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Prof. Sugata Mitra

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Given Internet access, can kids really learn anything by themselves? GWEN IFILL: But, first, how a simple experiment in India has turned into a radical idea, whether students should teach themselves by giving them a computer and stepping back.

Given Internet access, can kids really learn anything by themselves?

Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports, part of our Making Sense series, which airs every Thursday on the NewsHour. STUDENT: Why do dogs chase cats? PAUL SOLMAN: I have absolutely no idea. A public elementary school in Harlem, New York, is adopting a radical idea that threatens the education industry as we know it, SOLEs, Self-Organized Learning Environments. STUDENT: How do you make a computer? STUDENT: How come father seahorses have babies, but the females don’t? PAUL SOLMAN: The students come up with the questions, and then choose one to answer.

SUGATA MITRA, Newcastle University: OK, so now here’s what’s going to happen. Sugata Mitra – the professor with his head in the cloud. The story of how Sugata Mitra put a computer in a hole in a Delhi wall at the end of the last century and how uneducated children used it to teach themselves all manner of things is now well known.

Sugata Mitra – the professor with his head in the cloud

So is the story of how Mitra’s work inspired the novel, Q&A, that became the film Slumdog Millionaire. But no government has taken more than a passing interest in his vision. Nor, although teachers have often tried his methods and reported miraculous results, have professional associations and university education departments responded with much enthusiasm. Seventeen years after Mitra conceived the idea that a computer could act as a kind of village well from which children could freely draw knowledge, the educational world treats him with deep scepticism. But Mitra launches into a speech about “what is happening to the world”. “In India, I found two illiterate people texting each other. And what entertainment! Your brain does not process information and it is not a computer. No matter how hard they try, brain scientists and cognitive psychologists will never find a copy of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony in the brain – or copies of words, pictures, grammatical rules or any other kinds of environmental stimuli.

Your brain does not process information and it is not a computer

The human brain isn’t really empty, of course. But it does not contain most of the things people think it does – not even simple things such as ‘memories’. Should students be allowed to use the internet in exams? At a recent British Council debate, Is teaching obsolete?

Should students be allowed to use the internet in exams?

, Professor Sugata Mitra called for internet-connected devices to be taken into the exam hall. Here is a transcript of his argument. I don't think we have to look at whether teaching has become obsolete, we need to look at the examination system. Teachers are the way they are because of the examination system in schools. They don't have a choice. Let's look at examinations. There was a great jump after about a thousand years. Allow a tablet connected to the internet to be brought in to the examination hall. If you do that the entire system will change. What it does not do, is it does not tell you how to discriminate. Put a tablet into an examination hall. Keynote speech by Professor Sugata Mitra, at the 'Is teaching obsolete?

' Sugata Mitra is professor of educational technology at the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences at Newcastle University. My Journey with Kalkaji SinC Continues by Rekha Sharma – School in the Cloud. Hello all of you.

My Journey with Kalkaji SinC Continues by Rekha Sharma – School in the Cloud

I have brought some new and fresh experiences hearing of which will give you goosebumps. When I see and hear my students I feel so glad for which I have no words as no one can express such things in words. When I joined this school, the children were not so well mannered and patient. What can the Western education system learn from the developing world? Students in Karakati, India, research the answer to a big question at a location of Sugata Mitra’s School in the Cloud.

What can the Western education system learn from the developing world?

According to Mitra and his Microsoft Work Wonders Project partner, Adam Braun, there’s quite a bit that Western schools can learn from classrooms in the developing world. Adam Braun went to school in the US and now runs a nonprofit that builds schools in Ghana, Laos, Nicaragua and Guatemala. In contrast, Sugata Mitra—the winner of the 2013 TED Prize—went to school in India and now is a professor in the UK, where his research on self-directed learning routinely brings him into elementary schools. Both of these education activists have seen how typical classrooms function in the Western world, and both have seen how typical classrooms function in the developing world. And both say, the West isn’t always better. To start us off, can each of you share three lessons that the developing world can teach the developed world when it comes to education? Lessons in spelling 'have no place in 21st century schools'

Professor Sugata Mitra On Teaching Spelling And Grammar: Phones Have Made It Unnecessary. Well, this is an opinion you don’t often hear in the education world.

Professor Sugata Mitra On Teaching Spelling And Grammar: Phones Have Made It Unnecessary

Acclaimed professor and educational researcher Sugata Mitra suggested in an interview with British education magazine TES that he no longer thinks it's entirely necessary for kids to learn spelling and grammar. He credits the proliferation of new technologies, such as the "autocorrect" feature on mobile phones, for phasing out such curricula. “Firstly, my phone corrects my spelling so I don’t really need to think about it and, secondly, because I often skip grammar and write in a cryptic way,” Mitra told the magazine last week. Spelling? My phone takes care of that - news. Literacy Comment:Last Updated:13 August, 2013Section:news Education guru Sugata Mitra challenges the ‘right’ way to write Learning how to spell and construct grammatical sentences has long been considered a basic pillar of good schooling.

Spelling? My phone takes care of that - news

But now one of education’s most radical and influential thinkers has claimed that the growth of technology makes spelling and grammar a “bit unnecessary”, at least in their conventional form. Sugatam - home. Conversation with Prof. Sugata Mitra: The Hole-in-the-wall experiments Online Class by Dr. Nellie Deutsch.