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20 Vintage Photos of Prohibition in Boston. Prohibition in the United States was a national ban on the sale, manufacture, and transportation of alcohol, in place from 1920 to 1933.

20 Vintage Photos of Prohibition in Boston

The ban was mandated by the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution, and the Volstead Act set down the rules for enforcing the ban and defined the types of alcoholic beverages that were prohibited. Prohibition ended with the ratification of the Twenty-first Amendment, which repealed the Eighteenth Amendment, on December 5, 1933. The introduction of alcohol prohibition and its subsequent enforcement in law was a hotly debated issue. The contemporary prohibitionists (“dries”) labeled this as the “Noble Experiment” and presented it as a victory for public morals and health. The consumption of alcohol overall went down by half in the 1920s; and it remained below pre-Prohibition levels until the 1940s. 1. 2. $175,000 in Liquor Seized by Coast Guard – Jan. 18, 1932 $175,000 in liquor seized in Dorchester Bay by Coast Guard men from Base 5. Captured: Great Depression Photos: America in Color 1939-1943. Posted Jul 26, 2010 Share This Gallery inShare324 These images, by photographers of the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information, are some of the only color photographs taken of the effects of the Depression on America’s rural and small town populations.

Captured: Great Depression Photos: America in Color 1939-1943

The photographs and captions are the property of the Library of Congress and were included in a 2006 exhibit Bound for Glory: America in Color. Faro and Doris Caudill, homesteaders. Pie Town, New Mexico, October 1940. Connecticut town on the sea. Farm auction. Children gathering potatoes on a large farm. Trucks outside of a starch factory. Headlines posted in street-corner window of newspaper office (Brockton Enterprise). Children in the tenement district. Going to town on Saturday afternoon. Chopping cotton on rented land near White Plains. Historical Photography. Early 1900s in Colour. All around the world - Franny Wentzel - Thursday, May 6th, 2010 : goo [previous] :: [next] In the early part of the 20th century French-Jewish capitalist Albert Kahn set about to collect a photographic record of the world, the images were held in an 'Archive of the Planet'.

Early 1900s in Colour

Before the 1929 stock market crash he was able to amass a collection of 180,000 metres of b/w film and more than 72,000 autochrome plates, the first industrial process for true colour photography Autochrome was the first industrial process for true colour photography. 40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken. A moving collection of iconic photographs from the last 100 years that demonstrate the heartbreak of loss, the tremendous power of loyalty, and the triumph of the human spirit.

Warning: Some of these will make you weep. Earthrise: A photo taken by astronaut William Anders during the Apollo 8 mission in 1968. Phyllis Siegel, 76, left, and Connie Kopelov, 84, both of New York, embrace after becoming the first same-sex couple to get married at the Manhattan City Clerk’s office in 2011. John F. 42 Unseen Photos Of Child Labour in U.S History. Top 10 Pictures That Shocked The World. It has often been said throughout time that a picture is worth a thousand words.

Top 10 Pictures That Shocked The World

Any picture may be worth a thousand words, but only a few rare photos tell more than a thousand words. They tell a powerful story, a story poignant enough to change the world and galvanize each of us. War Collections. Robert Kennedy's Assassination: Photos From Before and After June 5, 1968. How many times must we live through these throat-paralyzing sequences of days of gun play, grief and muffled drums?

Robert Kennedy's Assassination: Photos From Before and After June 5, 1968

That question, posed by LIFE magazine in its June 14, 1968, issue, is freighted with all of the emotions — sorrow, frustration, a kind of bewildered dread — unleashed by the events that unsettled the country in the first half of that schizoid year of 1968. The assassination of Dr. King; the Tet Offensive, the My Lai massacre and the other horrors of the war in Vietnam; and, on June 5, the murder of Robert Kennedy by a Jerusalem-born Palestinian Christian, Sirhan Sirhan, in the kitchen of the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. Here, remembering RFK’s assassination — a murder made, if possible, all the more heinous by the fact that Kennedy was gunned down just as he was finding his true voice as the leader of a vast, disaffected cross-section of the American public — presents a series of photos by the great Bill Eppridge. Robert Kennedy was 42 when he was killed.