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Exhausted new parents lose out on over 650 hours of sleep a year. Research finds sleep deprivation is the most stressful challenge about becoming a parent Research out today by children’s reading charity BookTrust reveals new parents are completely sleep deprived in the child’s first few years, losing out on a whopping 657 hours per year, which equates to almost four weeks of less sleep a year.

Exhausted new parents lose out on over 650 hours of sleep a year

BookTrust, the UK’s largest children’s reading charity also found: Sleep deprivation is the most stressful challenge about becoming a parent, second only to worries about children’s healthA fifth of new parents (21%) have taken a day off work in order to catch up on lost sleep Children not following a Bath, Book, Bed routine are less relaxed at bedtime, get up more often during the night and get fed more frequently The survey polled over 1,000 families on bedtime routines and sleeping habits and revealed that half of parents who don’t follow a Bath, Book, Bed routine would favour a night of uninterrupted sleep over romantic weekends and nights out with friends.

Culford School Library. SLR HowWeStudy V20. Download 464 Free Art Books from The Metropolitan Museum of Art Open Culture. You could pay $118 on Amazon for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s catalog The Art of Illumination: The Limbourg Brothers and the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry.

Download 464 Free Art Books from The Metropolitan Museum of Art Open Culture

Or you could pay $0 to download it at MetPublications, the site offering “five decades of Met Museum publications on art history available to read, download, and/or search for free.” If that strikes you as an obvious choice, prepare to spend some serious time browsing MetPublications’ collection of free art books and catalogs. You may remember that we featured the site a few years ago, back when it offered 397 whole books free for the reading, including American Impressionism and Realism: The Painting of Modern Life, 1885–1915; Leonardo da Vinci: Anatomical Drawings from the Royal Library; and Wisdom Embodied: Chinese Buddhist and Daoist Sculpture in The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Related Content: Download Over 250 Free Art Books From the Getty Museum The Guggenheim Puts 109 Free Modern Art Books Online. Teachers: Is your school library having an impact on teaching and learning? 4 ways school librarians can effect change. Outcomes Framework Toolkit FINAL. Free Resource: Newseum - We Should Be Teaching Infographics. From WhatsApp to Wind in the Willows: the digital v print debate. Sally Perry.

From WhatsApp to Wind in the Willows: the digital v print debate

The Positive and Negative Effects of Video Games - Raise Smart Kid. Is playing video games good or bad for you?

The Positive and Negative Effects of Video Games - Raise Smart Kid

It can be both. Video games are frowned upon by parents as time-wasters, and worse, some education experts think that these games corrupt the brain. Playing violent video games are easily blamed by the media and some experts as the reason why some young people become violent or commit extreme anti-social behavior. But many scientists and psychologists find that video games can actually have many benefits – the main one is making kids smart. Video games may actually teach kids high-level thinking skills that they will need in the future. “Video games change your brain,” according to University of Wisconsin psychologist C. Below are the good and bad effects of video games – their benefits and disadvantages, according to researchers and child experts: Multitasking may harm the social development of tweenage girls, Stanford researchers say. When it comes to media use, the researchers' guidance: All things in moderation.

Multitasking may harm the social development of tweenage girls, Stanford researchers say

(Photo: L.A. Cicero) Stanford Report, January 25, 2012. MM FinalReport 030510. Media multitaskers pay mental price, Stanford study shows. Stanford Report, August 24, 2009 Think you can talk on the phone, send an instant message and read your e-mail all at once?

Media multitaskers pay mental price, Stanford study shows

Stanford researchers say even trying may impair your cognitive control. By Adam Gorlick Attention, multitaskers (if you can pay attention, that is): Your brain may be in trouble. People who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information do not pay attention, control their memory or switch from one job to another as well as those who prefer to complete one task at a time, a group of Stanford researchers has found. High-tech jugglers are everywhere – keeping up several e-mail and instant message conversations at once, text messaging while watching television and jumping from one website to another while plowing through homework assignments. Churchill Archive. The 25 Most Popular Passwords of 2015: We're All Such Idiots. TeenTech. 4 technology trends every librarian needs to know. About these ads Share this:

4 technology trends every librarian needs to know

The internet isn’t making us stupid. It’s making us humble. You are sitting across from a friend who asks if you know the capital of Canada.

The internet isn’t making us stupid. It’s making us humble.

How does your willingness to answer this question change if you have access to the Internet (e.g., via the smartphone in your pocket) or not (e.g., you are hiking in the wilderness with no Internet access)? That's the question psychologists at the University of Toronto and the University of Waterloo pondered in a paper published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition. In a series of experiments, they asked participants trivia questions ranging in difficulty from, "What is the name of a dried grape? " to, "Who was the first ruler of the Holy Roman Empire? " Before participants got the chance to respond, they were asked simply, "Do you know the answer to this question? " Markers of Quality: The Role of Librarians in Everyday Life Information Literacy.

Resources for pupils approaching exams. LIBRESv25i1p16 32.Houston.