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C Semantic Web Activity. The Semantic Web is a web of data.

C Semantic Web Activity

There is lots of data we all use every day, and it is not part of the web. I can see my bank statements on the web, and my photographs, and I can see my appointments in a calendar. But can I see my photos in a calendar to see what I was doing when I took them? Can I see bank statement lines in a calendar? Why not? The Semantic Web is about two things. See also the activity news for an account of recent events, publications, etc. The following groups are part of the Semantic Web Activity. Active Groups Semantic Web Coordination Group The Semantic Web Coordination Group is tasked to provide a forum for managing the interrelationships and interdependencies among groups focusing on standards and technologies that relate to this goals of the Semantic Web Activity.

RDFa Working Group RDF Working Group The mission of the RDF Working Group, is to update the 2004 version of the Resource Description Framework (RDF) Recommendation. Linked Data Platform Working Group. Open Publishing Distribution System. Blog Onyme. Semantic Web Standards. Le Web de données : perspectives pour les métiers de l'information documentation.

Web Ontology Language OWL / W3C Semantic Web Activity. Overview The W3C Web Ontology Language (OWL) is a Semantic Web language designed to represent rich and complex knowledge about things, groups of things, and relations between things.

Web Ontology Language OWL / W3C Semantic Web Activity

OWL is a computational logic-based language such that knowledge expressed in OWL can be exploited by computer programs, e.g., to verify the consistency of that knowledge or to make implicit knowledge explicit. OWL documents, known as ontologies, can be published in the World Wide Web and may refer to or be referred from other OWL ontologies. OWL is part of the W3C’s Semantic Web technology stack, which includes RDF, RDFS, SPARQL, etc.

The current version of OWL, also referred to as “OWL 2”, was developed by the [W3C OWL Working Group] (now closed) and published in 2009, with a Second Edition published in 2012. Recommended Reading These documents are, however, all rather technical and mainly aimed at OWL 2 implementers and tool developers. Last modified and/or added All relevant tools. RDF - Semantic Web Standards. Overview RDF is a standard model for data interchange on the Web.

RDF - Semantic Web Standards

RDF has features that facilitate data merging even if the underlying schemas differ, and it specifically supports the evolution of schemas over time without requiring all the data consumers to be changed. RDF extends the linking structure of the Web to use URIs to name the relationship between things as well as the two ends of the link (this is usually referred to as a “triple”). Using this simple model, it allows structured and semi-structured data to be mixed, exposed, and shared across different applications. This linking structure forms a directed, labeled graph, where the edges represent the named link between two resources, represented by the graph nodes. Recommended Reading The RDF 1.1 specification consists of a suite of W3C Recommendations and Working Group Notes, published in 2014. A number of textbooks have been published on RDF and on Semantic Web in general. Discussions on a possible next version of RDF. Ontology (information science)

In computer science and information science, an ontology formally represents knowledge as a hierarchy of concepts within a domain, using a shared vocabulary to denote the types, properties and interrelationships of those concepts.[1][2] Ontologies are the structural frameworks for organizing information and are used in artificial intelligence, the Semantic Web, systems engineering, software engineering, biomedical informatics, library science, enterprise bookmarking, and information architecture as a form of knowledge representation about the world or some part of it.

The creation of domain ontologies is also fundamental to the definition and use of an enterprise architecture framework. The term ontology has its origin in philosophy and has been applied in many different ways. The word element onto- comes from the Greek ὤν, ὄντος, ("being", "that which is"), present participle of the verb εἰμί ("be").

According to Gruber (1993): Common components of ontologies include: