Kristof Meena Khatum, right, had to fight against brothel owners to be reunited with her son, Vivek. Anyone who thinks that the word “slavery” is hyperbole when used to describe human trafficking today should meet Meena Khatun. She not only endured the unbearable, but has also shown that a slave trader’s greed sometimes is no match for a mother’s love. The 21st-Century Slave Trade The 21st-Century Slave Trade
Trafficking involves transporting people away from the communities in which they live and forcing them to work against their will using violence, deception or coercion. When children are trafficked, no violence, deception or coercion needs to be involved: simply transporting them into exploitative conditions constitutes trafficking. People are trafficked both between countries and within the borders of a state. Anti-Slavery - Trafficking Anti-Slavery - Trafficking
The BetterWorld Project
Trade Justice Movement
Olaudah Equiano (c. 1745 – 31 March 1797)[1] also known as Gustavus Vassa, was a prominent African involved in the British movement for the abolition of the slave trade. He was enslaved as a child in his home town of Essaka in what is now south Nigeria, shipped to the West Indies, moved to England, and successfully purchased his freedom. Throughout his life Equiano worked as an author, a seafarer, merchant, hairdresser, and explorer in South and Central America, the Caribbean, and the Arctic, the American colonies, and the United Kingdom, where he settled by 1792. His autobiography, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, depicts the horrors of slavery and influenced the enactment of the Slave Trade Act of 1807.[2] Early life and enslavement[edit] Olaudah Equiano Olaudah Equiano
Anti slavery Anti slavery Abolitionism is a movement to end slavery, whether formal or informal. In Western Europe and the Americas, abolitionism was a historical movement to end the African slave trade and set slaves free. The Spanish government enacted the first European law abolishing colonial slavery in 1542, although this law was not widely enforced. Later, in the 17th century, English Quakers and evangelical religious groups condemned slavery (by then applied mostly to Africans) as un-Christian; in the 18th century, abolition was part of the message of the First Great Awakening in the Thirteen Colonies; and in the same period, rationalist thinkers of the Enlightenment criticized it for violating the rights of man. James Edward Oglethorpe was among the first to articulate the Enlightenment case against slavery, banning it in the Province of Georgia on humanistic grounds, arguing against it in Parliament, and eventually encouraging his friends Granville Sharp and Hannah More to vigorously pursue the cause.
Welcome to the A21 Campaign
Salon.com Up close at the Egyptian revolution Jehane Noujaim's thrilling Oscar nominee "The Square" stays on the Cairo streets through two revolutions Andrew O'Hehir Friday, Jan 17, 2014 12:00 AM UTC Entertainment Movies, Documentaries, Our Picks “SNL” finalist on audition: “It was such a historic moment” Simone Shepherd tells Salon about her experience auditioning for Lorne Michaels

Salon.com

Hope for Justice : Hope for Justice
Christian Action Christian Action "For unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given; and the Government shall be upon His shoulder. And His Name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of His Government and peace, there shall be no end…" Isaiah 9:6-7 A Miraculous BookThe Bible is a supernatural Book.
Tearfund
The UN Refugee Agency
STOP THE TRAFFIK blog spot Are You a #FashionVictim? If you were pressed, would you admit to being a fashion victim? Have a think: how many clothes have you bought in the past week, month or year? You might secretly admit to being a fashion victim because you buy clothes you don’t necessarily need but you just can’t live without… But do you know … Read more Running up that hill STOP THE TRAFFIK blog spot